HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Coffee and Blood Type (a bit long) (4 msgs / 289 lines)
1) From: Jeremy DeFranco
Ken,
     It's great to hear that you made it out alright from the heart attack
and surgery. As a medical student, I'll offer some of my (limited) knowledge
here as well...
I would be wary of "Eat Right for Your Type", to be honest. In short, I
think if you want to use that as an adjunct to medical therapy, that is
perfectly fine, but I would strongly recommend against using the diet as a
substitute to medical therapy.
     The 81 mg of Aspirin is one of the best things you can be doing right
now. BTW, be sure to keep a regular dose aspirin on you at all times... The
best thing to do when you are having a heart attack (AFTER you call 911) is
to chew a regular dose aspirin, and let it dissolve under your tongue into
your sublingual glands or just chew it thoroughly and swallow it. This has
been thoroughly shown to increase one's survival from an MI by greater than
50%.
     The next thing I would recommend is medication to slow the progression
or precipitation of the underlying disorder/disorders that caused the MI in
the first place. For valvular regurgitation, that would mean the use of an
anti-clotting agent (on top of Aspirin) like Clopidogrel (Plavix). For
Atherosclerosis (which almost everyone has to some degree, by-the-way, esp.-
the middle and older adults), that would mean Warfarin (Coumadin). Both of
these agents have been shown to greatly decrease the mortality of these
diseases. For an arrhythmia, you would dramatically reduce your chances of a
bad outcome by taking an anti-arrhythmic.
     On top of this, ACE inhibitors and B-blockers added as adjuncts to your
medical therapy, will reduce your risk of a bad outcome even more so. And,
if your heart is strained, add Spironolactone to the regimen as well (a
K-sparing, mild diuretic).
     I would talk with your Cardiologist about all of these. When prescribed
and monitored properly by a cardiologist, these drugs are safe and can
literally save a person's life. I can honestly say that if it were not for
these agents, it is very likely my grandfather would not still be alive
today. These, and other drugs really have revolutionized medicine, and
really humanity, as well, in that they now allow for much much longer
life-spans of people who might have otherwise died "prematurely." Even
people who have lived their entire lives eating high fat diets can now enjoy
a much lower risk of MI or CVA if they are lucky enough to find a competent
doctor who puts them on these agents before something horrible happens.
     Nothing else, besides a healthy diet (diet alone is still nowhere near
as effective as these agents in reducing bad outcomes, esp. in the
short-run, But, a healthy diet is a great adjunct to the agents listed
above), and EXERCISE! has been shown to be as efficacious as taking these
agents. This is why I would not "roll the dice" by betting on any one study,
or one program, or method, diet etc. Get on the meds first, and then try
these things out.  And, to keep this post somewhat related to coffee,
contrary to old-school medical opinion, unless you have an arrythmia, coffee
is not bad for you. Even if you did have an arrhythmia, and you are being
treated for it, a couple cups of coffee at a time will not be harmful. BTW,
keep eating that fish atleast once a week. Omega-3s have also been shown to
reduce mortality clotting disorders (just be careful to pay attention to
which fish has more mercury than others, etc... and as another side note,
ALWAYS tell your doctor EVERYTHING- cough medicine, herbal, aspirin:
whatever- that you are taking)
----I have spent plenty of time on the internet investigating heart healthy
diets and supplements. BTW I am fully recovered from my heart attack and
open heart surgery in December, and am off all medications except an 81mg
enteric coated aspirin daily. An echocardiogram March 5 showed minimal
damage to the heart.
About two months ago I began a mostly raw fruit and vegetable diet with no
meat except fish. I am also adopting the "Eat Right for Your Type" diet from
Dr. Peter D'Adamo. His book presents the case for choosing which foods to
eat and which to avoid based on the four major blood types, O, A, B, and AB.
My type is A+ and very unfortunately, my favorite foods are on the avoid
list.
There is also a list of beverages. Great news here at least for type A,
including myself, coffee is identified as highly beneficial. The same for
the rare type AB which combines the attributes of types A and B. However for
type B, coffee is neutral, meaning there is no benefit but also no harm. For
type O there is bad news. Coffee, either regular or decaf, increases stomach
acid excessively. Type Os are adapted by their genetic inheritance to meat
eating, and therefore already have plenty of stomach acid for digestion. The
book recommends that type O totally eliminate coffee from their diet.
I make no claims or recommendations. Read the book and choose for yourself.

