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Topic: iR2 Profile for Decaf (9 msgs / 400 lines)
1) From: Mejia, Carlos
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I just picked up some Komodo Blend decaf beans while visiting SM the
other day. (nice meeting you Tom!)  I've never roasted decaf before and
was surprised to see the color of the beans almost look roasted already.
I will be roasting in a iRoast-2 which (for me) is very difficult to
distinguish the cracks over the loud fan noise.  My set up is in a
utility room, running dryer vent tubing from the iR2 to carry the smoke
through the exhaust fan on the ceiling.  So, since I can't visually
judge my roast level by the color of the beans, the sound of the cracks
or the smoke, how should I roast this bean?   
 
Is there anyone out there with an iR2 who has roasted this bean and can
provide a profile for a set amount of beans that I might try as a
starting point?  ~carlos
 

2) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
Hey Carlos,
I feel the IR2 does not produce that much smoke, being such a small 
amount of greens (or in the case of the decafs... browns) put into it.  =
Maybe for this roast, you could do it in a kitchen under a range hood?  =
Or perhaps forgo the venting for just this roast?  That would at least =
allow you to see (and smell) the smoke and might even make hearing the =
cracks easier.  One piece of advice I have for roasting decafs in an 
IR2 (and it is actually SM Tom's advice on his site) is to leave the 
chaff from a previous roast in the chaff collector while roasting the 
decaf.
Michael
On Mar 23, 2007, at 3:30 PM, Mejia, Carlos wrote:
I just picked up some Komodo Blend decaf beans while visiting SM the 
other day. (nice meeting you Tom!) Ive never roasted decaf before =
and 
was surprised to see the color of the beans almost look roasted 
already. I will be roasting in a iRoast-2 which (for me) is very 
difficult to distinguish the cracks over the loud fan noise. My set =
up 
is in a utility room, running dryer vent tubing from the iR2 to carry 
the smoke through the exhaust fan on the ceiling. So, since I cant =
visually judge my roast level by the color of the beans, the sound of 
the cracks or the smoke, how should I roast this bean? 

Is there anyone out there with an iR2 who has roasted this bean and can =
provide a profile for a set amount of beans that I might try as a 
starting point? ~carlos

L. Michael Fraley, MD=

3) From: Mejia, Carlos
Thanks for the reply Michael.  Actually, my very first roast, last =
December was in my kitchen but I don't have a range hood, (just a vent =
level with the gas burners on my stove and it isn't very strong) and =
kitchen got smokey enough to set off the alarm (plus my "natural" =
goldendoodle alarm... she HATED it). However, I may have been targeting =
too dark, being accustomed to *$ coffee and not knowing better at the =
time. I moved my second roast outdoors but the cold air stalled the =
roast.  So, ever since my 3rd roast I've been venting the smoke up to a =
ceiling fan.  I don't know how much smoke is typical with a nice FC =
roast so I even if I remove the vent, I'm not sure how I would gauge =
from this. If I stop as soon as smoke starts would that be too soon?  Or =
too late?  Thanks for the good advice on keeping the chaff in... I'll =
try that.  ~carlos

4) From: Larry English
Hi Carlos,
  My last iRoast2 batch of Komodo was last July, roasted outside, ambient
temp 73.  It was a 15:00 roast, to what I called FC+.  (The roasted bean=
s
will indeed be very black, even at "lighter" levels.)  Here's the profile:
  400 6:00, 430 4:00, 450 3:00, 470 2:00.  (Temps are programme=
d temps,
and remember that the first three minutes are really at 350.)
  But a very large caveat is in order: results may vary - history on one
man's machine is not a solid indicator of future performance on another's,
given the variables of line voltage, ambient temp (and wind), and the
roaster itself.  You might want to go a little shorter than this on first
batch.  Also, I didn't partially block the outlet screens or leave chaff in
from a previous roast - which explains, perhaps, the length of the roast.
  I still roast Komodo, by the way, but now on the Gene Cafe.  It's a very
versatile decaf, useful as a blender and also very nice on its own.
  Hope this helps,
Larry
On 3/23/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
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5) From: Mejia, Carlos
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
 
Wow... Larry, that's a long hot roast!   How did you judge the 'end' of =
the roast?   Do you use this same profile for other beans and just used =
it for the decaf as well?  It's much hotter than all the profiles that =
I've tried so far.  I'm just wondering where to start on these decafs.  =
The most recent profile that I've been using has been;  320 F  4:00, 420 =
F  3:00, 390 F  8:00 and stopping with 3 to 4 min remaining, for a total =
roast time of 11-12 min.  Does the decaf require a hotter temp?  ~carlos
From: homeroast-admin =
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Larry =
English
Sent: Friday, March 23, 2007 4:12 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +iR2 Profile for Decaf
 
Hi Carlos,
  My last iRoast2 batch of Komodo was last July, roasted outside, =
ambient temp 73.  It was a 15:00 roast, to what I called FC+.  (The =
roasted beans will indeed be very black, even at "lighter" levels.)  =
Here's the profile: 
  400 6:00, 430 4:00, 450 3:00, 470 2:00.  (Temps are =
programmed temps, and remember that the first three minutes are really =
at 350.)
  But a very large caveat is in order: results may vary - history on one =
man's machine is not a solid indicator of future performance on =
another's, given the variables of line voltage, ambient temp (and wind), =
and the roaster itself.  You might want to go a little shorter than this =
on first batch.  Also, I didn't partially block the outlet screens or =
leave chaff in from a previous roast - which explains, perhaps, the =
length of the roast.  
  I still roast Komodo, by the way, but now on the Gene Cafe.  It's a =
very versatile decaf, useful as a blender and also very nice on its own. =
 
