HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: apologies (36 msgs / 656 lines)
1) From: stereoplegic
seriously, didn't mean to insult anybody's beliefs, mine are just as 
strong as anyone else's. just different than those of many, so i prefer 
to keep them to myself. this list is not about religious bickering, and 
even i get in a bad mood when it turns to that. sorry for taking a jab 
on the french roast thread.

2) From: stereoplegic
still not apologizing for the french thing though (no caps)... ;-). hate 
W all you want, dump our budweiser (won't cap that either), i'll even 
help as long as i don't have to pay for it, just don't call us all 
stupid Americans. and no, i don't hate all French, just the french who 
chose to live up to stereotypes (and those bastards that commit coffee 
genocide... be gentle with those beans!) ok, just trying to cheer myself 
up on this one.
stereoplegic wrote:
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3) From: Lynne Biziewski
O.K..........
Think I missed something... have no idea what you are talkilng about -
searched to see what messages I may have missed, but came up w/nothing (and
can't understand why you don't want to capitalize 'French,' except maybe
that you have fallen for the PR of the media...). But, I think your family
here knows that you are a good person - so don't worry.. (as long as you
don't take offense if I hate W & want to pour that g-d awful Bud down the
drain, along w/countless other crap that are produced by the huge,
former-US-now-'Global' corporations).
(All this is making me ponder - are the French are any more to blame for
'French Roast' than our own Charbucks? Do they actually burn their beans in
France, or is the term made up by our own country, like 'French' fries -
which have NOTHING to do w/France... sigh... inquiring minds want to
know...)

4) From: Aaron
I doubt the French burn their beans over there.  Roasting a bean that 
dark takes more time than a regular roast, and their laws prohibit them 
from doing a full workday so it'd be illegal for them to put the extra 
time or effort into roasting that dark.
Probably someone had an espresso or something in france many many years 
ago, and the beans actually came from somewhere else, BUT.... since they 
had the beverage in france, let's call it french.
French toast anyone?
aaron

5) From: Derek Bradford
On 3/27/07, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>
Did you know that the French for French toast is 'pain perdu'?  Lost
toast...  The first time I used an aging baguette to make French toast
I was stunned--best I'd ever had--and now I deliberately make French
toast with aging baguette-shaped bread (improved texture with a good
amount of crust area).  Didn't learn about pain perdu until a couple
weeks ago, but it makes perfect sense.
Stereoplegic...  Publicly stating you hate broad numbers of a given
country simply because you disagree with their politics is pretty
shaky territory...Do you hate everyone who holds a different opinion
than your own?
--Derek

6) From:
Derek:
you are correct, I love Paris and the French friends I have are wonderful.
using an aging baguette is great, try a two gay old plus loaf of sour dough, cut at least 1 1/2" the sour dough is fabulous, you can add a tiny bit of olive oil to the pan along with butter, not stick, no after taste just wonderful French Toast!!
ginny
---- Derek Bradford  wrote: 
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7) From: miKe mcKoffee
Just curious, does straight old sour dough make as good pan pardue as gay
old sour dough? ;-) Hmmm, if you cut a gay sour dough loaf straight is it
still gay?
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
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8) From: Derek Bradford
Nice...
On 3/27/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
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9) From: Justin Marquez
On 3/27/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
Who knows... maybe the old "choice" vs. "genetic" question could
finally be answered...
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

10) From:
straight or gay (a little light in the loafers my Grandmother would say), makes no difference.But perhaps to an uber-chef like yourself you would go eeeekkk at a gay loaf!
ginny
---- miKe mcKoffee  wrote: 
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11) From: Tom Ulmer
If it's old, does it still rise to the occasion?
And what exactly is pardue?
On 3/27/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
Just curious, does straight old sour dough make as good pan pardue as gay
old sour dough? ;-) Hmmm, if you cut a gay sour dough loaf straight is it
still gay?
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee

