HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Salvaging wet green beans (22 msgs / 642 lines)
1) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Last night, while I slept, something in my plumbed in espresso machine =
gave out and I awoke to find the kitchen flooded.  Now this in itself is =
bad enough, but some of the water had filled the cabinet below the =
machine and this is where I store my green coffee beans.  Several of the =
cloth bags are now water soaked.  I have been busy repacking the bags =
that did not get wet and those with only moist corners, but I am not =
sure if the bags that are soaked can be saved.  I imagine that I could =
roast the wet beans, allowing for a longer dry phase, but over 20 lb. =
are involved and I have no way to roast that amount of beans.  I have =
thought about spreading the beans out on sheet pans and putting them in =
the sunlight to dry, but the high today will only be in the 50s and I =
don't think that would dry them well.  Does anyone have any ideas?  =
Possibly putting them in the convection oven at 135 degrees?  
As to the machine, I have not looked at it yet to determine what went =
wrong.  Turning the master power off did not seem to stop the leak, so =
it sounds like a line came loose on the supply side within the machine.  =
I did check the water line running to it and it is still OK.  The =
machine is a lower priority now.  I want to save as many beans as =
possible and clean the kitchen before I get water damage.  
Mike Chester

2) From: Leo Zick
do you always turn off power to stop water leaks? :o
i think you should just cherish your wet processed beans.. hope they dont
get moldy, spread them out, roast a lot, and share with friends. :)
On 4/19/07, Mike Chester  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Tim TenClay
You might try using one of those food dehydrators...or placing them on
cookie sheets in the sun....
I would think that you caught them soon enough to be salvageable.
Grace and peace,
  `tim
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4) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

5) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Major Double Ouch!
 
That's what I'd try too. Spread greens out in thin layer on water absorbent
material, room temp forced air dry. If trying convection oven I'd keep the
temp below 100f if possible. But this is based solely on intuition not facts
or experience.
 
There's something to be said about protecting greens from environmental
"taints" via vac bag sealing, beyond slowing going baggy probably/possibly
maintaining greens moisture content. Which in this case of course would have
since flooding with water was both an environmental taint and moisture
content attack! Laugh and jeer all you want at my extremist methods, my
greens be protected.
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Dan Bollinger
Sent: Thursday, April 19, 2007 8:06 AM
Egads!  Luckily, coffee beans don't absorb moisture quickly. Spread the
beans out on towels or sheets, even newspapers laid on the floor. Use fans
to move the air over them. 
Dan

6) From: Leo Zick
that stinks. :/
hope the kitchen was ok..
On 4/19/07, Mike Chester  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Mike Chester
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
miKe,
135 is as low as my convection oven will go.  I will try what you and =
Dan recommend and spread them on towels. 
The water in the drawer with the beans was a green/brown color and some =
of the cloth bags that are wet are green from the beans within.  
I am in the process of vacuum sealing all my beans now.  I had intended =
to do this already, but have been procrastinating.  This was a wake up =
call.  
Mike Chester

8) From: Ed Needham
Beans are washed before they are bagged and shipped.  Another wash wouldn't 
hurt them.  Just be sure and dry them as they would be dried at the mill. 
Usually that entails patio drying with raking to keep the beans from molding 
and to hasten the drying process.  Some use mechanical dryers at a low 
temperature, but patio drying is preferable.
Just don't let the beans sit in the wet bag.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

9) From: Dan Bollinger
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Egads!  Luckily, coffee beans don't absorb moisture quickly. Spread the =
beans out on towels or sheets, even newspapers laid on the floor. Use =
fans to move the air over them. 
Dan

10) From: Brett Mason
Spread the moist beans out on newsprint to dry - one layer deep only....
Get the moisture out of there asap - do not let them pickle or ferment,
otherwise you'll need a different list....
Brett
On 4/19/07, Mike Chester  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

11) From: Ed Needham
I'd vote against newsprint paper.  It's full of ink that is mostly water 
based these days, and the paper is the lowest grade, dirtiest paper 
available.  Plus, the news is mostly bad.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

12) From: Brett Mason
I have "blank" newsprint which is amazingly absorbant.  Was used in our move
to Cedar Rapids.  I should have been more clear....
BUT, DRY YOUR BEANS asap....
Also, newsprint is great for cleaning windshields and leaving no lint
behind....
Regards,
Brett
On 4/19/07, Ed Needham  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

13) From: Jim Carter
OTOH, it might optimize the whole coffee drinking, newspaper reading 
process. Albeit, yesterday's news, but optimized nonetheless.
Ed Needham wrote:
<Snip>
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14) From: Angelo
It's interesting that in the article on the 
method of serving coffee in Ethiopian 
restaurants, the first thing the woman does is to wash the beans...
A while back there were a few threads about 
soaking the beans before roasting them because it 
was stated somewhere that the big companies steam 
their Vietnamese robusta to "enhance" the flavor.
A little water won't hurt them if they are not 
allowed to sit in the water.  Although, isn't 
that what's done to the "monsooned" beans...?
A.
<Snip>

15) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
I have head of big commercial roasters whose response to wet coffee 
is to roast it all immediately. you could redry it in a sunny spot, 
and what you might get is monsooned coffee!
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

16) From: Sandy Andina
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On Apr 19, 2007, at 9:57 AM, Mike Chester wrote:
<Snip>
Sounds like you may now have a larger supply of decaf than you'd  
originally bought!
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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On Apr 19, 2007, =
at 9:57 AM, Mike Chester wrote:

The water in the drawer with the beans was a green/brown color = and some of the cloth bags that are wet are green from the beans = within. 

Sounds like you may now have a = larger supply of decaf than you'd originally bought! Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-186--1018278654--

17) From: Mejia, Carlos
What if you were to put them in a pillowcase, secured the opened end and
then run them in your clothes dryer?  I would think the temps would be
warm enough to dry the beans as they tumble around inside but not so hot
as to change them...  just an idea.  ~carlos

18) From: Mike Chester
That is a great idea and probably would have worked, but I already dried 
them other ways.
Mike

19) From: miKe mcKoffee
Great idea Carlos, man that's like DUH!!! Not only do clothes dryers have
low temp settings they usually have air only "fluff" setting!!! 
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

20) From: David Rolenc
hmmm... how about modifying a clothes dryer to be a roaster.... add 
heat, already vents to the outside, it would agitate the beans well 
enough, there's chaff collection to deal with , but it just might work. 
SERIOUS capacity ;-)
-Dave
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: Brian Kamnetz
This sounds like it is headed back toward the "jet engine and cement truck"
method....
Brian
On 4/19/07, David Rolenc  wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Sandy Andina
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I have a feeling that's probably why the JBM greens I'd gotten from  
Country Traders had that white slime when green and smelled like beer  
when I roasted them:  either they were insufficiently dried after  
being washed or flooded, and then vac-sealed with excess moisture  
still in the mylar bag.
On Apr 19, 2007, at 4:59 PM, Mejia, Carlos wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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I have a feeling that's probably =
why the JBM greens I'd gotten from Country Traders had that white slime =
when green and smelled like beer when I roasted them:  either they =
were insufficiently dried after being washed or flooded, and then =
vac-sealed with excess moisture still in the mylar bag.
On =
Apr 19, 2007, at 4:59 PM, Mejia, Carlos wrote:
What if = you were to put them in a pillowcase, secured the opened end = andthen run them in your clothes = dryer?  I would think the = temps would bewarm enough to dry the beans as = they tumble around inside but not so hotas to = change them...  just an = idea.  ~carloshomeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-191--993308522--


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