HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Finding 2nd Crack (15 msgs / 605 lines)
1) From: David Morgenlender
I've been homeroasting since August and I still can't find that second =
crack.  I
usually have no trouble hearing first crack roasting with my GeneCafe.  I=
 have
little trouble finding end of 1st & then City+, using sight (darkening) &=
 smell
(sweet turning pungent).  But I think I've only been certain about 2nd =
one time
... without any idea whether if had just started or not.  I've tried by =
sound,
smell & smoke.  Even using a flashlight it seems like the GC has a slow =
steady
stream of smoke coming out since at least end of 1st for most beans, with=
 no
sudden increase (or any increase really at the roast levels I use, =
occasionally
through Vienna).  Today I think I hit FC+ ... I waited 10 seconds or so =
after
hearing what might have been 2nd crack (not necessarily the beginning of =
it),
but more because I figured it had to have happened by then & the beans =
were
getting darker again!  It was either luck or some mysterious instinct =
that
appeared out of nowhere!  I would really like to feel more confident that=
 I
could hit it every time.
Any suggestions?
Dave
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Dave Morgenlender
e-mail: dmorgen
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2) From: John Moody
How do you cool?
If you abort and dump, you should still hear 2nd popping as you pull the
canister.
If not, you may want to give that method a try; faster cooling, it's a good
thing.  Don't burn yourself......
John

3) From: Eddie Dove
David,
Can you describe to me this roast?  Profile used, times, temperature
settings, ambient temperature, bean roasted, length of roast, etc.  I
have done a LOT of roasting in the Gene Cafe and I would sure like to
help you.  Also, if you would, do a simple test and report the
results.  With the Gene Cafe completely cold and empty, set the temp
at 482F and the time at 15 minutes or more.  Start the roaster and
track (with a timer or stopwatch) the temperature reading on intervals
of no more than a minute and record how long it takes for the roaster
to reach 482F; record this time when you hear the switch kick off the
heat.
Eddie
-- 
Docendo Discimus
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 4/24/07, David Morgenlender  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 4/24/07, David Morgenlender  wrote:
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4) From: David Morgenlender
I use the GC's cooling cycle (which is at least as loud as the roasting =
cycle),
then additional cooling, which depends upon the weather ... if cold & dry
enough, I just walk outside with the beans in a collender (I'm in the =
Boston
area).
I've never (intentionally) stopped the GC without completing the cooling =
cycle.
That's an idea!
Dave
On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 17:54:24 -0400, you wrote:
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good
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I
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&
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one
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with no
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were
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that
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that I
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unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings==========================
==========================
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Dave Morgenlender
e-mail: dmorgen
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5) From: David Morgenlender
Eddie,
I preheated the GC to 420, then a full cooling cycle.
Beans:  158g of Timor FTO Maubesse
Start:				316 degrees
@ 5:00:				440 degrees
@10:30:				469 degrees
(1st crack started 13:40 or slightly earlier;
  it ended at 15:11 or slightly earlier)
@15:11:				420 degrees
@19:26 (end of 1st + 4:15):	431 degrees
I guessed that 2nd crack began at 21:25, but could have been sooner (or =
maybe
didn't start yet!)
Start GC Cooling (& open cover):	21:35
Finished GC Cooling:		30:09
Additional cooling:  collendar & baking pan.
I'll try to run the test ASAP.
Dave
On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 17:14:50 -0500, you wrote:
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Dave Morgenlender
e-mail: dmorgen
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6) From: Eddie Dove
David,
For your next batch of Timor FTO Maubesse, try the following; I got
the best results using this profile with the Timor and I hope it is
useful to you.  I had no difficulty hearing the cracks at all.  If I
was unfamiliar with a coffee, and given that I have a hearing deficit,
I would frequently position my head so that the sticker on the
roaster, just above the chaff collector was right in my face, which
would mean that the exhaust / sound was blowing by my left ear (be
careful not to burn your ear) and I could see the time, temp and the
beans.
Offlist, I will send you my log that I have.  I also found this
profile (or some variation thereof) to be most effective at producing
a loud and at times rolling / boiling 1st crack.
Batch size: 226 grams
Method of Cooling:  External to roaster
1.  Preheat the roaster at 482F for ~10 minutes, get it thoroughly warmed up.
2.  Press and hold the the red button until it beeps.  "E" will appear
in the temp display and "StP" will appear in the time display.  This
is the immediate stop mode; it will finish the revolution and stop.
3.  Quickly, but without burning yourself (watch that black metal
hinge), remove the drum, sit it in the drum stand, load the beans and
reinsert the drum.
