HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Ethipia FTO Dry-Process Sidamo (16 msgs / 357 lines)
1) From: Eddie Dove
Is anyone else enjoying this coffee?
The Gene Cafe has yet to yeild a bad roast of this coffee from City+
to ~Vienna; prefer Full City.  Even though it wanes after a few days,
there is good blueberry for a period and it is consistent crowd
pleaser at work.
A couple of weeks ago I wasn't paying attention and stopped a batch at
about a City roast.  No need to waste it; waited and cupped it.  The
taste was reminiscent of the tastes in the Idido Misty Valley; not the
same, reminiscent.  On a hunch, the profile was tweaked just a tad and
the results of the Full City roast were very good.  The blueberry is
still there, the body improved markedly and today (almost two days
rest) there was just a hint of sweet lemon.
This is a very good, versatile coffee.  People ask for this one by
name and the second 20 pound bag was delivered yesterday.
Eddie
-- 
Docendo Discimus
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

2) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
I agree Eddie.  It is one of my all time favorites.  I prefer Full City 
as well, though it does work well over a wide range.  It is my favorite 
coffee to give as a gift.
Michael
On Apr 3, 2007, at 10:16 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
Is anyone else enjoying this coffee?
The Gene Cafe has yet to yeild a bad roast of this coffee from City+
to ~Vienna; prefer Full City.  Even though it wanes after a few days,
there is good blueberry for a period and it is consistent crowd
pleaser at work.
A couple of weeks ago I wasn't paying attention and stopped a batch at
about a City roast.  No need to waste it; waited and cupped it.  The
taste was reminiscent of the tastes in the Idido Misty Valley; not the
same, reminiscent.  On a hunch, the profile was tweaked just a tad and
the results of the Full City roast were very good.  The blueberry is
still there, the body improved markedly and today (almost two days
rest) there was just a hint of sweet lemon.
This is a very good, versatile coffee.  People ask for this one by
name and the second 20 pound bag was delivered yesterday.
Eddie
-- 
Docendo Discimus
My Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

3) From: Cameron Forde
Hi Eddie,
I like the fruity flavours from this Sidamo quite a bit.  I hadn't
experience the sweet lemon (Meyer) in coffee before this one.  I don't
know if you got any of the DP Yirgacheffe (it follows the Green stripe
in the archives) that Tom had in the fall.  I would rate it a couple
notches higher than the DP Sidamo for fruit flavours.  Between those
two and the Misty Valley I haven't missed the lack of a really good
Harar recently.  I've got my fingers crossed for this year's crop, but
I know Tom will find good coffee, even if it isn't Harar.
Cameron
On 4/3/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
ceforde

4) From: Leo Zick
Yes, i like  it more than the yirgacheffe and misty valley! Maybe I just got
lucky with the roast, but its been great.. I took it to c+

5) From: stereoplegic
me too, actually, although i missed the first batch of IMV. try it as an 
Americano. amazing fruit.
leo wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Scott Marquardt
On 4/3/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>
Funny you say that -- last night I roasted it at city, city+/full, and
full (in my bean-temp lexicon, that's 420, 428, and 438).
I usually don't take DP Ethiopians past City, but it IS a versatile
bean and I wanted to explore the upper registers again.
Among other things, the rest time on those further-along roasts
shouldn't be quite as long, to hit the peak. Or so my theory goes.
- Scott

7) From: Diablo
A good Yirg will knock your socks off.  I cupped some not long ago, August I
think-and it still sets off my taste buds, that had incredible lemon with
pepper.  Simply incredible.  
I don't know that I'd rate it higher than the Sidamo really though, they are
both DP.  So, they will both be invariably better than the other in any given
bag, at any given point in time.  I mean, how often to you get that incredible
perfect roast with a DP?  It's just one of those things, without it's random
nature who knows what it'd be like.  Maybe even just, good.  
Leo
--- Cameron Forde  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Scott Marquardt
On 4/4/07, Diablo  wrote:
<Snip>
All the time.   ;-)
That's why they're my favorite coffees!
- Scott

