HomeRoast Digest


Topic: RK Drum Observations (30 msgs / 1295 lines)
1) From: DeCambre.Peter
I will be out of the office starting  11/26/2002 and will not return
until 12/02/2002.
I will respond to your message when I return.
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast

2) From: Frank Coster
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi All,
After several years of Hot Top roasting I decided last December to get =
an RK Drum set up. I wanted to make larger home batches and I wanted to =
dabble in some semi commercial roasts. So many people expressed a desire =
to buy coffee from me that I thought I would see what I could do. My =
initial thought was to buy a Diedrich IR3 which would have set me back =
$10K + and would have me committed to the commercial aspect. Then =
reading info here and other forums I decided to try the RK.
As you have all heard many times and in many venues, dealing with Ron =
was excellent. He answered all my questions thoroughly and promptly via =
email. My set up includes the following;
1) RK 4 LB drum with Commercial motor $425
2) CharBroil Commercial 50K BTU 4 burner BBQ  $300
3) SM's thermocouple K digital thermometer $30
4) Flashing to cover some of the BBQ vents and direct more heat around =
the drum N/C
5) CharBroil Universal Rotisserie for the spit  $45
6) Two OVE gloves  $25
7) 18" Commercial Flour Sieve  $35
8) Two large Patton fans, one for cooling the beans and the other to =
vent the garage. $90
Total Costs: $950 for basically a top of the line set up. It can be done =
for significantly less.
Set Up:
I received the drum and motor from Ron within a week and picked up the =
BBQ at Lowes. Set up was easy for even a somewhat mechanically =
challenged person like myself. I then installed some flashing in the =
rear of the BBQ to cover some of the vents because I noticed that too =
much heat was escaping and any wind would also effect the interior =
temperature radically. I bent some of the flashing inward so it curved =
slightly around the drum. Using some scrap copper tubing I hard mounted =
it into the side of the BBQ and threaded the thermometer thermocouple =
wire though it. Because it is flexible I was able to direct the tip =
approx 3" from the middle of one end of the drum. And lastly I placed =
two 12" X 12" ceramic tiles under the drum and atop the heat deflector =
shields. 
First Roasts:
Thankfully SM's graciously sold me some extra "Ugh" beans so I could =
practice and season the drum. It took several 1 lb roasts for me to be =
feel comfortable with the sounds of the cracks. While not overly loud, =
the RK set up does take some practice to distinguish the cracks. I was =
used to the Hot Top which was very easy to distinguish the sounds. Also =
since you can't see the beans that also caused some initial angst. By =
the fifth roast I was feeling much more comfortable and relied more on =
time, temperature and the amount and smell of the smoke. And by the time =
I had done 10 lbs I felt confident to roast the good stuff.
The Good Stuff:
I just completed 180 lbs of roast since I started and I thought I would =
share some of my profiles and solicit any other information from the =
experienced RK's on the list.
1 Lb Roasts:  pre heat the BBQ with drum inside to 500 degrees. Even =
though the temperature reaches that level within a few minutes , I =
adjust to stay at 500 and let it remain there for at least 10 minutes to =
fully warm all components.  Remove drum and load beans. Install drum =
into BBQ and start motor and timer. I turn down the heat as the heat =
begins to return to normal after opening the lid and allow it to slowly =
reach 460. About 8 minutes into the roast I ease the temp up to 480 and =
hold there until first crack becomes rapid, usually 11 to 12 minutes =
into the roast. I then lower the temp to 420 to 440 until the completion =
of the roast. Usually 14 to 15 min for FC and 16 to 17 min for Vienna.
4 Lb Roasts: pre heat BBQ and drum to 600 degrees for 10 minutes. Load =
beans and slowly allow the temp to reach 570. Ramp up heat to 600 after =
8 minutes. First crack usually starts in 14 to 15 minutes. When cracks =
are rapid I turn down the heat to 540 until roast completion, usually 18 =
to 20 minutes total.
Final Thoughts:
So far I am glad I installed the digital thermometer. It gives me =
instant readings and it is easy to fine tune the temps. Whether that is =
necessary or not I don't know but it makes me feel confident about the =
temp rather than relying on the slow analog thermometer. The profiles =
are pretty much based on recommendations on RK's website and so far they =
have worked well for me. My understanding is that these sized batches =
should roast properly in 13 to 20 minute time frames to avoid baking and =
to prolong time between 1st and 2nd crack for the carmelization I like =
on some beans.
The quality of the coffee produced I feel is at least as good as the =
small Hot Top batches I've made. I still consider myself somewhat of a =
newbie so I think the potential for even better roasts is ahead. The =
only complaint I had about the drum was the door and pin. Heat had =
caused the door to warp slightly and not close properly and the cotter =
pin can be a real b--tch to get out when it's hot. A little fine tuning =
and it is not much of a problem now. I can easily roast 10 lbs an hour =
now, which would take me all day with the Hot Top. Both are excellent =
and I can recommend them highly. I still use the HT for small 1/2 lb =
home batches. But it is very nice to be able to do a pound to 4 pounds =
quickly and efficiently. For people who give coffee away or bring to the =
office etc, the RK in my opinion is excellent.
I invite any and all comments and recommendations, particularly from =
experienced RK'rs,
Cheers,
Frank Coster
frankc12

