HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Roasting help (20 msgs / 522 lines)
1) From: DeCambre.Peter
I will be out of the office starting  11/26/2002 and will not return
until 12/02/2002.
I will respond to your message when I return.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: DeCambre.Peter
I will be out of the office starting  11/26/2002 and will not return
until 12/02/2002.
I will respond to your message when I return.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

3) From: neal prentiss
Hi everyone,
I'm new to roasting, I just finished my 3rd batch yesterday using the whirly
pop method.  The first two came out better than most coffee shop coffee I've
had, but I felt I could do better.  My third roast was a Sumatra Mandheling
Classic roasted to FC+.  As soon as it finished cooling I had to try some, I
couldn't wait 24 hours, and it was amazing.  Today, about 24 hours after
roasting, I brewed my second cup expecting it to be better than yesterday's,
but it tasted sour.  I don't know what I did wrong.  For both brews I used a
conical burr grinder on the coarsest setting, a french press, and 200 degree
F water brewed for 3-4 minutes.  The burr grinder is less than a week old so
I know it is still clean.  Can anyone tell me what I did wrong?
One more thing, I'm thinking of upgrading to a Fresh Roast + or an I-Roast
2, or possibly something else if anyone has any suggestions.  But I don't
want to spend more than $200.  Any advice would be much appreciated.
Thank you,
Neal

4) From: Scott Marquardt
Were you sure to purge residual grind before collecting for your
brewing? Many burr grinders' retention is enough to taint a cup with
staleness -- which could come off as sour.
My only counsel for choosing a roaster is to shop for shortcomings
you're willing to live with. Seriously. Read the reviews and poll
folks for the most serious problems with roasters they've owned, and
then decide if your own concerns can accommodate such issues.
- S
On 3/13/07, neal prentiss  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Lynne Biziewski
Hi Neal -
Welcome! You posted the same question I was going to post! I've been
roasting close to a year, and had the same experience with some coffee I
roasted - the first cup (right after roasting - I can never wait) was really
good, but the next day, it was too sharp for my taste buds.
Of course, now I can't remember which type it was...
I can't figure out why it tasted so good at first, and instead of improving
in taste, went downhill.
I did discover a way to cheap last yr, though. I can't afford to waste any
coffee, so if a batch turns out not as good as I'd like, I put it back on
the stove briefly for a very short re-roast. (I roast stove top in a pan).
Usually that will help, even though it may not be perfect.
I would like to know why this happens, though.
Lynne.
On 3/13/07, neal prentiss  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Dave
I don't know why it happens either. But the 2 best cups I've had  were each
immediately after roasting too (one the beans were still warm). I've only
been roasting a couple months. I'm still figuring this all out.
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps

7) From: raymanowen
"The burr grinder is less than a week old so I know it is still clean."
Actually, unless you are grinding in a total vacuum or an inert gas
atmosphere, the coffee grounds are oxidizing/ staling as you grind. All burr
grinders are able to retain upwards of a gram of stale grounds in the grind
path after grinding.
Don't believe me? Try grinding some whole black pepper in your burr grinder
Just Once. Then clean it out a little. Grind some coffee and just see how
your next cup tastes.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
"The indisputable truth is that no coffee is fresh if it isn't fresh
roasted." - - Martin Diedrich

8) From: Diablo
I'll say it.  No one really has.  Sumatra, uhm,,,,it isn't the best or have the
most character.  Mandheling may the best from Sumatra, but that doesn't make it
a great bean.  There's a reason that usually gets the French treatment.  There
isn't much in it to save from the darkness.  I'm not totally dogging Sumatra,
there's just a whole bunch of other beans in the world that beat it by
farrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.
To second you on that, it does seem to be best shortly after roast.  I say
don't get stuck on that bean and find another.  Personally, I roast it to a
Vienna to make blends for those want want dark morning coffees.  That way it
adds depth but isn't the focus of the entire cup.  I use 10% of it in most of
my blends.  Just enough to add and not over power.  
Leo
--- neal prentiss  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Tom Ulmer
Neal-
My opinion would be that it is more than likely under roasted. I have no
experience with this particular Sumatran, but in general, do not be afraid
to take one into second.

