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Topic: Heat Gun advice requested (26 msgs / 761 lines)
1) From: Bob
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It's dead Jim, after six months of hard work it went up in a flash & =
smoke. Seriously, flame on dude. Charburnt anyone?
So, should I replace my $30 Milwaukee low/hi unit with a pricier version =
(the Milwaukee 750 for $70, which is similar in appearances to the =
Master Appliance 751), go with the "digital" readout Wagner for $50+, or =
just stick with the less expensive $30 Milwaukee version?  They all seem =
to be made in China, so likely they have the same parts!
Thanks in advance
Bob
-- 
"Of course the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you--if you don't =
play, you can't win." --Robert Heinlein 

2) From: Rich
Go thee off to fleaBay and obtain the ream McCoy, the Master Appliance Co.  HG-751B.  Accept no 
substitute.  Patience will produce the gun for less than $50.00 delivered.  The 751, and 761A are the 
early model and are basically equivalent to the 751B.  Parts are available for all three.  The 751 has a 
slightly different lower efficiency motor so it draws more current for the same output.  The rest of them 
you mentioned will die soon.  A brand new in the box HG-751B can be had from a reputable distributor 
for $90.00 and then the shipping, probably a total of $100.00 or so.
--Original Message Text---
From: Bob
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 12:40:08 -0600
It's dead Jim, after six months of hard work it went up in a flash & smoke. Seriously, flame on dude. 
Charburnt anyone?
So, should I replace my $30 Milwaukee low/hi unit with a pricier version (the Milwaukee 750 for $70, 
which is similar in appearances to the Master Appliance 751), go with the "digital" readout Wagner for 
$50+, or just stick with the less expensive $30 Milwaukee version?  They all seem to be made in China, 
so likely they have the same parts!
Thanks in advance
Bob
-- 
"Of course the game is rigged. Don't let that stop you--if you don't play, you can't win." --Robert Heinlein 

3) From: john nanavati
i've been using the Milwaukee 8975 for about six months now and am very
happy with it. It might be nice to have one or two more temperature
settings, but I found moving the gun closer or farther away seems to work
quite nicely.http://www.amazon.com/Milwaukee-8975-6-Temperature-Degree-Fahrenheit/dp/B00004TI25/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/002-7424962-6447230?ieF8&s=hi&qid75798940&sr=8-2Because I'm cheap, I first bought the $30 Milwaukee and tried it. I didn't
like it and found this one to be much better.
John Nanavati
Plainfield, New Jersey

4) From: John Moody
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I burned up a Milwaukee 750 in about six months of doing HG/DB.  I attribute
that to my laziness in not regularly keeping the screen chaff free, allowing
internal temps to go too high.  I bought another one, and now make sure it
is completely chaff free at the start of every roast.  It seems to be
holding up well with that attention, and the roasts are more reproducible.
The biggest problem with it is the weight.
John

5) From: Eric Blau
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Hi John,
I bought a Milwaukee 750 about 1 month ago to do HG/DB roasting after my 
air popper died.  I'm very happy with it compared to the Black and 
Decker low powered gun I tried first.  You are right about the weight 
though.  It gets heavy holding it after 10-15 minutes.  It feels very 
solid and well built and I hope to get a lot of use out of it.
What screen are you talking about keeping chaff free?  The screen on the 
end of the gun.  Do you do anything to keep the side vents on the gun 
clean?  I just want to make sure I don't end up burning out my heat gun 
as well since I haven't really cleaned it out before or after roasting.
Thanks,
Eric
John Moody wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 4/5/07, Eric Blau  wrote:
<Snip>
My Master Appliance 751B used to get very heavy too. I solved the problem by
suspending the heatgun with thishttp://www.amazon.com/Texsport-Campfire-Tripod/dp/B0000AUT5T/ref=sr_1_2/002-0869720-6496046?ieF8&s=sporting-goods&qid75802186&sr=8-2Brian">http://www.sciplus.com/singleItem.cfm?terms)83&cartLogFrom=Searchfrom thishttp://www.amazon.com/Texsport-Campfire-Tripod/dp/B0000AUT5T/ref=sr_1_2/002-0869720-6496046?ieF8&s=sporting-goods&qid75802186&sr=8-2Brian

7) From: John Moody
Thatís a great idea.  Even a spring by itself would be a nice way to lighten
the load while still leaving control of the gun.  Do you know what gage wire
is in that cord?  The price seems a little too low for comfort.
John

