HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Blueberry breakfast (somewhat long post - sorry) (14 msgs / 506 lines)
1) From: Larry Johnson
You're gonna love this (maybe). Here's the thing: I have, like every other
newbie, been fascinated with the accounts of the loverly blueberry
aroma/flavor when you catch the right Ethiopian bean, with just the right
roast, with the perfect grind, brewed to precise specifications, and you hit
the sweet spot and get those blueberries. I figured I had a ways to go in
roasting skill, brewing experience, and some amount of luck before I had the
experience myself.
I had roasted some Harar to FC/FC+ on 3/4/07 (that's right - over 3 weeks
ago), stored in a Mason jar. The greens were over 2 years old at the time of
roast. I had purchased them from SM during my first foray into homeroasting.
(The story of my 2 year hiatus is for another day, if ever). The burlap bag
was tagged with SM's label which simply read "Organic Ethiopian Free Trade
Harar". Roasted in my BM/HG (thanks Vicki) and I had been brewing from it
every day or so until the beans were down to just a few tbsp, and I switched
to the Congo Peaberry (new beans).
Okay; this morning, in a sleep-deprived funk, I decided to finish it off in
my Bialetti Moka pot. I scooped 3 scant tbsp into the Solis, ground 'em up,
and guess what I smell? Blueberry! Clear as day! Hot-diggity! I pour the
grounds in the filter and, much to my dismay, it's not full. Dang. I usually
round it up a little and this one is not even completely full to the rim.
Oh, well; so it goes. Then I noticed that the grind didn't look right. I
looked at the Maestro, and the grind setting was over near the Drip Brew
symbol, maybe 2 notches in the fine direction. Great, just great.
What the heck, I ain't got time for this schtuff, I have to go to work, so I
brewed it up. Made an Americano (as always). First sip - blueberries. All up
in my face blueberries. With some other fruits along for the ride (Mango?
Pineapple?).  Last sip (almost room temp by now) - blueberries, fruits, etc.
Wow.
Did I mention I was finishing off the batch? Can anybody think of something
else I can do wrong to see if it gets even better?
-- 
Larry J
If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please
bring me some coffee.
  - Abraham Lincoln

2) From: Brett Mason
Terrific Larry!
I'm the guy who says to grind coarse for a mokapot, and then fill the
basket 2/3, heat over medium until the sweet nectar arrives in the
top...
So you hit it with a coarse grind?  That's no mistake!
Brett
On 3/29/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

3) From: Larry Johnson
You have a convert.
On 3/29/07, Brett Mason  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please
bring me some coffee.
  - Abraham Lincoln

4) From: Silvia Marsh
Woohoo! Congrats on the fruit! Sounds like a great breakfast. ;)
Silvia
On 3/29/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Leo Zick
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
i had coffee this morning. i drank it on the way to work!
-the end  
From: Larry Johnson [mailto:lilboybrew] 
Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2007 8:11 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Blueberry breakfast (somewhat long post - sorry)
You're gonna love this (maybe). Here's the thing: I have, like every other
newbie, been fascinated with the accounts of the loverly blueberry
aroma/flavor when you catch the right Ethiopian bean, with just the right
roast, with the perfect grind, brewed to precise specifications, and you hit
the sweet spot and get those blueberries. I figured I had a ways to go in
roasting skill, brewing experience, and some amount of luck before I had the
experience myself. 
 
I had roasted some Harar to FC/FC+ on 3/4/07 (that's right - over 3 weeks
ago), stored in a Mason jar. The greens were over 2 years old at the time of
roast. I had purchased them from SM during my first foray into homeroasting.
(The story of my 2 year hiatus is for another day, if ever). The burlap bag
was tagged with SM's label which simply read "Organic Ethiopian Free Trade
Harar". Roasted in my BM/HG (thanks Vicki) and I had been brewing from it
every day or so until the beans were down to just a few tbsp, and I switched
to the Congo Peaberry (new beans). 
 
