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Topic: Cafe Cubano? (21 msgs / 1094 lines)
1) From: Pete
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Does anybody know what kind of bean and roast is used to make Cafe =
Cubano?  My in-laws are avid drinkers of it, and I was curious how I =
would go about making it from them, from scratch.
Typically, Cafe Cubano is made in the states using Pilon Expresso =
beans/grinds.  It taste very much like an italian expresso, yet seems a =
bit smoother.  In addition, its made in a typical old fashion expresso =
maker, although My wife's abuela still makes it by running boiled water =
through the grinds, through a cotton cloth.
Any ideas?
Pete

2) From: Leo Zick
i think its a different recipe than what youd find using home roasted beans,
first, pilon is designed to put hair on chest and provide heart attacks, and
expresso, is prolly how fast it takes for allthis to happen. :D
in italy, old fashioned espresso makers are moka pots, or neopolitan pots.
same in your grandmothers culture?
anyway i dont have a recipe, i have a great one for mexican coffee though!
On 4/26/07, Pete  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Jim Carter
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Pete,
Cafe Cubano is prepared with espresso and a lot of sugar. But, I do not 
mean to suggest that it is simply adding a lot of sugar to espresso. Of 
course, there is a Proper Process which yields quite different results. 
The Proper Process is not difficult.  Indeed, many street vendors in 
Miami and Key West offer Cafe Cubano, or Cuban Coffee, prepared to order 
from a cart.
Most people probably use pre-ground Cuban-style espresso coffee like 
Bustello, etc. As a homeroaster, Jamaican beans might be a good choice 
if you have them. Some might suggest using a Columbian. I would 
experiment with any bean that you like to take a little darker in the 
roast.
Don't worry if you don't have an espresso machine. A moka pot or an 
Aeropress can produce nice results. I'd venture a guess that most 
Cubans, in Cuba or Miami, don't have expensive espresso machines. The 
street vendors certainly aren't using them. What you are aiming for is a 
very concentrated small blast of strong coffee. You can get this from an 
espresso machine, mocha pot, Aeropress, FP, or old sock with beans 
roasted dark.
Do a Google search on "Cafe Cubano" or "Cuban Coffee".  You see a few 
descriptions of the Proper Process. Read a few of them and experiment.
Good luck,
Jim Carter
Pete wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Amber Systems, Inc.
414 Main Street Suite 211-C
Rochester, Michigan 48307
www.ambersystems.com
p. 248-652-3140 ext. 224
f. 248-652-3402

4) From: Sandy Andina
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I've seen it made here by using preground: either Cafe Bustelo or  
Cafe Regil, in a moka pot or more often a Neapolitan flip-drip. And  
made correctly, it's almost as sweet and thick as Greek coffee.
On Apr 26, 2007, at 8:23 AM, Pete wrote:
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Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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I've seen it made here by using =
preground: either Cafe Bustelo or Cafe Regil, in a moka pot or more =
often a Neapolitan flip-drip. And made correctly, it's almost as sweet =
and thick as Greek coffee.
On Apr 26, 2007, at 8:23 AM, =
Pete wrote:
Does anybody know what = kind of bean and roast is used to make Cafe Cubano?  My in-laws are = avid drinkers of it, and I was curious how I would go about making it = from them, from scratch.   = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-55--423776281--

5) From: Pete
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Thanks for the info Jim.
I actually have the process and taste perfected, as good in fact as if =
it were purchased in a Miami in the little paper cups.  My wife is half =
Cuban, Father was kicked out by Castro in '61 because he was educated in =
the U.S. (well not personally but by policy).  He and his mother have =
taught me how to make cuban coffee using Pilon pre-ground beans in an =
old fasioned 6 cup expresso machine on the stove top.  Basically, cook =
the coffee much like expresso, then put sugar in a frothing tin (or any =
cup), add a bit of the coffee, stir until the sugar/coffee becomes a =
paste, then add to the rest of the coffee.  They also use a "Spuma =
Maker".  I'm not sure what the actual intent of this device is, but it =
is basically a mixer with a small wheel at the end that agitates the =
coffee so that it has "Spuma" on top, which is not to be confused with =
froth.  Don't ask me, I don't make the rules, I just follow them.
At any rate, I would like to try it with how roasted beans, and was =
wondering what type of beans to use.  I'll give the jaimacan and =
columbians a try and see how it comes out.
Thanks again for the info.
Pete

