HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Using UK Gaggia Classic in US (5 msgs / 153 lines)
1) From: Florida Randy
I have a friend coming to vacation in Florida who has an unused Gaggia
Classic to trade for room & board.  Will this appliance work in the US. 
Unsure of the difference in power requirements and plug styles between
the US and UK.  Thanks.

2) From: Brett Mason
Talk to your hardware store about solutions
OR, get an electrician to run a 220 circuit for you.
Then all you need is the adapter for the plug...
Brett
  RWA
On 3/1/07, Florida Randy  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

3) From: Leo Zick
http://electronics.search.ebay.com/transformer_Voltage-Converters_W0QQsacatZ88757

4) From: John Randolph
Below is a website who offers the correct type of converters
(step up converter).  No promises about the best prices but it
will give you the information about what to look for.  You still
will likely need an adapter for the shape and size of prongs on
the plug.  Also if electrically inclined you can rewire with the
correct type of plug but you will still need the voltage
converter.  Be careful to get one that can handle the wattage the
unit will draw.  I have an old Gaggia Moka from Spain and it
draws 800 watts at 220 volts which is a lot of wattage for a 220
volt item. You still may just want to look into having a 220 volt
line run, it may be cheaper if your kitchen is not far from the
breaker box.http://www.dvdoverseas.com/store/index.html?loadfile=catalog6_0.html
You can do like I did, for awhile I put a 30 foot cord on it and
ran it to the garage to plug into an air compressor plug.  The
lengths we go to for our coffee fix, right?

5) From: raymanowen
"...if electrically inclined you can rewire with the correct type of plug
but you will still need the voltage converter.  Be careful to get one that
can handle the wattage the unit will draw.  I have an old Gaggia Moka from
Spain and it draws 800 watts at 220 volts which is a lot of wattage for a
220 volt item."
Hair dryers are commonly rated at 1,200w - 1,875w for a 125v appliance. If
you just splice a Euro conector on the power cord and plug it in, you'll
have a Sylvania Blue Dot flashbulb, no matter what the thing was!
If you are electrically and safety-inclined, you will need no such thing as
a transformer to get "220v." [The step-up transformers for Euro appliances
in the US should have the correct power connector for the appliance. You'll
have to do no wiring.]
Nearly all US residential areas are currently supplied with  240 - 250vac t=
o
run electric ranges and dryers. The standard US 240v will operate the
European 220v appliances just fine.
At "220v," 800 watts of power draws fewer than 4amperes current. You can
safely run 16 AWG wire to handle that current all day long. That's almost
paltry doorbell wire.
The European power system is more economical than our 120v system because
less copper is used in the power wiring, and less power is wasted in the I=
ēR
losses.
Actually, "a lot of wattage for a 220 volt item" is a meaningless statement=
.
My service panel has an unused 50a (12,500w) circuit for a former electric
range, and a spare 30a (7,500w) circuit for the former electric clothes
dryer.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Zap!


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