Okay; this morning, in a sleep-deprived funk, I decided to finish it off in
my Bialetti Moka pot. I scooped 3 scant tbsp into the Solis, ground 'em up,
and guess what I smell? Blueberry! Clear as day! Hot-diggity! I pour the
grounds in the filter and, much to my dismay, it's not full. Dang. I usually
round it up a little and this one is not even completely full to the rim.
Oh, well; so it goes. Then I noticed that the grind didn't look right. I
looked at the Maestro, and the grind setting was over near the Drip Brew
symbol, maybe 2 notches in the fine direction. Great, just great. 
 
What the heck, I ain't got time for this schtuff, I have to go to work, so I
brewed it up. Made an Americano (as always). First sip - blueberries. All up
in my face blueberries. With some other fruits along for the ride (Mango?
Pineapple?).  Last sip (almost room temp by now) - blueberries, fruits, etc.
Wow. 
 
Did I mention I was finishing off the batch? Can anybody think of something
else I can do wrong to see if it gets even better?
-- 
Larry J
If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please
bring me some coffee. 
  - Abraham Lincoln

6) From:
Larry:
Congrats...
I have sais for a long time, let that horse sit around. I discovered just a you did this morning, the blueberry comes out raging after a long roast.
I had Horse 30 yesterday after almost 2 weeks, I have some Horse 19 that I roasted at the same time I will have next week that will be 3 plus weeks old.
Keep us posted.
ginny
thanks for the great story
---- Larry Johnson  wrote: 
<Snip>

7) From:
Leo:
Poor guy. SAend me your address off list to thegster and I will send roast more Horse, wait a least a week, send it to you and you can wait another week to enjoy it!
warmest regards,
ginny
---- Leo Zick  wrote: 
<Snip>

8) From: Leo Zick
Youre more than welcome to send, but whats wrong with my brew?  I can send
you some too..
1/3 guat la perla estate
1/3 col la esperanza
1/3 nic el cipres
Gently roasted with scrupulous oversight to a degree of c+ over a 15 minute
period on the morning of 17 march.  The exact grinding process occurred over
a 25 second period, followed by a calibrated and patented combination of
stockfleths/chicago chop which I call the stockchop. (all rights reserved).
This was into a ridgeless la marzocco double basket, with a volumetric
measurement of approximately 16 grams.  
I precisely brewed over a 26 second period of time, with a yield of 1.75oz,
allowing it to be a slightly short shot of espresso. Then, I added water, of
the temperature being 205F, at an amount of 7oz. These techniques
essentially made the espresso into an americano. 
It had the taste of a fine coffee, and the lingering aftertaste of a fine
coffee.  It had flavors of coffee, with just a hint of coffee undertones.
The smells wafted from my cup into my car, which had scents of coffee,
cinammon, blueberries, blackberries, current, grape jelly, strawberry
preserves, wild okra, tree bark, maple leaves, and coffee.
I hit the sweet spot about a third of the way into my engineered temperature
controlled travel thermos, when I saw someone behind me drinking gas station
coffee.
Or, cliff notes:  I had coffee on the way to work.
Cant wait till I get to eat lunch!  Theres more than one ingredient in
sandwhiches!!!  
-(tired and cranky leo)

9) From:
Leo, how sweet.
Thanks. I will send your coffee next week. I will roast it today.
g
---- Leo Zick  wrote: 
<Snip>

10) From: Leo Zick
Ginny,
Thanks,
Leo

11) From: Mejia, Carlos
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hmm... I'm still quite new to roasting and never had 'blueberry' coffee
before.  I LOVE blueberrys, and I LOVE coffee so I guess I'll probably
like it.  Since this was an old bean, are there any beans currently
available that have that characteristic.  I've got to try this!  ~carlos
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Larry
Johnson
Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2007 5:11 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: +Blueberry breakfast (somewhat long post - sorry)
 
You're gonna love this (maybe). Here's the thing: I have, like every
other newbie, been fascinated with the accounts of the loverly blueberry
aroma/flavor when you catch the right Ethiopian bean, with just the
right roast, with the perfect grind, brewed to precise specifications,
and you hit the sweet spot and get those blueberries. I figured I had a
ways to go in roasting skill, brewing experience, and some amount of
luck before I had the experience myself. 
 
