HomeRoast Digest


Topic: ah sooooohhhhh! (3 msgs / 61 lines)
1) From: brad haire
greetings earthlings...
thanks for the comments re my high altitude roasting
questions...it's good to know that caffeine abuse and
OCD don't disrupt one's sense of humor...yes i will be
landing my glider on the mesa before i rappel down to
harvest my coffee fields...the trip up is the really
tough part!!...on the empirical side i have been 
finding that roasting at 7000 ft is quite
different...temps and times are way different than
ground level protocols...
should anyone have interest let me know...i have found
the panama hacienda and the ethiopian misty mountain
to be especially rewarding when gently developed in
this lower atmospheric pressure...so take notice my
lowland
friends...it's all on the mountain!!!
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2) From: Justin Marquez
On 3/15/07, brad haire  wrote:
<Snip>
We spent 3 weeks last summer in La Veta, CO at 7015 FT. Roasting there
with HG/DB didn't seem much different.  I was worried that the drip
coffee maker's water temp would not be hot enough and would be a
problem, but the coffee tased the same as usual as far as we could
tell.  I actually roasted some at 8300 Ft for the guys starting up the
gas plant I was helping with, and it roasted and brewed just fine
there, too.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

3) From: Brian Kamnetz
I started roasting at 6500 feet at the southern end of the Rockies. I used a
Poppery2,, 3/4 cup of greens, and had trouble initially with "racing"
roasts. Someone on this list (sorry, don't know who) suggested trying 1/3
cup of greens and that did the trick, first crack around 4:30 and
second-crack outliers around 7:30 or 8:00. I eventually moved up to half a
cup.
Moved here to South Carolina, essentially sea level, and had all I could do
to reach second crack at all. A friend had a similar experience, with his
Wisconsin methodology producing a burned, racing roast in Santa Fe.
Brian
On 3/15/07, brad haire  wrote:
<Snip>


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