8) From: John Moody
Yes, the screen on the end of the gun.  I took it and the washer out, but
the temperature variation across the air stream was too great so I put it
all back.  Some people have put a piece of stocking over the adjustable side
vent to limit the chaff from going into it in the first place; I have not
done that.
Iíll tell you how I eliminate the chaff from the screen, but WARN you that
you can easily burn yourself if you slip up.
Before I start the gun is stone cold.  I check the screen for chaff.  If
there is any, this is what I do.  I turn the gun on, and cover both the
motor vents and side vents with the palms of my hands.  The heater element
will glow orange very fast.  Turn the gun off and WAIT for the air to stop
flowing, and then blow a puff of air into the end of the gun.  The chaff
lands on the heater and vaporizes.  If you donít wait for the air to stop
flowing, you will burn yourself.  The stocking method sounds much smarter to
me, and what I recommend you try.  On the other hand, if you stick to decaf,
there is no chaff :-)
John

9) From: Brian Kamnetz
I use the cord only to suspend the heatgun. It is plenty strong for that,
and adjusts about 30 inches up/down, so it is very easy to move the gun
where I want it during different stages of the roast. Whatever height you
move the gun to, it stays there until you move it to some other height. For
example, I tend to have the heat gun very close to the beans to begin with,
then back it off some (raise the gun away from the beans) until first crack,
then raise the gun some more to coast to second crack.
I have some digital photos of me roasting from a while back when Eddie had
some of the same questions. If you like, send me and email off-list and I
will send them to you off-list.
Brian
On 4/5/07, John Moody  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: John Moody
Oh, that sounds like a much safer way to use that cord.
Thatís interesting about the startup.  I start with the side vent open
(lowest temperature) and away from the beans until they are mostly dried and
evened out in color.  I then close the vent and get in closer to push
through first crack, then back off for the coast towards second crack.
John

11) From: Brian Kamnetz
I use a profile (just started using it recently) posted on the list a while
back that suggests getting through initial warmup as fast as possible. Here
it is:
From Jim Shulmans newsgroup messages comes a general profile that I've
tried to follow:
room temp to 265F - initial warm up - as fast as possible (2 minutes) **
265F  to 295F - drying phase - 10 degrees rise per minute. (3 minutes) *[5]*
295F to 385F - browning phase to start of first crack - 30 degrees rise
per minute (3 minutes)   *[8]*
start of first crack to start of second crack (FC) - 10 degrees rise per
minute (5 minutes)         *[13]*
This is a starting point to work from; it will take about 13 minutes to
completion.
I try to follow that, though I go strictly by visual indications, since I
don't have a way of measuring temps.
Brian
On 4/5/07, John Moody  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: John Moody
Yeah, I follow a similar approach but 3 minutes to 250F and drying phase.
I find the 750 gun will get it way past 255F in 3 minutes if I hold it
close; I do use a thermocouple.  I have roasted 400gm batches this way and
it surprised me how fast the initial heat goes in.
Iím going to try working closer to the profile you posted for the next batch
and see how that goes.  Iím not sure I can get 30deg/min to 1st, which may
be an area I can improve.
Control over profile is something that Iím just recently experimenting with;
I had just been going for time to completion priorÖ
John

13) From: Brian Kamnetz
Until very recently I have been going on total time too. It's just in the
last roast or two that I printed out the roast time subgoals and tried to
follow them, but again, I'm just going by visuals, i don't have a way to
measure tempts. That would be very helpful from a learning standpoint.
Brian
On 4/5/07, John Moody  wrote:
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d
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y
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14) From: jim gundlach
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Bob,
     I have been thru about six heat guns.  I've killed three cheap,  
made in China under $35, ones and concluded they just are not worth  
it.  In fact, I have decided to try to avoid as much of the made in  
China junk as I can. I have a Master Appliance 751 that I have had to  
replace the heating element on it once but it is repairable and with  
parts will last forever.  My problem with it is that it really gets  
heavy by the time you do the second or third roast with it.  The one  
I have now that I use all the time is the Milwaukee 8986-20.  It  
feels well built, made in Switzerland,  and it is light enough to use  
for more than half an hour without causing my arm to cramp up.  It is  
the one I use all the time now.  I think I paid about $80 for it on  
eBay.  There is another model that has a digital display that I kind  
of wish I had gotten but I am really quite happy with this one.  If  
it should fail I would pull out the MA 751 and use it while I look  
for another one much like the 8986-20.
     Pecan Jim
On Apr 5, 2007, at 1:40 PM, Bob wrote:
<Snip>
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Bob,†† †I have been =
thru about six heat guns.† I've killed three cheap, made in China =
under $35, ones and concluded they just are not worth it.† In fact, I =
have decided to try to avoid as much of the made in China junk as I can. =
I have a Master Appliance 751 that I have had to replace the heating =
element on it once but it is repairable and with parts will last =
forever.† My problem with it is that it really gets heavy by the time =
you do the second or third roast with it.† The one I have now that I =
use all the time is the Milwaukee 8986-20.† It feels well built, made =
in Switzerland,† and it is light enough to use for more than half an =
hour without causing my arm to cramp up.† It is the one I use all the =
time now.† I think I paid about $80 for it on eBay.† There is =
another model that has a digital display that I kind of wish I had =
gotten but I am really quite happy with this one.† If it should fail I =
would pull out the MA 751 and use it while I look for another one much =
like the 8986-20.†† †Pecan Jim
On Apr 5, =
2007, at 1:40 PM, Bob wrote:
It's dead Jim, = after six months of hard work it went up in a flash & smoke. = Seriously, flame on dude. Charburnt anyone?†So, = should I replace my $30 Milwaukee low/hi unit with a pricier version = (the Milwaukee 750 for $70, which is similar in appearances to the = Master Appliance 751), go with the "digital" readout Wagner for $50+, or = just stick with the less expensive $30 Milwaukee version?† They all = seem to be made in China, so likely they have the same = parts!†Thanks in = advance†Bob†--† "Of course the game is = rigged. Don't let that stop you--if you don't play, you can't win." = --Robert Heinlein
= --Apple-Mail-1--53929659--