3) From: Bob
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi Frank,
I have about 150 roasts in my RK, the vast majority being 1-2# loads. =
Follow the same warmup procedures, though I use a sheet of steel as a =
diffuser as opposed to ceramic tiles. Don't know if there is a =
difference in heat retention or not but feel it is key to temp control.
Profile for 540 g. to yield 1# is warmup to 480F as measured by pretty =
good stock gauge on my grill. TC at warmup end will read as high as =
630F, probe centered on drum both axis', about 1.5" off of drum. 
Load drum (only warmup drum if below 40F) and bring TC temp back up to =
470F at 4:00 mark. 1st usually 11-12 minutes in. Do not decrease temp as =
you do, maintain 470F to end of roast. 1st usually lasts about 2 =
minutes, 2nd usually about 3-4 minutes after end of 1st.
Wonder about your lowering the temp after 1st to 440F and would think =
about stalling at that temp, though your elapsed times for specific =
roasts seem right.
Drums Rock!
VegasBob

4) From: Coffeenut
Nice job and report Frank!
I need to do something more with flashing on my grill-roaster too.  The
bottom of my grill was virtually wide-open, so I cut a piece of flashing to
cover that area.  It seems most of the wind effect that disrupts my temps
come when wind is blowing toward the rear of my grill.  The grill exhausts
hot air out the rear in an gap opening between the lid and the base.  When
the wind blows from that direction, it rushes into that opening and lowers
temps by ~ 50-100F until the wind subsides.  If the wind is blowing toward
the front of the grill, there is no effect.  I've also blocked off various
openings and holes around the grill too that helped a little.
Sounds like you've got a nice rig there,
Rick
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5) From: Frank Coster
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi Bob,
I keep hearing about ramping down a little in the temp during 1st to =
extend the time a little to the start of 2nd. I've never had a 1lb batch =
go past 18 min so I don't think I'm going down too low. Supposedly it =
helps bring some more chocolate out particularly from the centrals and =
SA's. That's a character that I like and seems popular with most people =
I roast for. I have to do some FR roasts to keep some of them happy, but =
I rarely go past FC+ on my personal stuff except for some espresso =
blends.
Cheers,
Frank Coster
frankc12
Coral Mustang Wines
www.coralmustang.com

6) From: Frank Coster
Thanks Rick,
Using the flashing I only covered up about 50 to 60% of the venting, and it 
was only in the back. Since the back was most susceptible to wind and I did 
not want to cut off too much air. When I first got the grill I fired it up 
before the Drum installation just to see what the max temp I could get. It 
had trouble reaching 500 degrees even though it is a 50K BTU rig. Now it can 
reach 700. I don't think all grills need the flashing. My food BBQ is a 
Weber Summit and it easily reaches 700 without flashing.
Frank Coster
frankc12
Coral Mustang Wines
www.coralmustang.com

