HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT - Vietnam (17 msgs / 572 lines)
1) From: Coffee Kid
Greetings all,
I am in need of some advice from engineer types and anyone living outside of Sweet Marias green coffee circles. It seems a move to Vietnam is imminent for the family and me.  Here are my questions:
1. Does anyone know the likelihood of obtaining quality green beans at a reasonable price in Asia?
2. Should I even bother using limited "allowed moving weight" on my Sylvia, MACAP, IRoast, etc.? Relates to #1
3. Has anyone ever used voltage converter on high wattage items? I would like to take my cuisinart and blender and maybe Sylvia.
Thanks for any and all advice?
Tom
Actually, now as I write this I realize I will be in the states atleast once a year. I could fill a suitcase full of green beans.  Has anyone ever attempted to walk through airport customs with greens? (I imagine every country is different)
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2) From:
Take whatever you can stuff in a suitcase, pack into boxes...
if this is work related they should have no issue sending your stuff.
I would buy some greens before I left for sure.
g
---- Coffee Kid  wrote: 
<Snip>

3) From: raymanowen
I'm no jet- setter, but the following is a bad choice: "I could fill a
suitcase full of green beans." Then you couldn't lift it-
Suppose 2 or 3 different security or customs agents are somewhat curious as
to why you're straining with the suitcase and dolly-
[International flights used to be extremely narrow minded about a 70# total
baggage limit per passenger- Pax] They'd never let you fly with a bag so
heavy.
"Open it up, please. Hmmm- I see... Exactly what do you have buried in the
beans? Show me..."
First, you go to jail. Then they determine exactly what Q? they had in mind.
Wanted to make your flight connections? Do not count on it. Hope the rest of
your family is carrying their Passports and reservation Itineraries,
otherwise they'll join you in jail.
You had better contact the people presenting you with the travel
opportunity, or the State Department re: travel restrictions and power
availability at specific locations in country.
The people sending you should take the responsibility for getting you safely
moved. Unless you're the first one or the Lone Ranger, they've done it
before and already have current solutions for the problems before you and
your family even encounter them.
Many Asians love their coffee but can only afford instant. Do you really
want to go over and live like a King? That has always been the American Way.
I guess nothing's changed...
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Forewarned is forearmed-

4) From: derbyrm
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
After I wrote the following, I googled the question.  According to =http://globaledge.msu.edu/IBRD/CountryIntro.asp?CountryID=179&RegionID==3  where Vietnam has electricity, they use 120/240 vac, just as we do.  =
Maybe you'd best wait to see what's available at your lodging before =
spending dollars and pounds (weight).
If they use 240 vac or 208 vac in Vietnam, then you'll need a step-down =
transformer rated for that input and with an output amperage rating at =
least as great as that called for by the equipment you intend to use.  =
(If you only have the wattage of the load device, divide that by 120 to =
get the amps.) (Yeah, I know that ignores the power factor, but most =
transformers are pretty rugged.)
e.g. =http://cgi.ebay.com/3000-Watt-Step-Up-and-Down-Transformer-110V-220V_W0QQ=itemZ170091028903QQcategoryZ42881QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
Roger
derbyrm http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm

5) From: Michael Wascher
"120/240" may not be "just as we do". In South Korea this means that they
have 240V in most areas, some areas (including most tourist hotels) also
have 120 V available, but not the 3 wire 120/240V split supply used in the
US. My search for Vietnam resulted in mixed results. Some sites indicate
120/240 and others indicate just 240
V.
The USPS web site lists shipping restrictions to other countries. The level
of information & content varies since it is supplied by the destination
countries. The list for Vietnam is very short:
https://sss-web.usps.com/gxg/jsps/lr_showGenRest.jsp. Coffee is not listed
... but what is "ice, blue"? Whatever it is, don't take it!
The US state dept web site is a good source for info :http://www.state.gov/g/drl/rls/hrrpt/2002/18270.htmOn 3/25/07, derbyrm  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but
planning is indispensable." --Dwight D. Eisenhower