9) From: Cameron Forde
Didn't Tom do an experiment along these lines?  I seem to recall that
he collected similar looking (light?) beans from a variable DP roast.
I think his intent was to see if it was worth culling post-roast.  I
forget most of the details, but I think his conclusion was that the
cup was flatter.  Anyone remember details?
Cameron
On 4/4/07, Diablo  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
ceforde

10) From: Diablo
I do recall that.  He said you could do it but didn't seem worth it.  Don't
recall any cup details other than, pass.
Leo
--- Cameron Forde  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Diablo
Kudos to you man.  Quite a feet.  What have you isolated that enables you to
account for variable ripe and unripe beans?  With respect to the roast, temp
ramping duration and what have you.
Leo
--- Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Scott Marquardt
On 4/5/07, Diablo  wrote:
<Snip>
I haven't had any DPs where prep & grading presented me with
variability that resulted in roasts needing any culling. I do agree
with Tom that culling is generally unnecessary; I once culled enough
uberlight beans from a Harrar to brew a cup, and it was a fascinating
tea-like thing -- a unique twist on coffee to be sure. Definitely
worth trying; I'd recommend it to anyone but, needless to say, you
have to roast a significant quantity to get that.
I don't control for profile with much sophistication; I'll say that I
cut the heat at or before first crack, slowing the approach to that
City roast level that usually does right by Ethiopians. For deeper
roasts (as in Brazillian DPs) I treat 'em like any wet process bean,
really -- not slowing the roast quite so much at first, but not really
zooming up to FC or so.
My present challenge is determining how long these Ethiopian's should
roast, overall. I don't know enough, yet, to be very confident in any
opinions on the subject; I know it does them little good (if you like
the floral/fruity stuff) to go long.
Seriously though, I just haven't had any unusual problems with DPs,
and when called upon to answer why that's true, if I rub my chin it's
because I wasn't aware that anyone was having any particular problems
with 'em!
- S

13) From: Diablo
It isn't so much that there is a problem.  The point is that due to variables,
the intensity of fruits and florals in a DP cup can vary.  If one wanted to say
there was a problem, it'd be that it's pretty hard to get that intense fruit in
every roast.  That's to say, I have roasted back to back batches of Sidamo with
identical profile ramping, and gotten different cups from each batch.  
13-15 minutes, depending on the heat ramp, seems to do well for my current
batch of Sidamo.  Cutting the heat to low at 405^ and coasting to beginning of
second at 435^.  
Case on point, 2 weeks ago that same heat and time ramp produced unbelievable
blueberry.  The same profile last night does not seem to hold the same cup in
store for me:(  Something changed, could even be humidity.  Sheesh, someone
start a list of all the variables to account for in a roast.  Simple is good,
gets the job done and is enough.  Then you get complex with temp/time ramp and
batch size ambient air temp dew point and whether or not we have an early
spring or extended winter via groundhog analysis........then there's the DP
factor.  
Simple=less stress it seems...
Leo
--- Scott Marquardt  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Brian Kamnetz
Also, length of rest post roast can have a big effect, more with some
varieties than with others
Brian....
On 4/5/07, Diablo  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Jeff Oien
I found this from Tom:
'Yes - very uneven roast on this batch - I would only cull the absolute 
lightest beans. Actually, I really enjoy separating and cupping, or even 
just eating these, Good or bad these "underripes" show you what they are 
doing to the cup. Once again, I don't cull out to make totally even 
color. You can seriously flatten out the Harar flavor profile doing that...'
JeffO
Diablo wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Diablo
Thanks dude, man, I should try to recall a little better than I do.  
I don't cull at all.  Perhaps I'll give that a try for the most light beans and
see what happens.
Leo
--- Jeff Oien  wrote:
<Snip>


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