2) From: Sandra Andina
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On Mar 8, 2007, at 6:32 AM, Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
<Snip>
Jeremy,
	As the wife of a cardiologist, I could not agree more--especially  
your reassurances about coffee's safety (if my husband could mainline  
it through an implanted PIC line he would ). Though my m-i-l is  
dying right now of complications of an ischemic stroke (which without  
TPA would have robbed her of all sentience and movement), she had 95  
good years due to those medications (and to as healthy a diet as her  
vegetarian/fish/lean-poultry-eating husband could get her to stick  
to).  Right now I am toying with giving up the ginkgo since my  
tinnitus is not too bad and going back to the baby aspirin instead (I  
always carry a regular one for emergencies); and trying to get my  
husband to put me on a statin (he says my HDLs at 94 are high enough,  
but you never know; he went to a seminar last night that urged  
statins for anyone over 50 in order to reduce LDLs too).   
Fortunately, my last ultrafast CT scan showed my arteries to be  
fairly healthy for a woman my age (despite my weight), I have no  
arrhythmias nor valvular abnormalities, and I had heart murmurs only  
when pregnant (and the boat has sailed on that one!).  My BP is well- 
controlled with an ARB (ACE inhibitors work better, but as a singer  
the cough they produce is a dealbreaker).
Sandy
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On Mar 8, 2007, at =
6:32 AM, Jeremy DeFranco wrote:
Ken,   =    It's great to hear that you made it out alright from the heart = attack and surgery. As a medical student, I'll offer some of my = (limited) knowledge here as well... I would be wary of "Eat Right for = Your Type", to be honest. In short, I think if you want to use that as = an adjunct to medical therapy, that is perfectly fine, but I would = strongly recommend against using the diet as a substitute to medical = therapy.      The 81 mg of Aspirin is one of the best things = you can be doing right now. BTW, be sure to keep a regular dose aspirin = on you at all times... The best thing to do when you are having a heart = attack (AFTER you call 911) is to chew a regular dose aspirin, and let = it dissolve under your tongue into your sublingual glands or just chew = it thoroughly and swallow it. This has been thoroughly shown to increase = one's survival from an MI by greater than 50%.      The next = thing I would recommend is medication to slow the progression or = precipitation of the underlying disorder/disorders that caused the MI in = the first place. For valvular regurgitation, that would mean the use of = an anti-clotting agent (on top of Aspirin) like Clopidogrel (Plavix). = For Atherosclerosis (which almost everyone has to some degree, = by-the-way, esp.- the middle and older adults), that would mean Warfarin = (Coumadin). Both of these agents have been shown to greatly decrease the = mortality of these diseases. For an arrhythmia, you would dramatically = reduce your chances of a bad outcome by taking an anti-arrhythmic. =      On top of this, ACE inhibitors and B-blockers added as = adjuncts to your medical therapy, will reduce your risk of a bad outcome = even more so. And, if your heart is strained, add Spironolactone to the = regimen as well (a K-sparing, mild diuretic).      I would = talk with your Cardiologist about all of these. When prescribed and = monitored properly by a cardiologist, these drugs are safe and can = literally save a person's life. I can honestly say that if it were not = for these agents, it is very likely my grandfather would not still be = alive today. These, and other drugs really have revolutionized medicine, = and really humanity, as well, in that they now allow for much much = longer life-spans of people who might have otherwise died "prematurely." = Even people who have lived their entire lives eating high fat diets can = now enjoy a much lower risk of MI or CVA if they are lucky enough to = find a competent doctor who puts them on these agents before something = horrible happens. =   Jeremy, As the = wife of a cardiologist, I could not agree more--especially your = reassurances about coffee's safety (if my husband could mainline it = through an implanted PIC line he would <g>). Though my m-i-l is = dying right now of complications of an ischemic stroke (which without = TPA would have robbed her of all sentience and movement), she had 95 = good years due to those medications (and to as healthy a diet as her = vegetarian/fish/lean-poultry-eating husband could get her to stick to). = Right now I am toying with giving up the ginkgo since my tinnitus is = not too bad and going back to the baby aspirin instead (I always carry a = regular one for emergencies); and trying to get my husband to put me on = a statin (he says my HDLs at 94 are high enough, but you never know; he = went to a seminar last night that urged statins for anyone over 50 in = order to reduce LDLs too).  Fortunately, my last ultrafast CT scan = showed my arteries to be fairly healthy for a woman my age (despite my = weight), I have no arrhythmias nor valvular abnormalities, and I had = heart murmurs only when pregnant (and the boat has sailed on that = one!).  My BP is well-controlled with an ARB (ACE inhibitors work = better, but as a singer the cough they produce is a = dealbreaker).
Sandy

= = --Apple-Mail-92--354379490--

3) From: Floyd Lozano
As a regular watcher of Grey's Anatomy, I would like the add that you two of
the worst things you can do would be to fall in love with a blonde resident,
or take the ferry in to Seattle.  Be careful out there.
-F
On 3/8/07, Sandra Andina  wrote:
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4) From: Sandra Andina
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ROTFL!  Bob went to med school at UW (including Harborview, the  
county hospital), I commuted to Tacoma (SU Law School was then part  
of U. of Puget Sound) for law school and Bellevue to practice, and we  
lived in student housing along the Ship Canal for seven years. A  
favorite cheap evening out would be gazing at the ferries as we sat  
under the heaters on the patio of Ivar's on Alaskan Way, sipping on  
49-cent cups of steaming clam nectar and watching the seagulls scarf  
down French fries the tourists would throw them. (And I took those  
ferries to court in Kitsap County many a time).  I always wonder if  
"Seattle Grace" is an amalgam of Harborview, UW, and Virginia Mason.
On Mar 8, 2007, at 11:54 AM, Floyd Lozano wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
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ROTFL!  Bob went to med school =
at UW (including Harborview, the county hospital), I commuted to Tacoma =
(SU Law School was then part of U. of Puget Sound) for law school and =
Bellevue to practice, and we lived in student housing along the Ship =
Canal for seven years. A favorite cheap evening out would be gazing at =
the ferries as we sat under the heaters on the patio of Ivar's on =
Alaskan Way, sipping on 49-cent cups of steaming clam nectar and =
watching the seagulls scarf down French fries the tourists would throw =
them. (And I took those ferries to court in Kitsap County many a time). =
 I always wonder if "Seattle Grace" is an amalgam of Harborview, UW, and =
Virginia Mason.
On Mar 8, 2007, at 11:54 AM, Floyd Lozano =
wrote:
As a regular = watcher of Grey's Anatomy, I would like the add that you two of the = worst things you can do would be to fall in love with a blonde resident, = or take the ferry in to Seattle.  Be careful out = there. Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.com

= = --Apple-Mail-96--350583382--


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