7) From: Les
I did two roasts on my RK this morning.  Both of them were just spot on!
The first was one of last year's Kenya coffees.  Profiles were totally
predictable and the roast stopped at a perfect full city.  The second was a
Panama  ramped up and ended at a wonderful full city.   Thinking about the
push for just going to a Dietrich reminded me that many of the newbies might
not have seen my "Ode to the RK Drum."
ODE TO THE RK DRUM
 My RK drum hides in it heat chamber so ready to roast.
The Charbroil Grill makes such a wonderful host.
The soft patina of gold the stainless steel drum shows
Is a strong reminder of the wonderful roasts that have been exposed.
The lure of the Dietrich my humble roaster can't understand as
My RK works, and works so simply and predictable each time.
As I listen to the swish swish of the beans at 57 rounds per minute and
see my simple timer  keeping me in line to the fire that is inside, I wonder
why,
the lure of the Dietrich can seduce me into such a lie.
My profiles are so clean and predictable, so simple, so easy to control.
How can the glitter and shine and the lines of a Dietrich make me think that
complex and complicated could really be so much better?
When I can roast now without a fetter.
The wonderful smell of the roast before first crack
and viewing the flame through the small hole,
tells me my beans have gotten a loving caress from the roasting
cycle of my RK,
that cannot be improved by Chrome and enamel.
So my dear RK I am back from that horrible lie!
Listening to the music of the pop pop pop of first crack,
the knob of the Charbroil turned down to pull the heat back,
reminds me that with my RK, I have total control to roast the bean
just the way I want to!
What more could anyone want?
Oh Dietrich you are so pleasing to the eye, but I'll just keep enjoying my
RK and not be seduced!
Besides as I sip this fine ristretto, it has to be some of the best coffee
produced!
Why would I want a machine that is much more complex, when my RK roasts my
beans the way I like them best!
Les
On 3/23/07, Frank Coster  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: miKe mcKoffee
Les,
With 20+ years home roasting experience I'd expect virtually all your
roasts, RK Drum or ANY method, to be "spot on" ;-)
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/	From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Les
	Sent: Friday, March 23, 2007 3:01 PM
	
	I did two roasts on my RK this morning.  Both of them were just spot
on!  The first was one of last year's Kenya coffees.  Profiles were totally
predictable

9) From: John F Coffey
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On Mar 23, 2007, at 3:01 PM, Les wrote:
<Snip>
And soon I expect to hear how Les has found a dietrich for $100.00 in  
great shape and they even delivered it to his door for him...
:-{)
--------------
   John F. Coffey
   Email - john
   P.O. Box 524			
   Blaine, WA  98231
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On Mar 23, 2007, =
at 3:01 PM, Les wrote:
I did = two roasts on my RK this morning.á Both of them were just spot on!á = The first was one of last year's Kenya coffees.á Profiles were totally = predictable and the roast stopped at a perfect full city.á The second = was a Panamaá ramped up and ended at a wonderful full city.áá = Thinking about the push for just going to a Dietrich reminded me that = many of the newbies might not have seen my "Ode to the RK Drum." = á
And soon I expect to hear how = Les has found a dietrich for $100.00 in great shape and they even = delivered it to his door for him...
:-{) = --------------ááJohn F. = CoffeyááEmail - johnááP.O. Box 524 = ááBlaine, WAáá98231


