HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Bean/rest template (19 msgs / 528 lines)
1) From: Diablo
How about we start a new thread on your experience with rest in
relation to a variety of bean?  Try and cut/paste your addition and maybe we
can get a nice list of your roast level, bean type and best rest for said bean.
Sidamo, C+ to Vienna at 435^, rested 2-3 weeks for intense Blueberry
Sumatra Mandheling, Vienna at 425^, no rest to over night for Rich Earthy notes
Costa Rica Dota Tarrazu, C+ to Vienna at 420^, overnight for Citrus, Floral
Peru Norte, C at 410^, overnight for great Orange, Leather, Cherry, Raspberry
Let's make a big list.  Oh, how about we keep this for brewed, or if you want
to just add a note for brew method that'd work most excellently.
Leo

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
<Snip>
 Let's make a big list.  Oh, how about we keep this for 
<Snip>
Would "brewed" be as opposed to chewing whole beans? :-) Or did you mean a
specific brewing method like drip brewed, or ibrik brewed, or press pot
brewed, or vacuum pot brewed, or moka pot brewed, or pour over brewed, or
cowboy brewed, or Aeropress brewed, or espresso brewed...
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

3) From: Diablo
Touché!  Nice catch dude, thanks.  I'm stuck calling drip as brew.  Other
methods I call by name, French Press and so on.  My bad:)  
Leo
--- miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Ed Needham
I'm sorry, but two to three weeks 'rest'?   I can't help but think something 
is terribly wrong when coffee doesn't taste right in a day or two.  Two to 
three weeks leaves little left to taste in my opinion.
Personally, I prefer most beans right out of the roaster.  The flavors are 
more intense and discreet.  The longer they sit, the more muted and blended 
they get.  Not what I prefer with excellent coffee, and I don't want to 
waste my time with anything less.
Again, just my opinion.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

5) From: Diablo
That's just my experience with Sidamo, you can write in yours of course. 
There's no rules, just experiences and preferences.  
Leo
--- Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
I am still a newbie, but I have to disagree.  Several times I have 
allowed coffee to "rest" (unintentionally) for 3 weeks.  Several of 
those time, the coffee was far superior to what it had been earlier.  
Actually, the fact that it was not so good early on is why it got 
pushed to the back, and forgotten until later rediscovered.
Michael
On Apr 6, 2007, at 1:44 PM, Ed Needham wrote:
I'm sorry, but two to three weeks 'rest'?   I can't help but think 
something is terribly wrong when coffee doesn't taste right in a day or =
two.  Two to three weeks leaves little left to taste in my opinion.
Personally, I prefer most beans right out of the roaster.  The flavors =
are more intense and discreet.  The longer they sit, the more muted and =
blended they get.  Not what I prefer with excellent coffee, and I don't =
want to waste my time with anything less.
Again, just my opinion.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

7) From: Larry Johnson
I've had that happen, as well. One was 3 weeks old and several have been
between 2 - 3 weeks old when they "blossomed".
Possibly Pertinent Point:  I prefer lower acid, more body (not all body, no
acid, mind you) and that flavor profile seems to increase with age. As for
staleness, I may have a low level of sensitivity to the taste of staled
coffee, because I've only had one last long enough to taste that way.
Larry J
On 4/6/07, L. Michael Fraley, MD  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
If this is coffee, please bring me some tea; but if this is tea, please
bring me some coffee.
  - Abraham Lincoln

8) From: Diablo
No rough recollection of bean types?  Part of my aim here is to know which can
take the longer rest, and benefit.  As opposed to finding that they have just
gone stale instead.  This way we can pick, like a Sidamo, and shelf a coffee
for a bit intentionally looking for the flavor to increase.  This would be
quite cool to have a list of beans that do well at certain roast levels and
rest times.  
My problem is probably like many here, they simply do not last long enough
cause you can't wait!  :)  But, if we know which ones to set aside for a bit we
can make that effort:)
Leo
--- Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
I like your idea.  I will start a log for mine, and then contribute 
when I get enough info.
Michael
On Apr 6, 2007, at 5:22 PM, Diablo wrote:
No rough recollection of bean types?  Part of my aim here is to know 
which can
take the longer rest, and benefit.  As opposed to finding that they 
have just
gone stale instead.  This way we can pick, like a Sidamo, and shelf a 
coffee
for a bit intentionally looking for the flavor to increase.  This would 
be
quite cool to have a list of beans that do well at certain roast levels 
and
rest times.
My problem is probably like many here, they simply do not last long 
enough
cause you can't wait!  :)  But, if we know which ones to set aside for 
a bit we
can make that effort:)
Leo
--- Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Ed Needham
It all depends on what one subjectively calls 'superior'.  We can't argue 
with preference, so this is not an "I'm right, you're wrong" kind of post. 
We can all drink coffee the way we like it.
In your example you said, "the fact that it was not so good early on" leads 
me to believe that something went wrong along the way, which could have been 
in the bean, the roast or the preparation, or a particular type of bean with 
a characteristic you don't prefer.  Being new to homeroasting, you might 
have a preference for blends, which are much more rounded and balanced than 
most single varietals.  You might also be used to coffee that is not 
'roaster fresh', and less intense.  Again, it's what we prefer.  No right or 
wrong.
The coffee 'does' objectively change over two to three weeks.  Coffee oils 
and volatile aromatics evaporate.  Chemical reactions inside the bean 
continue to break down the cellular structure and oils saturate the woody 
structure of the bean and seep to the surface, making the bean look darker. 
The remaining oils stale and begin the process of turning rancid.  Flavors 
blend, much like two day old chili or lasagna (which many people prefer).
As I said earlier, if the blended smoothness is what you want, and you don't 
mind missing the highlights (or prefer missing a particular highlight) of a 
bean, then a three week rest might be your cup of tea, er...coffee.
To taste the fine nuances of the varietal, I think it is safe to say that it 
needs to be brewed quickly after roasting, preferably in the first week.  My 
personal tastes prefer the discreet flavors the day of the roast or shortly 
after.  But that's just me.  Most on this list like a few days rest.
I had a Guatemalan Huehuetenango this morning that I didn't have the heart 
to throw away after pregrinding it for a Scout campout this past weekend. 
It stormed Saturday night and it was raining early in the morning when I 
would have been making coffee as fast as a one armed paperhanger.  So I did 
not use as much of it as I had expected and took the preground home. This 
morning, it is very drinkable, but not nearly the flavor that I was getting 
last week after it was roasted.  No rancid smells were noticed, but if I 
kept it another week, I would smell off aromas.
Bottom line is that we do what we have to do to enjoy the best coffee on 
earth.  However we like it.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