15) From: Bob
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Jim et al
Thanks ~ I'm like you, avoiding the China junk when I can. I will look =
for both the MA 751 & the Milwaukee 8986-20.
I have a hair dryer holding stand that I use to hold the gun in place, =
so I can strap it into the cradle before I start roasting. Sort of a =
gooseneck device on a telescoping rod. Hopefully it can handle the =
higher weight of the new gun.
Bob

16) From: raymanowen
Learn from my mistakes.
I was sure I had kept one of the Master heat guns I repaired and upgraded
years ago. I couldn't find any of them, but the Wild Hair had been sewn.
Harbor Fright had a Glorious People's Orange heat gun with switch for $Ten,
and my Celtic Critic's Kitchen Aid mixer bowl was begging to be misused.
Just the s/s bowl, separate from the mixer itself. I detest violence.
Heat guns are normally used to help peel off paint and floor tile. Either
job can take hours of continuous use, so I thought nothing of a 15 - 20
minute coffee roast.
"I'm going to have to install a mesh cover and a nylon hose filter over the
back of this thing so the chaff can be blocked without blocking airflow into
the HG." Oh, well- I should have done it. Eating chaff is not a good diet
for heat guns.
The Wagner heat gun has a two year warranty, and the nylon hose filter
collects a gross wad of chaff. Glorious People's Orange did six roasts
before the blue fire, electric smoke and sparks flew.
You absolutely do not have any use for Digital Temperature Control, or any
other bells and whistles. The temperature control is meaningless unless you
realize it doesn't mean the temperature of anything of specific interest,
All you need is to be able to turn it On, and it gets hotter than Hell. All
the rest is totally controlled by the way you hold the heat gun. That's why
Digital Temperature Control is just a marketing scam. I could build you one
with a tachometer, Geiger counter, sound pressure level meter, and airflow
indicator. And all you wanted to do was roast coffee.
Turn it up full tilt and control the roast with your hand hold of the HG.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

17) From: Floyd Lozano
Would turning it up half tilt increase the lifespan of the gun?  That's my
only concern there.  Full tilt has the advantage of blowing captured chaff
out as mini chaff comets.  Very cool to watch.  Guess I need some stocking
for the back end of this gun.
-F
On 4/5/07, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Rich
The heat gun will also have to be equipped with a jeweled mud flap and a long antenna with a genuine 
coon tail...
--Original Message Text---
From: raymanowen
Date: Thu, 5 Apr 2007 19:57:52 -0600
Learn from my mistakes.
I was sure I had kept one of the Master heat guns I repaired and upgraded years ago. I couldn't find 
any of them, but the Wild Hair had been sewn. Harbor Fright had a Glorious People's Orange heat gun 
with switch for $Ten, and my Celtic Critic's Kitchen Aid mixer bowl was begging to be misused. 
Just the s/s bowl, separate from the mixer itself. I detest violence.
Heat guns are normally used to help peel off paint and floor tile. Either job can take hours of 
continuous use, so I thought nothing of a 15 - 20 minute coffee roast. 
"I'm going to have to install a mesh cover and a nylon hose filter over the back of this thing so the 
chaff can be blocked without blocking airflow into the HG." Oh, well- I should have done it. Eating 
chaff is not a good diet for heat guns. 
The Wagner heat gun has a two year warranty, and the nylon hose filter collects a gross wad of chaff. 
Glorious People's Orange did six roasts before the blue fire, electric smoke and sparks flew.
You absolutely do not have any use for Digital Temperature Control, or any other bells and whistles. 
The temperature control is meaningless unless you realize it doesn't mean the temperature of 
anything of specific interest, 
All you need is to be able to turn it On, and it gets hotter than Hell. All the rest is totally controlled by 
the way you hold the heat gun. That's why Digital Temperature Control is just a marketing scam. I 
could build you one with a tachometer, Geiger counter, sound pressure level meter, and airflow 
indicator. And all you wanted to do was roast coffee. 
Turn it up full tilt and control the roast with your hand hold of the HG.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