= = --Apple-Mail-1-960983460--

10) From: Les
I messed up a roast about 3 months ago.  I wasn't paying attention and I
forgot one of my ramp points and ended up with a Vienna plus roast of a fine
Panama that would have been great at a city roast.  On my last trip, I
stopped at a couple of local espresso shops and was not surprised at the
poor quality of the coffee.  At one hole in the wall shop in Lyons, CO I got
to talking with the Barista, and I commented on the stale coffee.  She got a
little bent out of shape.  I mean she even had a jar with a sign on it,
"support your local Brarista."
 She had an empty grinder next to the full one, so I went out and got some
of my espresso blend and showed her what I liked to drink.  I asked if she
would grind and pull a couple of shots with my coffee just for fun.  Nobody
else was around, so she did.  Her first comment to me was, "How did you
roast that coffee with sugar in it?  Her second comment was, "How come it
isn't bitter".  Her third comment was she wanted to know what I flavored the
coffee with?  We had a 40 minute conversation on roasting and fresh beans.
She never realized what good espresso was.  That LM Linea had never had such
good beans presented to her before.  So, again some of our poorer roasts
(this was a good one) are way better than what you pay $12.00 a pound for.
Les
On 3/23/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Les
John,
I won't tell you what I paid for my RK drum, but I know it is less than the
cash you have in your wallet right now!
 Les
On 3/23/07, John F Coffey  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Coffeenut
Frank,
Your post got me off my rear and I decided to add some aluminum flashing
inside the grill to help deflect wind.  I also added sort of an arched tent
inside the grill lid (over the drum area) to hopefully reflect some heat
back to the drum.  There was a fairly large gap (~10") between the top of
the Grill's lid and my drum.  So, I first took some flashing and pop riveted
it inside the lid.  The flashing is now only a few inches above the top
surface of the drum.  Knowing that the flashing is thin and would want to
droop, I mounted a piece of copper tubing horizontally inside the lid for
the flashing to rest upon.  It also provided some support for the center of
the flashing to pull tight against while I pop-riveted the ends of the
flashing to the lid.
Then, I pop-riveted a second piece of flashing along the length of the rear
inside upper edge of the grill's base.  This flashing comes up about 5" and
contacts the lid's tent flashing (at the rear) when the lid is closed.  It
effectively blocks about 90% of that rear gap where wind was rushing in and
cooling things off.  There's still plenty of areas around the grill for hot
air to exhaust too.  
I decided to burn-in the flashing for about 30 mins before doing a roast and
to see how the flashing would hold up to the heat.  It did very well so far
and I could tell the difference right away against the wind.  The wind had
little effect upon temps and I could tell the grill now get's noticeably
hotter both in start-up and heated modes.
Rick

13) From: Jane Hill
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
<>After reading the "RK Drum" testimonials, my husband did a 'dead' 
coffee sack count. He figures that we have run approximately 3.5 tons of 
beans through our two RK Drums (with commercial motor option).
Our gas BBQ's are the inexpensive 35,000 BTU (Charbroil & Kenmore) 
variety.Other than adding a metal plate heat diffuser, everything else 
is stock (including inaccurate heat thermometers). We have only had to 
replace a few motor couplings and cotter pins, otherwise everything is 
going just fine. 
We live in Alaska and roast outside, summer and winter. We find that 
maintaining roast consistency is a challenge in freezing and windy 
weather. The bottom line is that Ron's drums are the real deal and our 
small business revolves around their quality.

14) From: Floyd Lozano
your small business' quality revolves around in Ron's drums!
On 3/23/07, Jane Hill  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Frank Coster
Rick,
That's exactly what I did and also good idea on burning it in. I'd be a 
little leery of cutting off too much O2 though. Let me know how it works.
Frank Coster
frankc12
Coral Mustang Wines
www.coralmustang.com

16) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
Les,
That is fantastic!
Michael
On Mar 23, 2007, at 6:01 PM, Les wrote:
I did two roasts on my RK this morning.á Both of them were just spot =
on!á The first was one of last year's Kenya coffees.á Profiles were =
totally predictable and the roast stopped at a perfect full city.á The =
second was a Panamaá ramped up and ended at a wonderful full city.áá=
 