6) From: Pete
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Oh yeah, Abuela made it for me once in an old sock.  I had to wonder.  =
Before I left Miami to come back home, went out an purchased a bunch of =
cotton clothers for her, and made her promise never to make it for me in =
a sock again.  Of course, my father in law gave me the spanish to speak =
to her, so I very well may have been telling her to throw out the cotton =
cloths I purchased, and to take her socks she is currently wearing off =
and use those.
Who knows, he can be evil like that.
Pete
P.S.  Almost OT, but I didn't think quite yet.

7) From: Jim Carter
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Here's another idea. Some people may cringe at the thought of adding A 
Lot of Sugar to homeroasted coffee in the spirit of making Cafe Cubano. 
But, what to do with those roasts that "got away from you"?  So, you're 
having a Charbucks moment staring at a batch of beans that saw a lot 
more of Second Crack than you planned. Do you 1) dump 'em in the garbage 
and start over, 2) rest/grind/brew and drink anyway cursing yourself the 
whole time, or 3) give/serve them to your Fourbucks Espresso 
Roast-loving friends and relatives?
Consider these beans as a candidate for Cafe Cubano. To be clear, I'm 
not suggesting that you intentionally over-roast beans on your way to 
Cafe Cubano. Rather, I'm suggesting that if you accidentally over-roast 
a batch, turning those beans into Cafe Cubano might be an alternative 
worthy of consideration. Just rest 'em, grind 'em fine, and brew them 
according to the Cafe Cubano process. The sugar might help. If that 
doesn't work, add steamed milk and make what the Cubans call "Cafe con 
leche".
Jim
Jim Carter wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Amber Systems, Inc.
414 Main Street Suite 211-C
Rochester, Michigan 48307
www.ambersystems.com
p. 248-652-3140 ext. 224
f. 248-652-3402

8) From: Vicki Smith
In Canada, we can get Cuban beans (roasted and green). I have tried 
Cuban Turquino in the past. Not my favourite, but after years of living 
in the US, Cuban products are a novelty.
vicki
Pete wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Brett Mason
Postscript.... Abuela now runs around the house, only wearing socks, and
talking of how Pete learned her language, and liberated her dress code...
Brett
On 4/26/07, Pete  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

10) From: Pete
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Yikes, cafe con leche..... or more appropriately, leche con coffee.  As =
anyone can attest, cafee con leche is alot of cream, allot of evaporated =
milk, and a little bit of coffee.  Yikes!

11) From: Pete
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Brett, you neglected to mention, she runs around wearing only COFFEE =
stained socks.....

12) From: Brett Mason
Sorry Pete,
I barely even noticed the socks....
Brett
On 4/26/07, Pete  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

13) From: Sean Cary
I used to live/work in Boca Raton, Fl, and some of the vendors would try to
sway my procurements to their shops with Cuban coffee and pastries every
Friday.  One day  I left the coffee in a styro cup, on my desk...  Came in
the next Monday and it had leaked through the styro - maybe it was the extra
"sockiness"??!!  
 
One our engineers told me it was the styro...not so sure now!  
 
Nothing like 3-4 shots of Cuban coffee to get you moving on a Friday!
 
Sean M. Cary
Major USMC
Tempus Fugit Memento Mori  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Pete
Sent: Thursday, April 26, 2007 11:10 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Cafe Cubano?
Oh yeah, Abuela made it for me once in an old sock.  I had to wonder.
Before I left Miami to come back home, went out an purchased a bunch of
cotton clothers for her, and made her promise never to make it for me in a
sock again.  Of course, my father in law gave me the spanish to speak to
her, so I very well may have been telling her to throw out the cotton cloths
I purchased, and to take her socks she is currently wearing off and use
those.
 
