HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT +Pop Corn Popper and roasting beans (16 msgs / 425 lines)
1) From: Leo Zick
microtorr?  is that a unit of measurement below atmospheric?
On 4/12/07, David Liguori  wrote:
<Snip>

2) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Yes.  One atmosphere of pressure, at sea level is 760 torr. (one torr is =
equal to 1 mm of mercury on a mercury barometer)  When working with high =
vacuum devices, the atmospheric pressure often falls well below one =
torr.  Scientific notation is sometimes used ( eg; 1 times 10 to the =
minus 3 torr means .001 torr, one militorr, or 1/760,000 atmosphere.  1 =
times 10 to the minus 6 torr is equal to .000001 torr, one microtorr, or =
1/760,000,000 atmosphere.)  I spent a good portion of my professional =
career servicing electron beam welders which operate in a high vacuum.  =
Where the part is welded, the chamber is closed and in about 3-4 =
seconds, it pumps down to 1 millitorr.  A valve opens to the chamber =
that contains the electron gun at .1 - 1 microtorr and the electron beam =
comes on.  It strikes the metal part at near the speed of light and its =
kinetic energy causes enough heat to melt the metal joint a fuse it.  It =
is considerably more complex than I have explained, but that is the =
general operation.  To actually figure the power at the point of impact, =
we had to employ Einstein's relativistic physics.  The beam had to also =
be focused and deflected to hit the proper spot.  Since the electrons we =
were firing at the part could fit between the metal's molecules, we =
could make the focal point on the backside of the piece of metal and =
weld it to another piece behind it.   I am sure that this is much more =
information than you wanted.  :>)
Mike Chester

3) From: Jim Carter
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
All I got out of that is that it is somehow based on Einstein's Fear of 
Relatives.
-- Jim Carter
Mike Chester wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Amber Systems, Inc.
414 Main Street Suite 211-C
Rochester, Michigan 48307
www.ambersystems.com
p. 248-652-3140 ext. 224
f. 248-652-3402

4) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
ROFLOL! Definitely should have preceded that with a major "spew alert";-)
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Jim Carter
Sent: Thursday, April 12, 2007 3:40 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: OT +Pop Corn Popper and roasting beans
All I got out of that is that it is somehow based on Einstein's Fear of
Relatives.
-- Jim Carter
Mike Chester wrote: 
Yes.  One atmosphere of pressure, at sea level is 760 torr. (one torr is
equal to 1 mm of mercury on a mercury barometer)  When working with high
vacuum devices, the atmospheric pressure often falls well below one torr.
Scientific notation is sometimes used ( eg; 1 times 10 to the minus 3 torr
means .001 torr, one militorr, or 1/760,000 atmosphere.  1 times 10 to the
minus 6 torr is equal to .000001 torr, one microtorr, or 1/760,000,000
atmosphere.)  I spent a good portion of my professional career servicing
electron beam welders which operate in a high vacuum.  Where the part is
welded, the chamber is closed and in about 3-4 seconds, it pumps down to 1
millitorr.  A valve opens to the chamber that contains the electron gun at
.1 - 1 microtorr and the electron beam comes on.  It strikes the metal part
at near the speed of light and its kinetic energy causes enough heat to melt
the metal joint a fuse it.  It is considerably more complex than I have
explained, but that is the general operation.  To actually figure the power
at the point of impact, we had to employ Einstein's relativistic physics.
The beam had to also be focused and deflected to hit the proper spot.  Since
the electrons we were firing at the part could fit between the metal's
molecules, we could make the focal point on the backside of the piece of
metal and weld it to another piece behind it.   I am sure that this is much
more information than you wanted.  :>)
 
Mike Chester
 

5) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Michael get on the job. We made you spew alert officer.

6) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
OOPS!  Sorry!  (And technically... I made myself spew alert officer!)  =
;-)
Dear Sir (Jim),
I must inform you that you are in violation of the rule requiring a
Spew Alert when posting an especially funny post in the forum.  Future
posts from you will be monitored, and further violations could result
in further annoying messages, like this one.
Lt. Michael
Spew Alert Officer
On Apr 12, 2007, at 8:29 PM, Barry Luterman wrote:
Michael get on the job. We made you spew alert officer.
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is 
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chamber 
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light 
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a 
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but 
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wanted.  
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L. Michael Fraley, MD

7) From: Leo Zick
in all my studies i dont remember torr. im assuming its a british/original
imperial unit?
electron beam welders.. sounds like a fun toy :)  very cool info, ill have
to research more..thanks for sharing.
On 4/12/07, Mike Chester  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Jim Carter
My apologies to The List for my oversight. Michael thanks for the gently 
annoying reminder.
-- Jim (a little nutty, but not Pecan)
L. Michael Fraley, MD wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Amber Systems, Inc.
414 Main Street Suite 211-C
Rochester, Michigan 48307
www.ambersystems.com
p. 248-652-3140 ext. 224
f. 248-652-3402

9) From: Michael Dhabolt
Leo,
Leo Zick wrote:
<Snip>
It does seem like extremely low pressure measurement units would have
defaulted to Pascals but for whatever reason, it hasn't.  Drawing pressure
down to low Torr values is also a commonly used method of making sure that
all moisture has been evacuated (pressure / boiling temperature
relationship) prior to inert gas purge in environments such as long term
storage of used nuclear fuel.  Just helping the research ;~}
Mike (just plain

10) From: Coffee Addict
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Jeebus.  I'll assume, due to the type of mailing list this is, that you =
folks drink entirely too much coffee (or maybe not enough) :-p

11) From: Floyd Lozano
You're thinking Tory, the British unit of measurement that equals one
Conservative.
-F
On 4/12/07, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Leo Zick
now THATS old school.
On 4/12/07, Floyd Lozano  wrote:
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13) From: Leo Zick
i thought spent nuclear waste was stored in water?
On 4/12/07, Michael Dhabolt  wrote:
<Snip>

14) From: raymanowen
"i thought spent nuclear waste was stored in water?"
Indeed, and there are those who would then take the water and brew Geiger
Coffee with it! -ro
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

15) From: Michael Dhabolt
Leo,
On 4/12/07, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>
Short term storage is in a 'spent fuel pool' at the facility. Long term
storage is currently done in a dry and inerted atmosphere in a sealed cask
that is then inserted into concrete shields and placed in a location for
possible later shipment to permanent storage sites.  Some facilities have a
lot of extra room in their spent fuel pools, so moving it into long term
storage is not high priority for them.  Note: short and long are pretty much
relative terms.....most of the used fuel has been in a spent fuel pool 15 to
20 years (plus or minus a few)....a fairly substantial percentage of the
short half life stuff has decayed by this time....that's not to say that the
remainder isn't some really nasty stuff.
Now an RK drum correctly manipulated........HHmmm....
Mike (just plain)

16) From: L. Michael Fraley, MD
:-)
On Apr 12, 2007, at 9:39 PM, Jim Carter wrote:
My apologies to The List for my oversight. Michael thanks for the 
gently annoying reminder.
-- Jim (a little nutty, but not Pecan)
L. Michael Fraley, MD wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Amber Systems, Inc.
414 Main Street Suite 211-C
Rochester, Michigan 48307
www.ambersystems.com
p. 248-652-3140 ext. 224
f. 248-652-3402


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