Thinking about the push for just going to a Dietrich reminded me that 
many of the newbies might not have seen my "Ode to the RK Drum."
á
ODE TO THE RK DRUM
á
My RK drum hides in it heat chamber so ready to roast.
The Charbroil Grill makes such a wonderful host.
á
The soft patina of gold the stainless steel drum shows
Is a strong reminder of the wonderful roasts that have been exposed.
á
The lure of the Dietrich my humble roaster can't understand as
My RK works, and works so simply and predictable each time.
á
As I listen to the swish swish of the beans at 57 rounds per minute and
see my simple timerá keeping me in line to the fire that is inside, I =
wonder why,
the lure of the Dietrich can seduce me into such a lie.
á
My profiles are soáclean and predictable, so simple, so easy to =
control.
How can the glitter and shine and the lines of a Dietrich make me think =
that
complex and complicated could really be so much better?á
When I can roast now without a fetter.
á
The wonderful smell of the roast before first crack
and viewing the flame through the small hole,
tells me my beans have gotten a loving caress from the roasting
cycle of my RK,
that cannot be improved by Chrome and enamel.
So my dear RK I am back from that horrible lie!
á
Listening to the music of the pop pop pop of first crack,
the knob of the Charbroil turned down to pull the heat back,
reminds me that with my RK, I have total control to roast the bean
just the way I want to!
What moreácould anyone want?
á
Oh Dietrich you are so pleasing to the eye, but I'll just keep enjoying =
my
RK and not be seduced!
Besides as I sip this fine ristretto, it has to be some of the best 
coffee produced!
Why would I want a machine that is much more complex, when my RK roasts =
my
beans the way I like them best!
á
Les
á
On 3/23/07, Frank Coster  wrote: Thanks Rick,
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
<Snip>
a
<Snip>
my 
<Snip>
grill 
<Snip>
<Snip>
blowing 
<Snip>
off 
<Snip>
L. Michael Fraley, MD

17) From: Oaxaca Charly
Jane Hill  wrote:       <>After reading the "RK Drum" testimonials, my husband did a 'dead' coffee sack count. He figures that we have run approximately 3.5 tons of beans through our two RK Drums (with commercial motor option). 
Our gas BBQ's are the inexpensive 35,000 BTU (Charbroil & Kenmore) variety.Other than adding a metal plate heat diffuser, everything else is stock (including inaccurate heat thermometers). We have only had to replace a few motor couplings and cotter pins, otherwise everything is going just fine.  
We live in Alaska and roast outside, summer and winter. We find that maintaining roast consistency is a challenge in freezing and windy weather. The bottom line is that Ronĺs drums are the real deal and our small business revolves around their quality.
 Hi Jane. So you're still lurking here too... I figure I've only roasted about two tons through my latest model RK drum,so far, working solo. I definately had to do some mods with the grill and drum, to improve on available roticerie set ups,(I use Ron's high speed motor) and I have a steel heat diffuser plate, but that's it. I use a large paper clip instead of the cotter pin that Ron provides and it serves me well, so easy to remove quickly. Freezing windy weather is a challenge, especially the windy stuff, but I have done more than a few roasts in minus 30 weather, I just roast a lb. or so less in a batch. One thing about doing this as a comercial business-it's not exactly legal processing food outside on one's porch. Food safety inspectors don't seem to get too exited about it, however.
    Saludos,
   Charly   
---------------------------------
Food fight? Enjoy some healthy debate
in the Yahoo! Answers Food & Drink Q&A.

