HomeRoast Digest


Topic: finding the right brew temperature (10 msgs / 290 lines)
1) From: Clifton Burkett
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What methods do you use to find the correct brew temperature when you  
are pulling shots for a new bean ? Pull a few shots above and below a  
given temperature? I have a Giotto so for me the middle temperature  
spot being when the steam just stops coming out of the brew group.
Clif - SomeWhere in Florida
with Rocky the Cardi and Garfield the Tabby
Odie PWC at the Bridge 01/18/2006http://www.freewebs.com/aesk/inmemoriam.htm--Apple-Mail-9--821353215
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What methods do you use to = find the correct brew temperature when you are pulling shots for a new = bean ? Pull a few shots above and below a given temperature? I have a = Giotto so for me the middle temperature spot being when the steam just = stops coming out of the brew group.
Clif - SomeWhere in Floridawith Rocky the Cardi and Garfield the = TabbyOdie PWC at the = Bridge 01/18/2006
">http://www.freewebs.com/aesk/inmemoriam.htm=="=" class="3D"khtml-block-placeholder"">
= --Apple-Mail-9--821353215--

2) From: Michael Dhabolt
Cliff,
Clifton Burkett wrote:
<Snip>
I'm not familiar with the Giotto, but for most HX machines, your 'middle
temperature spot' would be around 206 F.
I usually 'flush' until 3, 4, 5, or 6 seconds past the cessation of the
steam 'hiss'.  Use that temp as a reference and bracket it by a couple of
seconds each way.  sharp acrid = too hot.......sour = too cool.  Keep
bracketing until you find what you like - your sweet spot won't necessarily
be the same as the next guys.......but usually pretty close.  Time
consuming, and it makes for a serious caffeine buzz, and really worthwhile -
in the cup.  It is amazing how few espresso shops follow this regime.....and
how impressed they are when they figure out how they should have been doing
it all along.  There are a few other tricks to tune the machine, after
you've found the temperature that you want to pull at.
I currently have the benefit of a Scace ThermoFilter and logging TC
thermometer (expensive and useful toys).  I did, however, develop my
flushing technique prior to the acquisition of these toys.  Checking my
flushing technique with this instrumentation......I usually pull at 201 F to
203 F dependent upon the particular blend.  By being dogmatic with 'flush'
timing I was surprised to find that I come in consistently within 1/2 degree
F.
Another great piece of instrumentation, if you don't need portable and the
ability to use it on different machines, and if your Giotto has an E-61
group head is Eric's E-61 temp adapter (miKe mcKoffee has the
particulars...I believe he recently installed one on his Bric).
Mike (just plain)

3) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
i have the same machine - when it stops sputtering, i estimate temp to be
around 206F.  i count down from there, typically to 198-200F(6-8secs)
next i either wait 15-20secs and pull, or immediately pull a shot.  both
methods work well, and the taste seems to be more dependent on the
bean/blend im using.  
From: Clifton Burkett [mailto:cliflb] 
Sent: Tuesday, March 27, 2007 11:59 PM
To: Sweet Maria's - Homeroast List
Subject: +finding the right brew temperature
What methods do you use to find the correct brew temperature when you are
pulling shots for a new bean ? Pull a few shots above and below a given
temperature? I have a Giotto so for me the middle temperature spot being
when the steam just stops coming out of the brew group.
Clif - SomeWhere in Florida
with Rocky the Cardi and Garfield the Tabby
Odie PWC at the Bridge 01/18/2006
 http://www.freewebs.com/aesk/inmemoriam.htm

4) From: Greg Scace
I taste the coffee.  Then I move temperature in relatively large 
steps to corroborate my sense of where I want to move things.  Once 
I've confimed my impressions regarding direction, i make pretty large 
changes at first, then smaller ones until I get to where I think it 
should be based on taste.  I use one of my thermometers (Scace Device 
or whatever ya wanna call it) to measure the temperature, and then I 
record it in a notebook.
-Greg
At 10:59 PM 3/27/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Barry Luterman
Usually just one. Very narrow range for espresso. For me either 1 degree C 
either way. Most coffees fall in a 3 degree Celsius range.

6) From: Michael Dhabolt
Up to a point I'll agree with Barry.  The point is that every once (unusual)
in a while I find a blend that I like pulled a little cooler.  The vast
majority of the time I'm pulling between 201F and 203.5F.
Barry Luterman wrote:
<Snip>
Mike (just plain)

7) From: David Morgenlender
How many experimental shots do you typically pull before getting the =
desired
temperature locked in?
Dave
On Thu, 29 Mar 2007 12:42:06 -0500, you wrote:
<Snip>
 group.
<Snip>
sk/inmemoriam.htm
<Snip>
==========================
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Dave Morgenlender
e-mail: dmorgen
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8) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Mike I agree I said most coffees. Every once in a while a blend needs an =
extra click in one direction or another. The point is, it is not that =
difficult to find the brew temp, for a roast.

9) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Also Mike you are reporting in F not C.

10) From: Greg Scace
If I'm totally new to the coffee maybe 3 or 4.  If I've used it 
before then 1 or 2.  Crops change and sometimes you go a little one 
way or the other.
At 05:44 PM 3/29/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>


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