12) From:
sure Tom, you can always add a pinch of viaga powder!
g
---- Tom Ulmer  wrote: 
<Snip>

13) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
Not really understanding the transition from french roast to "the 
French" here... you definitely would not want anyone to find 
significance between american roast (yes, there is one, extremely 
light "east coast" roast style done mostly to minimize weight loss) 
and Americans (I guess we mean N. Americans, but there are other 
ones). If you have to find some "meaning" behind the term french 
roast, I guess I can think of a couple:
w. african colonies: french had good access to low grown robusta 
coffees. overroasting them was a way to avoid the awful flavor of the 
greens
cafe au lait: dark roast is sweetned with milk to make it palatable
"street roasting" : had a strong following in france - coffee roasted 
over charcoal in little tin hand turned roasters - this was pure 
conduction roasting with little control -easy to scortch and burn.
Still - i dont see what any of thesehave to do with the French as a 
people, but hope this adds some substance to the definition
Tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

14) From: Lynne Biziewski
Merci, Tom, merci, si vous plait...
; > } )
Lynne
(nor do I want anyone to associate 'Boston Baked Beans' with
Boston..... whodoes eat that stuff, anyway?? Certainly not anyone I
know here in Boston!)
On 3/27/07, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee 
wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Larry Johnson
My father-in-law, lifetime resident of the South Shore. Likes 'em for
breakfast.
What about Boston Cream Pie?
On 3/27/07, Lynne Biziewski  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please
bring me some coffee.
  - Abraham Lincoln

16) From: Sandy Andina
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And once the bread is too stale even for that, you can resurrect it  
as the basis for a panzanella (Italian bread salad).  Break up the  
baguette into chunks and soak it in hot water till it softens and you  
can smoosh it.  Chop up some tomatoes, onions, and flat leaf parsley  
(basil too if you can get it, but unnecessary). Toss with the bread,  
grated parmesan, romano, and/or asiago cheese and lots of olive oil  
and red wine (NOT balsamic) vinegar.  Add kidney or cannellini beans  
for more variety.  Let sit at least several hrs. if not overnight.  
That and ramen noodles got us through our grad/professional student  
years.
On Mar 27, 2007, at 8:47 AM, pchforever wrote:
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Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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And once the bread is too stale =
even for that, you can resurrect it as the basis for a panzanella =
(Italian bread salad).  Break up the baguette into chunks and soak it =
in hot water till it softens and you can smoosh it.  Chop up some =
tomatoes, onions, and flat leaf parsley (basil too if you can get it, =
but unnecessary). Toss with the bread, grated parmesan, romano, and/or =
asiago cheese and lots of olive oil and red wine (NOT balsamic) =
vinegar.  Add kidney or cannellini beans for more variety.  Let sit =
at least several hrs. if not overnight. That and ramen noodles got us =
through our grad/professional student years.
On Mar 27, =
2007, at 8:47 AM, pchforever =
wrote:

Did you know that the French for French toast is 'pain = perdu'?  Lost

=

toast...  The first time I used an = aging baguette to make French toast

I was stunned--best I'd ever had--and now I = deliberately make French

toast with aging baguette-shaped bread (improved texture with = a good

amount of = crust area).  Didn't = learn about pain perdu until a couple

weeks ago, but it makes perfect = sense

Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-46--857070749--

17) From: Lynne Biziewski
Mmmm - Boston Cream Pie...
but baked beans for breakfast!? ugh.. (but then I like black beans,
garbanzos, but not the sweet, sweet bean variety.. Then again, both my ex's
liked them - the exhusband & exboyfriend. Maybe it's an old Bostonian male
thing??
....something else to ponder...