I had roasted some Harar to FC/FC+ on 3/4/07 (that's right - over 3
weeks ago), stored in a Mason jar. The greens were over 2 years old at
the time of roast. I had purchased them from SM during my first foray
into homeroasting. (The story of my 2 year hiatus is for another day, if
ever). The burlap bag was tagged with SM's label which simply read
"Organic Ethiopian Free Trade Harar". Roasted in my BM/HG (thanks Vicki)
and I had been brewing from it every day or so until the beans were down
to just a few tbsp, and I switched to the Congo Peaberry (new beans). 
 
Okay; this morning, in a sleep-deprived funk, I decided to finish it off
in my Bialetti Moka pot. I scooped 3 scant tbsp into the Solis, ground
'em up, and guess what I smell? Blueberry! Clear as day! Hot-diggity! I
pour the grounds in the filter and, much to my dismay, it's not full.
Dang. I usually round it up a little and this one is not even completely
full to the rim. Oh, well; so it goes. Then I noticed that the grind
didn't look right. I looked at the Maestro, and the grind setting was
over near the Drip Brew symbol, maybe 2 notches in the fine direction.
Great, just great. 
 
What the heck, I ain't got time for this schtuff, I have to go to work,
so I brewed it up. Made an Americano (as always). First sip -
blueberries. All up in my face blueberries. With some other fruits along
for the ride (Mango? Pineapple?).  Last sip (almost room temp by now) -
blueberries, fruits, etc. Wow. 
 
Did I mention I was finishing off the batch? Can anybody think of
something else I can do wrong to see if it gets even better?
-- 
Larry J
If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please
bring me some coffee. 
  - Abraham Lincoln

12) From: Larry Johnson
Look in Tom's cupping notes to be sure, but I think it's mostly
dry-processed Ethiopian (and maybe Yemeni?). If there are others, I'm not
sure which ones without combing through the notes myself. I'm sure if you
started a thread, asking the community which beans have they found blueberr=
y
in, they would chime in.
On 3/29/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
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-- 
Larry J
If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please
bring me some coffee.
  - Abraham Lincoln

13) From: Floyd Lozano
The first coffee I ever experienced with blueberry was the bean that got me
hooked on specialty coffee and eventually coffee roasting.  It was last
year's Ethiopian Hamma Yirgacheffe.  Incredible coffee.  Grinding it made
the room smell like you just crushed five pounds of blueberries, and the
flavor was there in the cup too.  I've not yet found another one as good,
but the Idido Misty Valley is right up there.  And surprisingly not sold out
yet (and it won't be until I run out I am sure !)  Google 'hamma coffee' and
you'll see Ken David's review of the old Hamma there.  it's the top coffee
on the list of the ecafe auction results (and unfortunately won by wataru
and someone/thing else, so you won't see it on these shores.  visit Japan!)
-F
ps I wonder how the price at auction corresponds to the actual price the
coffee goes for.  i see one lot there that I am buying green from another
supplier (gasp) that i'm paying 2x the auction price.  i guess you have to
factor in 1) shipping 2) handling 3) the hassle of getting coffee out of
ethiopia these days 4) 'overhead' (i.e. is there a risk cost built in  to
cover those times when they buy coffees and the lot comes in ruined due to
poor handling at port or whatever).  And of course, markup for profit!
pps i further wonder which of these buying groups Sweet Marias goes in with
to get coffee?
On 3/29/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: stereoplegic
Ethiopia FTO Dry-Process Sidamohttp://sweetmarias.com/coffee.africa.ethiopia.html#ftosidamothen scroll down the page for the Idido Misty Valley
carlos.mejia wrote:
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