18) From: Jeremy DeFranco
     Like all other RK owners, I too can not say enough great things about
it. I've been using mine for over 2 months now, and everytime I roast I feel
like I am roasting in a professional roaster. The drum is a pure and simple
work of art. The strength and inside design just flat out beat any attempts
at imitation. When I first got the drum, I expected to see some sort of
"weather vanes" inside to ensure proper agitation. I expected to see a
durable design. I heard so many great things about it that I didn't think it
was possible to be surprised. But what I saw was when I opened the box, and
examined the drum was way over the top- an engineering masterpeice that
words can not even describe! Combine this with the high speed motor and
propane grill, and you've got the all the power and design to be in the same
class with a small high quality shop roaster- at an 1/8 of the price! On top
of all this, I can roast over 4-5 times the amount I was used to roasting in
the Gene Cafe in the same amount of time. What used to take 6-7 hours, and
an entire afternoon w/ the GC, I can do in the RK in about an hour. AND I
can even reach first crack in 10-11 minutes, keeping total roast time to
under 14 minutes if desired- unheard of for the GC, even at low batch
weight! IOW- I have much more maneuverability when it comes to profiling the
roast! I have to agree w/Les, in that I used to dream of some day owning a
Deidrich. Now, I just can't wait until the next time I fire up the RK! Great
job, Ron- I can't thank you enough! Highly recommended!!!
---After reading the "RK Drum" testimonials, my husband did a 'dead'
coffee sack count. He figures that we have run approximately 3.5 tons of
beans through our two RK Drums (with commercial motor option).
Our gas BBQ's are the inexpensive 35,000 BTU (Charbroil & Kenmore)
variety.Other than adding a metal plate heat diffuser, everything else
is stock (including inaccurate heat thermometers). We have only had to
replace a few motor couplings and cotter pins, otherwise everything is
going just fine.
We live in Alaska and roast outside, summer and winter. We find that
maintaining roast consistency is a challenge in freezing and windy
weather. The bottom line is that Ron's drums are the real deal and our
small business revolves around their quality.

19) From: Coffeenut
Frank,
I tell ya, older Grills like the one I'm using have so many places for
oxygen to enter it's no problem still having enough even after the mods.  I
think what we are doing is simply closing up some of the wide open areas
that are not an issue for grilling meats, but are an often reported
aggravation to coffee roasting outdoors. 
I've been grill-roasting for several years (using my modified Alpenrost
drum) and always hope for non-windy days to roast.  Hopefully these mods
will add some roasting pleasure to the "windy roasts".  The good thing is
that all of it can be easily removed and can be re-implemented if a problem
develops down the road.
I'm interested in hearing your experiences from your mods too and would be
happy to compare notes in the future.  If you have another favorite coffee
forum that allows photo attachments, I did take a few pics of the mods and
would be happy to share them there.
Rick

20) From: Aaron Gee
Hello, I am Aaron and I am new to the group. Any ideas would be appreciated. I have been reading the posts and am interested in what is being said about the RK drums. I want to buy a BBQ drum roaster but I have a couple of concerns.
   
  1.  How do you tell when the beans are roasted? I usually stop my roasts before 2nd crack since I like a lighter roasted bean........ but some beans that I roast are better if they are a French roast. How do you determine if the beans are finished roasting when you can not see them and there is not a bean probe?
   
  2. I have heard that similar sized beans can group together if the vanes do not properly agitate the beans. When I looked at the RK drum vanes on the web the vanes appear to be straight. How are the beans moved along the length of the drum without curves or angles in the vanes?
   
  3. When I have read about roasting on the BBQ, one common tip is to cover the flame with a heat deflector made out of ceramic tiles or a sheet of metal. Instead of doing that why not make the drum out of a solid piece of steel? That way no flame could reach the beans, compared to the RK drum which has little holes in it, and then the drum would also serve as the heat deflector. Also the RK drum is made out of stainless steel which is a poor conductor of heat. It seems like steel would take less time and fuel to heat up to the proper tempature.
   