  Hope this helps,
Larry 

6) From: Larry English
Hi Carlos,
  Looks like your iRoast2 roasts hotter than mine.  But the decafs do take
longer to get up to temp, which is why the advice to either block part of
the top vent or leave some chaff from a regular roast, to keep the heat in.
But I guarantee that the roast I described was less than Vienna!  On an
earlier, hotter day (83 rather than 73) I stopped it at 13:45 for the=
 same
roast level.  These were outdoors, where I had not checked line voltage
under load, which may have something to do with the length.  But my regular
roasts tend to run around 11-13 minutes, though with a profile more like
350 5:00, 400 4:00, 450 to end.  On the iRoast2, I monitor bean te=
mps
with a TC probe and normally stop the roast at around 455 on the probe f=
or
an FC roast.
  I recall a lot of posts last year indicating high variability with the
iRoast2, indicating the possibility of quality control issues as well as
possible model changes somewhere along the line.
  My suggestion would be to use what works for you with your non-decaf bean=
s
but add a minute or two for decaf - or block the output vents (maybe cover
one with foil).  It will probably take a couple of roasts to nail it.
Larry
On 3/23/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
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7) From: Aaron
As an I roast runs, the chaff created from the cooking process blocks 
the airflow a bit, which keeps the heat in, which gets your beans up to 
temp.
decafs tend to have almost no chaff, ie no heat retention material, and 
will run cool without help.
roast a batch of regular coffee, leave the chaff in the i roast and run 
your decaf and it should run much better..
or
block half of the top screening off with aluminum foil, you can cut a 
small piece and git it up in there to block one of the half moon 
thingies off, and that will keep more heat in to help the decaf reach 
the temp that you have it dialed into.
decafs from what i have seen, you can't really go by color much at first 
since they start out way darker to begin with.. the smells are a bit 
off, the f irst crack tends to be a lot less than most regular beans but 
you CAN hear it if you pay attention.
It takes a bit of getting used to with decafs, but I have found that 
they are a bit more forgiving in the end flavorwise where you stop them 
at unless you really toast em...
give it a few days rest and your decaf will turn out better than 
anything you could ever dream of buying in the store or a 'specialty store'
aaron

8) From: Mejia, Carlos
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hey this helps a lot.  Actually when I was at SM the other day I =
purchased one of their digital thermometers.  I just installed it on my =
iR2 and roasted monitoring the bean mass temp for the first time last =
night.  I stopped the roast when the temp probe hit 455 F and the level =
of roast looked like what I would describe as a FC.  This is consistent =
with what you're describing.  So, I think I'll roast some regular beans =
and save the chaff then roast the decaf till I get a TC reading of 455F.
 
Thanks to all for the advice!
 
~carlos
From: homeroast-admin =
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Larry =
English
Sent: Friday, March 23, 2007 5:38 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +iR2 Profile for Decaf
 
Hi Carlos,
  Looks like your iRoast2 roasts hotter than mine.  But the decafs do =
take longer to get up to temp, which is why the advice to either block =
part of the top vent or leave some chaff from a regular roast, to keep =
the heat in.  But I guarantee that the roast I described was less than =
Vienna!  On an earlier, hotter day (83 rather than 73) I stopped =
it at 13:45 for the same roast level.  These were outdoors, where I had =
not checked line voltage under load, which may have something to do with =
the length.  But my regular roasts tend to run around 11-13 minutes, =
though with a profile more like 350 5:00, 400 4:00, 450 to end. =
 On the iRoast2, I monitor bean temps with a TC probe and normally stop =
the roast at around 455 on the probe for an FC roast. 
  I recall a lot of posts last year indicating high variability with the =
iRoast2, indicating the possibility of quality control issues as well as =
possible model changes somewhere along the line.
  My suggestion would be to use what works for you with your non-decaf =
beans but add a minute or two for decaf - or block the output vents =
(maybe cover one with foil).  It will probably take a couple of roasts =
to nail it. 
Larry
On 3/23/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
 
Wow... Larry, that's a long hot roast!   How did you judge the 'end' of =
the roast?   Do you use this same profile for other beans and just used =
it for the decaf as well?  It's much hotter than all the profiles that =
I've tried so far.  I'm just wondering where to start on these decafs.  =
The most recent profile that I've been using has been;  320 F  4:00, 420 =
F  3:00, 390 F  8:00 and stopping with 3 to 4 min remaining, for a total =
roast time of 11-12 min.  Does the decaf require a hotter temp?  ~carlos
 

9) From: Floyd Lozano
i am jealous of you folks that can just pop in to SM ;)  Anyone tried to
clip or attach a thermometer to a dogbowl to monitor temp of the beans?
Might be easier if I can get this bread machine working as an agitator. I
kinda took it apart to remove some suspect looking rubberish parts and some
sort of white grease from the area underneath the paddle.  We'll see if she
still holds together long enough to burn some goo goo muck...
-F
On 3/23/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
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