4.  Set the temperature to 300F and the time to at least 20 minutes
5.  Hit start and start a timer
6.  Run at 300F for 5 minutes - elapsed time = 5 minutes
7.  Bump heat to 446F for 4 minutes - elapsed time = 9 minutes
8.  Bump heat to 465F for 1.5 minutes - elapsed time = 10 minutes 30 seconds
9.  Bump heat to 482F for about 3 minutes or about a minute into 1st
crack - elapsed time on my log = 13:45 with 1st crack coming in at
about 12:20
10.  Drop heat to 460F for the remainder of the roast.  Second crack
should start at about 17:20
11.  Let the roast go about another 15 - 25 seconds
12.  Initiate the immediate stop mode again, remove the drum and
quickly cool using an external method.  I used a Wearever Cushionaire
pizza pan on the back of a fan.
Compare to your previous roasts ...
I really hope this is helpful!
Eddie
-- 
Docendo Discimus
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 4/24/07, David Morgenlender  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 4/24/07, David Morgenlender  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Kelly Close
I've been roasting for just a couple weeks, with the "Wear-Ever Popcorn
Pumper" air popper of my youth (mom still had it!), and it seems to be
working beautifully - have had some really nice results (and some really bad
mistakes!)...but I don't always find the second crack either.
I've noticed that some varieties of beans (been moving through a sm variety
pack) have more distinct 1st and 2nd cracks, while others seem to have 1st
and 2nd run practically together, end to end, and others have a distinct
"rolling" FC and maybe just a little hint of a crackle for a second, if
that.  I tend to like dark roasts, so I've been trying to find second crack
on every variety as I experiment.  Burnt one batch badly because it never
came. :-)  Is this observation, that distinctness of cracks varies with bean
varieties, consistent with what you more experienced roasters see?
~Kelly
On 4/24/07, David Morgenlender  wrote:
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8) From: Brett Mason
Kelly...
Add a 50' extension cord between the wall and popper.
This will slow down the roast just enough, and your first and second cracks
will become distinct...
Flavors will better develop too...
Brett
On 4/24/07, Kelly Close  wrote:
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-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

9) From: Brian Kamnetz
Kelly,
Be careful when first and second are running together, or nearly so. In my
experience that means the roast is "racing", going too fast, and the outside
of the beans are burning while insides are not getting caramelized. The
result can be sour coffee. If the results taste good you are fine, but if
not, try roasting smaller batches of the varieties that "race".
Brian
On 4/24/07, Kelly Close  wrote:
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10) From: Kelly Close
I have had a couple batches you could describe as sour...they made me think
of copper pennies actually, but that's helpful, thanks.  ~K.
On 4/24/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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11) From: David Morgenlender
Eddie,
Yesterday I tried your profile on the Timor FTO Maubesse.  Very =
interesting!  
I had never heard so many pops during 1st crack ... nothing even close!
When I dumped the beans for cooling there was an impressive amount of =
smoke & a
lot of loud popping from 2nd crack, neither of which I'd previously =
encountered.
(Of course, I had never not used the roaster's cooling cycle before, =
which must
account for at least some of that.)  A side effect ... my house has never
smelled from coffee roasting like this!  It still smelled today!  I =
usually
don't mind the aroma, but this was a little much.  Now I know to put the =
cooling
apparatus near or under the stove hood & run the vent fan!  BTW, for =
cooling I
filled a large baking pan with ice water, then put a smaller pan into it;=
  I
poured the beans into the smaller pan then stirred & dropped beans using =
a large
plastic cooking spoon.
The beans were slightly darker than my previous "FC+" roast of these =
beans.
Cracks occurred at roughly one minute more elapsed time than you had.  I =
started
cooling at 18:35.
The best part ... I brewed a cup of this coffee in a french press after =
the
beans cooled, and it was like none other I've had.  The coffee had a =
wonderful
strong bittersweet roast flavor.  It also had a bittersweet butterscotch =
flavor.
On the negative side, this used up almost all of these green beans!  I =
don't
usually roast this much of a single bean, but wanted to follow your =
profile as
closely as I could.  I'm just going to have to drink more coffee over the=
 next
week or so!  :)  Also, not using the roaster's cooling cycle is a lot =
more work!
(Fortunately, all my burns were extremely minor!)   So I'll play around =
to see
if I can get these great results, while using it.
BTW, your monitoring position is a great improvement over what I'd been =
doing
(placing my head at the side of the roaster with my ear roughly aligned =
to the
axis of drum rotation).  .  It loses the ability to quickly test aroma, =
but it's
worth it because I can hear, see & check time quickly & easily.
One questionable area of my technique is determining beginning & end of =
cracks.
I'm not sure where to consider beginning & end of 1st crack because of
occasional cracks in addition to the overwhelming number of cracks in the
middle.  I'm not confident I caught the true beginning of 2nd crack;  but=
 more
experience with this profile & ear position should help.
Do you have any idea what aspect of this profile vs. my original resulted=
 in the
wonderful roast flavor?  Could it simply be that it was roasted slightly =
darker?
