HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Lots of Chaf (13 msgs / 454 lines)
1) From: Phil Bergman
I've been roasting daily for 3 months now with my IR2.  I've noticed
something and will pose it as a question for the Pro's.  When I get lots of
chaf after roasting a particular green bean, in general, the cupping results
are better.  When there's little or no chaf on a different bean, the taste
is not as good.  I've roasted at least 20 different green beans.  I've found
some give lots of chaf and others essential no chaf.  And, when there's no
chaf, the cupping is inferior.  With these "no-chaffers", I've tried various
roasting curves, but still little chaf.  So, here's the question:
In general, is there a relationship between getting ample chaf and the
subsequent quality of cupping?
Phil

2) From: Rich M
Hey Phil-
I'm not exactly the pro you're looking for, but I don't think the  
amount of chaff has anything to do with the quality of the cup. I  
think the amount of chaff has more to do with the processing of the  
bean (wet, dry, natural, etc.)  Now, it may very well be that you are  
partial to a certain kind of processing and that style simply creates  
more chaff. Take a look at the beans you've been roasting with a lot  
of chaff and see if they have similar processing methods, and that  
may lead you to an answer.
Rich M
On Mar 29, 2007, at 8:45 AM, Phil Bergman wrote:
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3) From: Bob
IMO..
The IR is designed to need chaff to block the flow of air to build heat in 
the chamber. Hence the advice to leave a roast worth of chaff in the 
collector when roasting decaf, which has little to no chaff. Suspect your 
low chaff greens are being under roasted--may look good on the outside, but 
give them a munch and look at the inside--tan I bet.
I have both IR's and modded one by cutting one side of the screen out. 
Snaked my TC probe into bean mass and use an inverted polyethelene scoop 
over the lid to raise and lower temps at will. Cover lid, temp builds. 
Messy, but I roast outside. This eliminates the need for chaff.
Bob
- Original Message ----- 
From: "Phil Bergman" 
To: 
Sent: Thursday, March 29, 2007 6:45 AM
Subject: +RE:Lots of Chaf
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4) From: Larry Johnson
I totally agree with you, Bob. Last night I tried roasting some old mystery
beans (lost the labelling somewhere along the way) in the IR2. I ran one
batch on profile 2, all the way to the end (I usually have to hit the 'cool
cycle' button with 2-3 minutes to go) and the beans barely made it thru 1st
crack. I tried another batch on profile 1, all the way to the end, didn't
even get to 1st. When I opened the chaff collector after each batch, there
was virtually no chaff at all. One batch went to the garbage, the other is
doubtful at best (looks like cinnamon roast to me).
On 3/29/07, Bob  wrote:
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-- 
Larry J
If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please
bring me some coffee.
  - Abraham Lincoln

5) From: Phil Bergman
Rich,
I'd have to go back and check the processing of each.  I've tried roasting
past FC+ on the "low chaffers" but still with no chaf produced and poor
cupping.  But, I think you're right about the processing.  Which processing
method gives the most chaf?  The least?
Thanks,
Phil

6) From: dsobcz716
The IR2 roast progression is very dependant on the amount of chaff.  More chaff tends to reduce air circulation of the beans, which can increase heat.  If you use the same roast profile for both types of beans, odds are you are not hitting the peak flavor profile for one of them.  
 
Dry processed coffees give off more chaff and tend to have some unique flavor characteristics that wet processed beans don't have.
 
What type of settigns are you using for your roasts?  What is your batch size?
 
Dave

7) From: Phil Bergman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Dave,
Thanks for the reply.  I start the roast with  3 minutes at about  280-300.
Then 3 minutes at 340.  Then 3 minutes at about 370-380 (At about 7 to 8
minutes, I usually hit first crack). At this point, I typically let it go up
to about 400 (by IR2 monitor) and listen for second crack.  I let the roast
go about 15 seconds or so into second and watch bean color carefully.
Typicaly roast last about 10 perhaps 11 minutes.  I certainly don't know
enough to determine different profiles for each bean.
Phil

8) From: john nanavati
what an intriguing string. thanks for asking and posting all.
John Nanavati
Plainfield, New Jersey

9) From: Phil Bergman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Dave,
BTW, I typically use the allowed amount for my IR2.  Two scoops of the
provided scooper.
Phil

10) From: Barbara Wilson
I think the fresher the bean the more chaf it has. I've noticed that 
with the coffee that I got right after it was processed had much more 
chaff. Freshness should relate to quality of cup.
Barbara
Phil Bergman wrote:
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11) From: miKe mcKoffee
No, chaff is not a function of greens freshness. Remaining chaff on greens
is a function of how the parchment is processed to greens. Freshly milled
parchment can yield greens with virtually no chaff or loads of chaff.
Generally speaking DP will yield greens with more parchment than WP.
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
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12) From: Barbara Wilson
MiKe,
I've been buying (in addition to SM coffee) coffee from the same 
plantation in Ecuador. Each time I bought  I noticed a big difference in 
the amount of chaf. Same coffee plants, same processor and I was 
wondering why could there be such a huge difference in the amount of chaf.
Someone suggested to me that the freshness of the coffee could be the 
answer. It did make sense considering all other things seemed equal. I 
don't know exactly where the chaf might be going. It could begin to 
breakdown over time. I've also noticed that the chaf on this last batch 
that I bought in early February at first was coming off in large pieces 
that were the size of half of a bean and maintaining its form  and now 
two months later (the same coffee) and the chaf is broken into smaller 
bits. It may be the same quantity of chaf, just broken pieces taking a 
smaller amount of space.
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
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13) From: miKe mcKoffee
That makes sense if storing greens "more standard method" than vac sealed.
The outer chaf skin would dry out and break up more. Since I've vac sealed
my greens for years I haven't really notice a change in a given beans chaf
character even a year or so later.
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
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