19) From: an iconoclast
On 4/5/07, Bob  wrote:
<Snip>
Here is the heatgun I use:http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/product2_6970_200195724_200195724I went with high-end, but many people roast with a $50 heat gun from
Home Depot, Searsor Lowes.
This one has easily cleanable filters when chaff clogs them up.  It
has a slider control that goes up to 1100 degrees and a slider control
3 speed fan. My husband likes it because we can use it to bend plastic
pipe, take off paint, etc.  I hang it off the BBQ hood facing down
into the dog bowl/colander combination that's sitting on top of the
(Front Avenue grill from Costco made by Charbroil) BBQ side burner.
The heat gun is held down by an extra bag of beans on the BBQ hood.
I've used this now for almost 2 years and roast 10-14 lbs of greens
per week. It's great.
Take care,
Ann
-- 
Sweet Maria's list searchable archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/index.htm

20) From: raymanowen
Dummkopf says, "the Wild Hair had been sewn."
Better: "the Wild Hair had been sown."
Things are sewn around here- even quilt designs by Yours Truly. In the next
room, CC has Janome sewing/embroidery machines. Could have gotten a Mondo
espresso machine for the price of just about any one of them.
Machine quilting takes the simplest of machines, so guess what I get to use?
Singer 99K. Wurks.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

21) From: raymanowen
"Would turning it up half tilt increase the lifespan of the gun?"
Yes, but then it would be only half as hot as Hell.  - -ro

22) From: jim gundlach
On Apr 5, 2007, at 9:21 PM, an iconoclast wrote:
<Snip>
This is the same body and temperature range as the Milwaukee 8960-20  
but with the digital temperature display.
Ann, how useful do you find the display?
    Pecan Jim

23) From: Edward Rasmussen
I'm not Ann, but I'll offer my experience with this unit.  I've been
using mine for several months now and I really like it.  I roast in my
backyard in temperatures ranging from 15 to 90 degrees depending on the
time of year.
For me, the value of the digital display is in being able to always set
the gun to a specific output temperature regardless of the ambient
temperature when I start the roast.  I have been setting my gun to 800
degrees and I then vary the speed of the roast like most people do--by
varying the distance between the gun and the beans.  I figure that
setting the gun below the maximum setting that it has been designed for
will prolong its life and always having the same output temp will
eliminate one variable as I'm trying to control the roast speed by
adjusting distance.
The gun is lightweight and easy to grasp by the barrel while pointing
the muzzle down into the bowl.  I can do several batches in a row
without tiring from holding the gun.
Ed
<Snip>

24) From: jim gundlach
Ed,
    That sounds like it may well be worth the extra cost over the  
8986-20 to be able to hold the temperature constant.  I also like  
your thinking about increasing the life of the gun by running at less  
than top heat.  I just paid $1,224.65 to get a dog through a rattle  
snake bite so upgrading the heat gun will be a while.
     Pecan Jim
On Apr 6, 2007, at 12:50 PM, Edward Rasmussen wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: raymanowen
Ed, guess what-
You can set the temperature at 800į, but if the ambient is cool or the li=
ne
voltage is low, the control circuit might have to run the heater wide open
to achieve your set point.
For people that worry about running the electric heater at maximum setting,
remember the toaster and the warranty on your heat gun. Mine has another
year to go, but for $36, it doesn't owe me anything at this point.
Heat guns are normally used for scraping paint or floor tiles, so roasting
coffee is an exercise in doing nothing if you keep the chaff out of it. I'v=
e
seen the tiny filters some of them have on display at Grainger's. Do
yourself a favor and devise some sort of filter to stop the chaff before it
can plug up the HG filters.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN AN IRRESISTIBLE FORCE MEETS AN IMMOVABLE OBJECT?
Indescribable Chaos- One of  W. Miller Owen's dinner funnies
On 4/6/07, Edward Rasmussen  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

26) From: an iconoclast
On 4/6/07, Edward Rasmussen  wrote:
<Snip>
I concur, Ed.  We start roasting with the gun at 850 degrees and lower
it to around 750 after 1st crack is over to coast into 2nd crack. But
it's all variable depending on ambient temp, wind speed, caff or
decaf, etc. I'm generally anal so like seeing the temp. I love the
slide out filters on this thing. So easy to clean.
I have to say "we" as my husband has taken over roasting duties for
the last 2 months because of my painful thumb joints. He does a great
job.  If I feel the need for a Zen experience, he stirs the beans
until they get to 1st crack and then I take over. It's working well as
I bag and label while he's roasting.
Take care,
Ann
-- 
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