18) From: Lynne Biziewski
Oh, yes - that type of salad is so, so good - except I would use white
balsamic vinegar instead of wine vinegar, and garbanzo beans. And
artichokes. Love artichokes in my salad... (when I can afford them).  Mmmm -
I'm getting hungry..
Or cut up the bread in thin slices, sprinkle w/some olive oil & parmesan
cheese, bake til crisp, & voila! Delish croutons for a salad!
Lynne
On 3/27/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
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19) From: Sandy Andina
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I haven't had it in years, since I ate it at the place it was  
invented: the Dining Room at the Copley Plaza.  Unbelievable. Had it  
many times at various diners when I was a kid, but there was just  
something about the way that place married the sponge cake, custard,  
and chocolate icing.
On Mar 27, 2007, at 1:36 PM, Lynne Biziewski wrote:
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Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
--Apple-Mail-49--854261617
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I haven't had it in years, since =
I ate it at the place it was invented: the Dining Room at the Copley =
Plaza.  Unbelievable. Had it many times at various diners when I was a =
kid, but there was just something about the way that place married the =
sponge cake, custard, and chocolate icing.  
On Mar 27, =
2007, at 1:36 PM, Lynne Biziewski wrote:
Mmmm - Boston Cream = Pie...  Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-49--854261617--

20) From: stereoplegic
ok guys and gals, i was just having fun w/ that one, that's all. i used 
to hate W too, now i just feel sorry for him. how many of those 
decisions do you think are actually his? and no, i don't hate the FRENCH 
(just "french" roast) i do hate budweiser though. ;-)
lynnebiz wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: Aaron
I thought once bread got too stale and turned into a brick, that's where 
crutons came from  ::shrug::

22) From: Aaron
careful about hating W... if you turn M&M's upside down they become 
W's...we can't hate a classic like that now can we?? 
This alphabetical message brought to you by the number  8....

23) From: Lynne Biziewski
There's no such thing as bread too stale: take the stale loaf, wet a bit
w/water - put in hot oven until it's 'fresh' again.
Or.. make some tasty croutons.
Nothing goes to waste in my house.
Lynne
On 3/27/07, Aaron  wrote:
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24) From:
or dip it into a pot of gruel you have on the stove, hell that old stuff stands up by itself and always tastes GREAT...
thanks Lynne.
g
---- Lynne Biziewski  wrote: 
<Snip>

25) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 3/27/07, Lynne Biziewski  wrote:
<Snip>
I'm assuming that mold is a different issue from "stale"?
Brian

26) From: Lynne Biziewski
OK, you got me. I do stay away from green bread (unless it's St. Patrick's
day, I guess).
Lynne
On 3/27/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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27) From: Angelo
Didn't he run against Clinton and BushI?
<Snip>

28) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
Oh Dear ginny!  Now we are moving on to homophobia!  (Or I guess 
homophilia since you are recommending the gay bread.)  (Tongue very 
much in cheek!)  ;-)
Michael
On Mar 27, 2007, at 9:47 AM,  wrote:
  try a two gay old plus loaf of sour dough,
L. Michael Fraley, MD

29) From: Brian Kamnetz
Lynne,
I would have been surprised to find that moldy bread was included, but I've
been surprised before and thought I would ask. Thanks for the response.
Brian
On 3/27/07, Lynne Biziewski  wrote:
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30) From: Larry Johnson
On 3/27/07, Angelo  wrote:
<Snip>
No, he's the governor of Georgia.
On 3/27/07, Angelo  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please
bring me some coffee.
  - Abraham Lincoln

31) From:
Michael:
thanks for sending. I just realized I misspelled day...
oh will,
gin
---- "L. Michael Fraley wrote: 
<Snip>

32) From: Mejia, Carlos
Who's will?

33) From:
A great friend of "well".
ginny
---- "Mejia wrote: 
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34) From: Scott Marquardt
Whose swill?
On 3/29/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
<Snip>

35) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
Did well go to school in Kentucky?  I think I know him!
Michael
On Mar 30, 2007, at 12:37 PM,  wrote:
A great friend of "well".
ginny
---- "Mejia wrote:
<Snip>

36) From:
no close,
g
well go to school in Kentucky?  I think I know him!
<Snip>


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