6) From: Aaron
don't forget the frequency... if they are on 50 Hz and not 60 hz, your 
motors will spin slower, ie fans blow slower and over heat faster..  
small chance for something that has a computer like an I roast, it might 
malfunction, or not count  the time correctly if it's using the line 
input as it's timer for the clock.  granted it's only a few seconds, but 
other probs might happen too.
a suitcase full of beans, you probably won't be able to carry it very 
well.. ie heavy.
Green coffee beans  technically fall under the title of 'produce' ie 
grown in (insert blank here)..
most places won't allow you to bring it into the country for fear of 
whatever buggaboo is infesting on that day. or they will make you go 
through the whole customs thing, ie big hastle...  sometimes they look 
the other way, but theres a big difference between a 2 pound bag and a 
45 pound suitcase full...
good luck on whatever you try with this.
aaron

7) From: raymanowen
"If they use 240 vac or 208 vac in Vietnam, then you'll need a step-down
transformer..."
Are you a shill for a transformer seller?
If you have 240 or 208vac, you already Have 120vac in your hand.
240v is one leg of a Delta three phase power system. One of the 240v
distribution transformer windings is center tapped, connected to the 120v
Neutral line. Either of those 240v legs will measure 120v to neutral. NTR.
The other leg is the 277v "Wild leg," and is only found in industrial areas
in the US.
208v is the potential between any two legs in a Wye three phase power
system. Any of the 208v legs will measure 120vac to Neutral. NTR.
But maybe I'm rong. Maybe they, like the Europeans and most of the rest of
the sane world, save copper by distributng only 208 or 240v at half the
current with no Neutral line at all.
We're the only Copper hogs with 120v toys.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Always carry a cheap DVM- $4 @ Big Box & hardware stores
On 3/25/07, derbyrm  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

8) From: Derek Bradford
On 3/26/07, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
Play fair Ray...  that's not an American thing, unless you count the
US bases.  Every person I've ever met who's moved to another country
has tried their damnedest to bring at least some of the comforts of
home....it's about trying to feel yourself in a strange place, not
living like a king.
Some of the biggest problems involve trying to figure out what you can
and cannot get in your new home.
I suppose I didn't bring anything with me to Korea, but I've traveled
a lot and I know what I need to be happy.  But that's now.  The first
time I moved to another country it was Cuba, and I brought everything
I could, right down to my clock radio.  Seems dumb now, but then I
couldn't imagine any other way.
Did you get my note about the oven?
Cheers,
--Derek

9) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
True enough, Derek.  Especially when most of us take our coffee with us 
when we travel.  Here we are.. living like KINGS (or QUEENS) when the 
rest of the peasants have to drink hotel coffee, or Charbucks!  (Tongue 
firmly in cheek.)
Michael
On Mar 25, 2007, at 10:27 PM, Derek Bradford wrote:
On 3/26/07, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
Play fair Ray...  that's not an American thing, unless you count the
US bases.  Every person I've ever met who's moved to another country
has tried their damnedest to bring at least some of the comforts of
home....it's about trying to feel yourself in a strange place, not
living like a king.
Some of the biggest problems involve trying to figure out what you can
and cannot get in your new home.
I suppose I didn't bring anything with me to Korea, but I've traveled
a lot and I know what I need to be happy.  But that's now.  The first
time I moved to another country it was Cuba, and I brought everything
I could, right down to my clock radio.  Seems dumb now, but then I
couldn't imagine any other way.
Did you get my note about the oven?
Cheers,
--Derek

10) From: raymanowen
On 3/25/07, Derek Bradford  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

11) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-34--992315579
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On Mar 25, 2007, at 4:06 PM, raymanowen wrote:
<Snip>
Cohen the Smuggler has been eluding Customs for years, specifically  
one Agent Smith (who has taken on an Inspector-Javert-like obsession  
with catching this particular Jean Valjean).  Smith knows that some  
funny business has been going on, but can never catch Cohen in the  
act of smuggling--every time he'd examined his luggage, everything  
was legitimate and either well under the duty limit or fully declared  
and duty paid for.
One day Smith gets an anonymous tip that Cohen will be arriving on a  
1:15 p.m. flight into JFK from Montego Bay, bearing 75# of Jamaica  
Blue Mt. coffee beans on which he has no intention of paying duty.   
Eager with anticipation, he rushes to his station just past  
Immigration/Passport Control, rubbing his hands in glee at the  
prospect of finally nabbing his quarry after all these years.  At  
precisely 1:30, Cohen clears Passport Control; Smith spots him  
sweating and panting as he laboriously drags a large vinyl suitcase  
on tiny wheels, obviously bulging to capacity, by a small leash.
"Afternoon, Mr. Cohen," says Smith. "Welcome home. How was Jamaica?"
"How should it be?" replies Cohen, "HOT!"
"I can see that," answers Smith, "got anything to declare?"
"Yeah," replies Cohen, "it's still so hot I'm schvitzing," as he  
wipes his brow for emphasis.
"So I see," nods Smith. "So what's in the suitcase?"
"Bird food," answers Cohen, deadpan.
"BIRD FOOD???" asks Smith. "Mr. Cohen, please open the suitcase."
Cohen shrugs, heaves the valise up on to the steel examination table,  
and unzips it. There, inside the bag, is one lone item: a very large  
burlap bag stenciled "Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee, Certified  
Wallensford Estate."
("Now I've finally got him--this is the proof I need," thinks Smith  
delightedly). He maintains his composure as he asks, with ever so  
slight a degree of disdain and triumph,"Oh, come now, Mr. Cohen,  
surely you don't expect me to believe birds eat expensive coffee  
beans, do you?"
"Nu," Cohen shrugs, "if they want, they'll eat; if they don't, they  
won't."
(From A Treasury of Jewish Humor, edited by Leo Rosten)
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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On Mar 25, 2007, =
at 4:06 PM, raymanowen =
wrote:
I'm no jet- setter, = but the following is a bad choice: "I could fill a suitcase full of = green beans." Then you couldn't lift it- Suppose 2 or 3 different = security or customs agents are somewhat curious as to why you're = straining with the suitcase and dolly-  [International flights = used to be extremely narrow minded about a 70# total baggage limit per = passenger- Pax] They'd never let you fly with a bag so heavy.  "Open it up, please. = Hmmm- I see... Exactly what do you have buried in the beans? Show = me..."  Cohen the Smuggler has been eluding Customs for years, specifically = one Agent Smith (who has taken on an Inspector-Javert-like obsession = with catching this particular Jean Valjean).  Smith knows that some = funny business has been going on, but can never catch Cohen in the act = of smuggling--every time he'd examined his luggage, everything was = legitimate and either well under the duty limit or fully declared and = duty paid for.
One day Smith gets an = anonymous tip that Cohen will be arriving on a 1:15 p.m. flight into JFK = from Montego Bay, bearing 75# of Jamaica Blue Mt. coffee beans on which = he has no intention of paying duty.  Eager with anticipation, he = rushes to his station just past Immigration/Passport Control, rubbing = his hands in glee at the prospect of finally nabbing his quarry after = all these years.  At precisely 1:30, Cohen clears Passport Control; = Smith spots him sweating and panting as he laboriously drags a large = vinyl suitcase on tiny wheels, obviously bulging to capacity, by a small = leash. 
"Afternoon, Mr. Cohen," = says Smith. "Welcome home. How was Jamaica?"
"How should it be?" replies = Cohen, "HOT!"
"I can see that," answers = Smith, "got anything to declare?"
"Yeah," replies Cohen, = "it's still so hot I'm schvitzing," as he wipes his brow for = emphasis.
"So = I see," nods Smith. "So what's in the suitcase?"
"Bird food," answers Cohen, = deadpan.
"BIRD = FOOD???" asks Smith. "Mr. Cohen, please open the = suitcase."
Cohen shrugs, heaves the = valise up on to the steel examination table, and unzips it. There, = inside the bag, is one lone item: a very large burlap bag stenciled = "Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee, Certified Wallensford = Estate."
("Now = I've finally got him--this is the proof I need," thinks Smith = delightedly). He maintains his composure as he asks, with ever so slight = a degree of disdain and triumph,"Oh, come now, Mr. Cohen, surely you = don't expect me to believe birds eat expensive coffee beans, do = you?"
"Nu," = Cohen shrugs, "if they want, they'll eat; if they don't, they = won't."
(From A = Treasury of Jewish Humor, edited by Leo Rosten)

Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-34--992315579--

12) From: raymanowen
Rong button again-
In the military, our group was known as The Mob, we were Mobsters and our
black hats had the logo "First in/ Last out." Col. Bertie, our Commander at
Clark, hated the image we worked hard to promote. Sensitivity training for
us, often the first Americans to visit an area other than religious
missionaries, amounted to, "Don't flaunt your Dollars."
We GI's didn't have many dollars, but in their currency we might have been
walking around with a years' wages in our pockets, blowing it on Singhai,
Puying, Temple bells and Kodachrome film.
I don't know who's zooming whom, but I lived like a King drawing $18/day per
diem. My most outlandish day included a Fabulous dinner and an evening at
the Crown Club in the penthouse of the Firestone Building on Sukhumvit
Blvd., cost just $5. The whole day, including Baht bus fare. Actually 102
Baht- I used a couple I already had with me.
I have Hmong and Vietnamese friends that came clear to the States in
glorified row boats. My Thai friends all have something to do with Bakeries
and Coffee shops. I don't think they came in boats, but they got here by the
skin of their teeth, nonetheless.
Hul is now Americanized. A couple of months ago, she said , "Coffee and a
donut, Ray? My treat."
"Sure"
"Remember the SUV we talked about?"
"Oh, you didn't get the Hummer, did you?" (I hadn't seen it in the lot out
front of their coffee/ donut shop.)
"Not exactly-" and she took me out and showed me the silver/ gray metallic
735i with 24 miles on both odometers.
Her husband, Min, drives the BMW SUV. (SAV?)
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Could I roast for  Hul, Hong  or Jaruwan- 3 different coffee shops?

13) From: Michael Wascher
What you are describing is some US industrial standards. It isn't what you
have in residential areas where the two phases are 180 degrees out of phase,
not the 120 degrees you have in a 3 phase system.
What you describe will not be found in a country that uses 240VAC.
BTW: The US still has 120V because we already had big-ticket items that ran
on 120VAC. Other countries (almost all of which once had 120 VAC) were able
to upgrade their systems to 240 VAC because their customers only had to
replace some light bulbs. we're gradually inching up, increasing voltage
from 100VAC to today's 120VAC. It'l be some time before we reach 240VAC,
though!
On 3/25/07, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"In preparing for battle I have always found that plans are useless, but
planning is indispensable." --Dwight D. Eisenhower

14) From: Coffee Kid
Thanks to all on the replies to my inquiries. We have amassed a lot of "stuff" that we will be leaving behind but I can't do the instant coffee.
P.S. Anyone want to buy a house on Florida's Gulf Coast?
Cheers,
Tom
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15) From: raymanowen
"Anyone want to buy a house on Florida's Gulf Coast?"
Just you watch- If I were to do that, all the US Meteorologists would have a
convention to discuss the feasibility of a natural Hook Shot on the next
hurricane that got up to the R's...
"...I can't do the instant coffee."
I understand they're cultivating Arabicas in the Highlands. I got some RVN
coffee once that had tantalizing, almost perfumy fruit hints in the cup, and
it wowed my Celtic Critic from the press pot.
I had gotten stupid and roasted five popper roasts to fill a fruit jar. I
had just done the same with Kenya AA and some Guatemala Antigua. They were
great, and I was ignoring the RVN, trying to perfect grinding and brewing of
the others.
I thought of trying the alleged Robusta in whatever expresso thing I had at
the time. I changed my mind when I popped the lid on the fruit jar.
Eau de Dragstrip!
I let the gophers in the compost pile deal with the rest of that...
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

16) From: Michael Dhabolt
Ray.
raymanowen wrote:
*>alleged Robusta<*
*>Eau de Dragstrip!<*
Where is that spew alert.  Sometimes......you get it exactly right ;~)
Mike (just plain)

17) From: raymanowen
After the wonderful flavor initially, it broke my heart. With better roast
control, I'll try to find it again.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
(Expletive deleted)


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