BTW, I then did a 2nd roast ... Ethiopia Natural (DP) Sidamo WP Decaf.  I=
 took a
shortcut.  While manually cooling the beans, I let the GC finish its =
cooling
cycle with the drum in place.  Then I filled the drum & started roasting =
at the
end of the cooling cycle, i.e. not after heating to 482 degrees without =
any
cooling.  To offset the cooler beginning I took the 300 degree period to =
6
minutes, instead of 5.  Then I kept period lengths the same.  I wanted an=
 FC
roast, so I started cooling at first sign of 2nd crack (at 18:20).  I =
haven't
tried these beans yet.
One other thing I noticed ... when raising the temperature, the reported
temperature usually hadn't yet reached the previously set temperature.
Thanks for your help!  (Everybody else also!)
Dave
On Tue, 24 Apr 2007 19:47:32 -0500, you wrote:
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warmed up.
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seconds
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Dave Morgenlender
e-mail: dmorgen
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12) From: Eddie Dove
David,
I am so glad you reported back and in such great detail!  Thank you.
Going by those details, you could probably try a smaller batch, closer
to your norm.  It would be interesting to see if with the smaller
batch, it actually does reach the specified temperature before the
next adjustment.  You may already know this, but if you are going to
use the Gene Cafe cooling cycle, you need to initiate the cooling a
little before the desired roast level, because the roast will drift a
little further along before the cooling cycle halts the roast.
Yes, that roast flavor was from going just a bit further into 2nd
crack and your Sidamo should probably turn out exactly the way you
intended; the Sidamo may have a little more body as well.  I pretty
much recorded the times it took for all of the crack so that I could
know how long it was taking and adjust the profile if needed.
I am really glad this worked out well and it sounds like you ended of
with a great reference for adaptation to the behavior of your Gene
Cafe and your personal taste!  Please keep us updated!
Eddie
-- 
Docendo Discimus
Home Coffee Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 4/30/07, David Morgenlender  wrote:">http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/On 4/30/07, David Morgenlender  wrote:
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13) From: David Morgenlender
Eddie,
The decaf Sidamo came out great!  First cup I brewed in a Chemex & drank =
hot.
The second cup I brewed in a MokaPot & poured over ice ... an amazing =
iced
coffee.  The extra strength of a MokaPot brew turned out to be perfect =
for this
when diluted by the melting ice, and the flavor seemed to be intensified =
when
served this way.  
BTW, I then made an iced Harar Green Stripe this way.  When brewed in my =
Chemex
& served hot this roast of Green Stripe was a big disappointment ... some=
 nice
blueberry, but an unpleasant bitterness overwhelmed it for some reason.  =
But
brewed in a MokaPot & served iced, the bitterness disappeared & the =
blueberry
was overwhelmingly nice!
I hope to roast 3 or 4 kinds of beans this weekend using your roast =
suggestions,
adapted as appropriate (at least I hope it will be appropriate :) ).  =
Thanks for
your help.  I'll post any interesting results.
Dave
On Mon, 30 Apr 2007 20:39:45 -0500, you wrote:
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Dave Morgenlender
e-mail: dmorgen
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14) From: Eddie Dove
David,
That's great!  I have some of that decaf Sidamo ...
I'm glad you posted ... I never thought of using the Moka Pot for iced
coffee.  Living in the south ... I guess I'm going to have get better
at the Moka Pot.  ;-)
Eddie
On 5/11/07, David Morgenlender  wrote:
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15) From: David Morgenlender
Eddie,
It's amazing what one can come up with when too lazy to try pulling a =
shot of
espresso for iced coffee (which I still haven't tried)!  :)
I brewed using my (now) usual settings, based upon suggestions here (from=
 Brett
I think) ... relatively coarse grind (+28 on Rocky), grinds flat in =
grounds
holder (or whatever it's called) (not packed), 4 minutes.  Take a good =
size
glass beer mug, fill with ice, put in a metal spoon (supposedly this =
lessens the
chance of cracking the glass, although I've done without the spoon & no
problems), pour in the hot coffee, trying to make sure it hits ice, stir,=
 add a
little more ice, a little milk ... terrific!  My Bialetti 4 Tasse Moka =
Pot makes
exactly the right amount of coffee for this beer mug (worked the first =
time, no
experimentation necessary!).  Nothing like a heat wave in Boston to get =
this
northerner to brew up some iced coffee!  Come to think of it, this is =
probably
the first hot weather since I've gotten serious about coffee!
Dave
On Fri, 11 May 2007 19:06:02 -0500, you wrote:
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drank hot.
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iced
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 for this
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intensified when
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my Chemex
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some nice
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reason.  But
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blueberry
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suggestions,
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Thanks for
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unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings==========================
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Dave Morgenlender
e-mail: dmorgen
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