10) From: Sandra Andina
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On Mar 13, 2007, at 3:16 PM, neal prentiss wrote:
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Nothing. As with wines, sometimes coffees have a surly "adolescence"  
between delightful taste when newly roasted and the optimal resting  
period. You just need to experiment with each bean to find that sweet  
spot.
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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On Mar 13, 2007, =
at 3:16 PM, neal prentiss wrote:
  Can = anyone tell me what I did wrong? = Nothing. As with wines, sometimes = coffees have a surly "adolescence" between delightful taste when newly = roasted and the optimal resting period. You just need to experiment with = each bean to find that sweet spot. Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-41-96267094--

11) From: Eddie Dove
Neal,
Sandy wrote, "As with wines, sometimes coffees have a surly "adolescence"
between delightful taste when newly roasted and the optimal resting period.
You just need to experiment with each bean to find that sweet spot."
This is sage advice and I have to agree wholeheartedly.  For me, the
Indonesians generally need at least 3-5 days rest and continue to improve
after that.  I just had a cup of the Sumatra Mandheling Blue Batak and it
was exquisite.  I roasted it on March 4 with a long, slow, moderately-ramped
profile that ended whilst tickling 2nd crack; that was the last of what I
had roasted, but there is more in the stash!
What kind of grinder do you have?
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Docendo Discimus
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 3/13/07, neal prentiss  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 3/13/07, neal prentiss  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: miKe mcKoffee
To each there own, one of the benefits of homeroasting. So I'LL say it,
Sumatra is (or can be) a great coffee with great character. If I could only
have ONE variety on hand it'd be Kona, if TWO a Sumatra would be the second.
And I usually roast Sumatra just barely touching 2nd. And it's great rested
like any other bean days later. IMNSHO.
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

13) From: Diablo
True.  Like I said, not knocking it altogether.  If you like earthy over fruits
and the like then I can see Sumatra being high on the list.  It is one of the
best best beans to blend with for certain.  
Leo
--- miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Dan Mouer
Mike, I'm with you. In fact, my most typical daily cup is a blend of Kona 
peaberry and SMs Komodo decaf, whih is mostly Sumatra.
Dan M

15) From: Cameron Forde
Hi Neal,
My guess is that the problem is with the carbon dioxide that is being
released from the beans.  Right after the roast the CO2 levels are low
and you can brew a nice cup.  Over the next couple of days the CO2
levels rise from the natural aging/maturation/staling (pick the term
you are happy with) processes.  This CO2 contributes to the bloom you
probably noticed when you brewed that cup one day after roasting.  It
also lowers the pH (raises the acidity) and contributes to the sour
taste you noticed.  I have a hunch that fast roasts have a bigger
problem with this than with slower roasts and I think that is due to
the faster roaster producing a roasted bean that is more lightly
roasted on the inside than the outside (and if I had to guess, I'd say
that beans with a higher moisture content would be more susceptible to
this issue).  Did you happen to make a note of how long it took to get
to first?  If my hunch is right, you were probably under 7 min.
Cameron
On 3/13/07, neal prentiss  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
ceforde

16) From: Dave
Interesting theory. In one instance for me it was a decaf Mexican bean. I
don't remember what the other was. But in my case, all roasts are fast, I'm
using an unmodified popper. One of these days I'm going to find that variac
I know I have. Then I'll be able to slow my roasts down.
-- 
Dave
Some days...
It's just not worth chewing through the leather straps
On 3/13/07, Cameron Forde  wrote:
<Snip>

17) From: Rich M
Good mornin' Neal-
My comment for you is regarding your choice of a roaster. You may  
have heard it already, but here goes again... buy the best equipment  
you can afford. Case in point: I have an IR2 and have enjoyed the  
learning process (and the results) for about a year. However, I'm now  
looking at upgrading to the Gene Cafe. If you read through some past  
threads, you'll see that almost every roaster has its issues. In my  
case, I want a slower, more even roast that, for me at least, is hard  
to achieve with the IR2.
"Upgrade fever" is a common topic on this list and is a very real  
possibility should you go with a lower-end machine. In my humble  
opinion, why not skip (or at least delay) the onset of this malady  
and go for the best machine you can comfortably afford? Take care,
Rich M
On Mar 13, 2007, at 3:16 PM, neal prentiss wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Wesley Simon
I love Sumatra!  Sumatra mandheling is a fantastic coffee and Blue Batak
currently holds my all time favorite title.
On 3/13/07, Diablo  wrote:
<Snip>

19) From: RK
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Often coffee right out of the roaster are great and the next day they =
taste terrible, It has been my experience especially with Sumatra's that =
at least 72 hrs. rest for it come alive. So be patient and let it rest =
72 to 96 hrs. and try it again.
RK

20) From: Ross
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Ray,
I guess that's why the second shot of the day is always better!  I'm =
going to start running a few sacrificial beans thru each morning.
Ross


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