11) From: Eddie Dove
Wow!  That is fantastic ...
I like fresh roasted coffee right out of the roaster and every day
until it gone, which is usually about a week, give or take.  If I am
roasting a coffee that I "know" and I know the sweet spot that I am
looking for, I will let is rest and then start enjoying on a specific
day.
In general, I like the Guatemalans beginning on day 3 and love the
peak at day 5.  This past weekend I roasted the Timor and brewed it
right out of the roaster; pure, silky, butterscotch delight.  Then I
let it rest for a few day and really enjoy its subtle Indonesian
heritage.
Eddie
On 4/7/07, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Docendo Discimus
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

12) From: Les
I am enjoying a cup of a quad blend right now.  The last bean was rested
about 5 minutes after it was roasted.  The first bean about 2 hours rest.
This is a smooth, crisp, bodied brew.  Excellent cup of coffee.  It will be
different in 3 days, but I can't say better.  It is a bit thin, but that is
do to the freshness.  Thin isn't bad, it is only different.  I wouldn't try
a shot on this little of beathing time for degassing.  If coffee isn't good
right out of the roaster, it will never be excellent with some rest.  This
quad blend is going to make a great espresso on Tuesday.
Les
On 4/7/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Michael Wisniewski
I love the idea of having a Bean/rest template.  I think I might have
said this in the past...or at least thought about it!  Instead of
having a thread about it though, can we put it up on a web page or
wiki somewhere?  Just something a little easier to find information
on.
Mike
On 4/7/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: Eddie Dove
Hey Mike,
Brett start a thread about that ...http://www.homeroasters.org/php/forum/viewthread.php?forum_id&thread_idB8Eddie
On 4/7/07, Michael Wisniewski  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Docendo Discimus
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

15) From: Brett Mason
Hi Doc,
Would you mind posting your notes about resting coffee on Homeroasters.org?
Here's the thread I started to let people post their favorite rest times for
specific bean(s)...http://www.homeroasters.org/php/forum/viewthread.php?forum_id&thread_idB8Would be a big help to the readers on homeroasters....
Thanks,
Brett
On 4/6/07, L. Michael Fraley, MD  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

16) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
I would be happy to help.  I am such a newbie, that I wasn't sure  
anybody would want any of my info!  :-)  But.. I will post my  
observations, for what they are worth.
Thanks for asking.
Michael
On Apr 7, 2007, at 10:14 PM, Brett Mason wrote:
Hi Doc,
  Would you mind posting your notes about resting coffee on  
Homeroasters.org?
  Here's the thread I started to let people post their favorite rest  
times for specific bean(s)...http://www.homeroasters.org/php/forum/viewthread.php?
forum_id=15&thread_id=428
  Would be a big help to the readers on homeroasters....
  Thanks,
  Brett
On 4/6/07, L. Michael Fraley, MD  wrote:
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of
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or
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opinion.
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flavors
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muted and
<Snip>
don't
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and
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or if
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-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.comL. Michael Fraley, MD=

17) From: Michael Wisniewski
Thanks for the link.  Like others, I am just starting out with home
roasting.  I will post my results to the thread on homeroasters.  It's
not much yet, but I'll start doing that.
Thanks again for the link!
Mike
On 4/7/07, L. Michael Fraley, MD  wrote:
<Snip>

18) From: Brett Mason
Terrific Mike -
We're thrilled to get as many opinions and recommendations on resting into
the forum on Homeroasters.org as this will be retained for public
searching.  I also know this list appreciates the many people who offer
their advice - it's a help to all...
Anybody else who would like to post their recommended rest times for
particular beans are most welcome to do so as well.
  Homeroasters.org -> Forum -> Appreciating Coffee -> Resting Times for
Roasting Beans
Read the first entry, then reply with yours, as many beans as you can
comment upon...
Thanks,
Brett
  RWA
On 4/8/07, Michael Wisniewski  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

19) From: Ken Mary
<Snip>
I would post my rest times, but it would be awfully boring. All of my roasts
peak after two days except some Ethiopians which sometimes need another day
or two.
Last fall I ran about 10 different coffees through a shelf life test. Each
roast was divided into individual 1 mug brews and stored in small bottles.
The bottles were capped after two to four days exposure to air and remained
sealed until brew time. The peak flavor was of course after two days, with a
steady to slowly declining cup profile for about two weeks. After this, the
flavors declined fairly rapidly until definite stale flavors occurred
between the 4 and 5 week rest periods. All roasts were city to city+ in my
drum roaster. Brews were initially daily, then later every 3 to 7 days.
Several more coffees were recently sampled daily for up to 10 days with the
same peak rest time and steady flavors to the last day. In none of my tests
did the flavor improve after the 2 day peak.
It would be interesting if those who experience longer times to peak flavor
could post details of the coffee, roast profile, and storage method to the
Homeroasters.org forum.
--


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