Who knows, he can be evil like that.
 
Pete
 
P.S.  Almost OT, but I didn't think quite yet.

14) From: Sandy Andina
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Certain acidic substances *will* react with and eat through  
Styrofoam, especially the biodegradable imitation version.  Happened  
to me once with hot cherry cider and again with strong hot tea, which  
leaked out the pores and eventually caused the bottom of the cup to  
separate.
On Apr 26, 2007, at 11:14 AM, Sean Cary wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Certain acidic substances *will* =
react with and eat through Styrofoam, especially the biodegradable =
imitation version.  Happened to me once with hot cherry cider and =
again with strong hot tea, which leaked out the pores and eventually =
caused the bottom of the cup to separate.
On Apr 26, 2007, =
at 11:14 AM, Sean Cary wrote:
I used to live/work in Boca Raton, Fl, and = some of the vendors would try to sway my procurements to their = shops with Cuban coffee and pastries every Friday.  One day  I = left the coffee in a styro cup, on my desk...  Came in the next Monday= and it had leaked through the styro - maybe it was the extra = "sockiness"??!!  Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-56--417299708--

15) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Dump them life is too short for anything but the best if you can obtain =
it

16) From: raymanowen
"...now runs around the house, only wearing socks,"
Say WHAT?
Naw -
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
People should think things out fresh and not just accept conventional terms
and the conventional way of doing things. - -R. Buckminster Fuller

17) From:
we are chasing who?
did they take off their socks!!??"
g
---- raymanowen wrote: 
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18) From: john nanavati
I'm traveled to Tampa on business and found a Cuban restaurant near the
office.
Of course, I had to order a coffee - I'm not sure that this was "regulation"
Cuban coffee but it was interesting - and sweet.
Over the week, I befriended the waitress and she showed me how she made it.
She had a block or brick of pre-ground coffee that she scooped from (I
didn't write down the name because I was having trouble getting over the
"brick of coffee" concept ;- ), but it was white with blue letters). Anyhoo,
she used an espresso machine to brew.
She brewed a little bit into an espresso pitcher and stopped the process.
Then she poured three heaping spoon-fulls of sugar into the pitcher and
stirred (and stirred) until it was a very thick paste. She showed me that it
was ready when she picked up the spoon and watched the mixture barely ooze
off of the spoon. (if it fell like a glob, it wasn't ready and needed more
stirring.)
Once this was done, she placed the pitcher under the spout again and
restarted the brewing process (same portafilter). She let it go for 20-30
seconds, stopped it, gave it a quick stir, and poured it into a cup for me.
Strong and sweet - whoo weee!!!
Don't know if I could have that every day.
John Nanavati, DHI, CIT
Plainfield, New Jersey

19) From: Tom Ulmer
That preparation style is typical and there's certainly nothing "foofy"
about being served at the walk-up window in a disposable shot cup.

20) From: Sandy Andina
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Cafe Regil?
On May 4, 2007, at 4:23 PM, john nanavati wrote:
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Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Cafe Regil?
On May =
4, 2007, at 4:23 PM, john nanavati wrote:
She had a block or = brick of pre-ground coffee that she scooped from (I didn't write = down the name because I was having trouble getting over the "brick of = coffee" concept ;- ), but it was white with blue = letters). Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-60-314397047--

21) From: john nanavati
Sorry. I don't remember it well. I looked up Cafe Regil on the web and its
packaging didn't look familiar. Of course, I looked at other cuban coffees
and didn't see any other that looked familiar - I guess that I'd make a poor
witness for the police ;- )
FWIW, I'll be going back in august and will check it out again then.
On 5/4/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
--
John Nanavati, DHI, CIT
Plainfield, New Jersey


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