  Please let me know if you think that I am "over roasted". Aaron
Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
       Like all other RK owners, I too can not say enough great things about it. I've been using mine for over 2 months now, and everytime I roast I feel like I am roasting in a professional roaster. The drum is a pure and simple work of art. The strength and inside design just flat out beat any attempts at imitation. When I first got the drum, I expected to see some sort of "weather vanes" inside to ensure proper agitation. I expected to see a durable design. I heard so many great things about it that I didn't think it was possible to be surprised. But what I saw was when I opened the box, and examined the drum was way over the top- an engineering masterpeice that words can not even describe! Combine this with the high speed motor and propane grill, and you've got the all the power and design to be in the same class with a small high quality shop roaster- at an 1/8 of the price! On top of all this, I can roast over 4-5 times the amount I was used to roasting in the Gene
 Cafe in the same amount of time. What used to take 6-7 hours, and an entire afternoon w/ the GC, I can do in the RK in about an hour. AND I can even reach first crack in 10-11 minutes, keeping total roast time to under 14 minutes if desired- unheard of for the GC, even at low batch weight! IOW- I have much more maneuverability when it comes to profiling the roast! I have to agree w/Les, in that I used to dream of some day owning a Deidrich. Now, I just can't wait until the next time I fire up the RK! Great job, Ron- I can't thank you enough! Highly recommended!!! 
---After reading the "RK Drum" testimonials, my husband did a 'dead' 
coffee sack count. He figures that we have run approximately 3.5 tons of 
beans through our two RK Drums (with commercial motor option). 
Our gas BBQ's are the inexpensive 35,000 BTU (Charbroil & Kenmore) 
variety.Other than adding a metal plate heat diffuser, everything else 
is stock (including inaccurate heat thermometers). We have only had to 
replace a few motor couplings and cotter pins, otherwise everything is 
going just fine. 
We live in Alaska and roast outside, summer and winter. We find that 
maintaining roast consistency is a challenge in freezing and windy 
weather. The bottom line is that Ron's drums are the real deal and our 
small business revolves around their quality.
---------------------------------
It's here! Your new message!
Get new email alerts with the free Yahoo! Toolbar.

21) From: Brett Mason
Hi Aaron,
Like most methods, you have to eliminate variables, and be consistent
on the ones which you can control.
  Use a 40000BTU BBQ or better
  Add a high-temp thermometer which measures heat at the level of the bean mass
  Read the profiles on www.rkdrums.com and follow them as a starting point
  Measure your beans first, and be consistent until you have the
process mastered
  Learn to read the temp, time, smell and smoke
Direct flame on the drum can work on a solid stainless steel drum -
it's what I do.  BUT I found better temperature control with a heat
diffuser - I can't really explain why that is, but it is my drum
procedure...
Go gettem!
Brett
On 3/24/07, Aaron Gee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

22) From: Bob
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi Mark,
A good diffuser will limit fluctuations in your TC readout. Also keep =
the end of the probe at least an inch from the drum.
One can also wrap the end of the probe w/foil, keeping the foil off the =
metal ends, sorta like an upside down umbrella.
VegasBob

23) From: Ken Mary
I have not been following this thread, but just came across this LP infrared
heater that could be used as a heat source for a small drum roaster:http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberÉ016--

24) From: Justin Marquez
On 3/25/07, Ken Mary  wrote:
<Snip>
It says it shuts itself off if it gets too hot. I am guessing that it
would not get hot enough to roast.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

25) From: Scott Marquardt
On 3/24/07, Jeremy DeFranco  wrote:
<Snip>
Just to add something I haven't seen discussed (I'm sure I just missed
it), has anyone taken the simple panes to do a Gene-style (eccentric)
mod to an RK? A local fellow did a home-brew grill roaster in the RK
style, but obliqued it.
From what I've seen of an RK, it'd be easy to do but from what I
gather from most RK users, it would also be likely unnecessary.
Thoughts?
- Scott

26) From: Eddie Dove
Hey Scott,
Oddly enough, I thought the same thing today.  From what I can tell though,
it wouldn't be necessary, but I am curious if anyone has tried.
Eddie
-- 
Docendo Discimus
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 3/26/07, Scott Marquardt  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 3/26/07, Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>

27) From:
I have actually thought about it myself. I have some heat safe glass from an old spin-o-fire round fireplace, hmmm, got me thinking again .
ginny
---- Eddie Dove  wrote: 
<Snip>

28) From: Cameron Forde
Is there enough room for the eccentric motion of the drum with a heat
shield in place?
Cameron
On 3/26/07, pchforever  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
ceforde

29) From: Brett Mason
Secret - put vanes inside which are slanted on height... 1/2 in to 1.5
in, the next one reversed...  you don't need to countermount the drum,
just stagger the vanes - will do the work for you...
Brett
On 3/26/07, Cameron Forde  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

30) From: John Moody
Won't that just cause a thicker mound in the center, and few beans at the
ends?
I thought a dead level drum with even bean mass thickness would be best; do
I have that wrong?
John


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