HomeRoast Digest


Topic: oily beans (13 msgs / 647 lines)
1) From: MSMB
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Two days in a row now I tried roasting up about one coup of Guatamalan =
decaf
in my I-Roast using the pre-set 2 setting. Last night I figure there =
must be
something going on with the power supply in my neighborhood because =
after a
about 6 minutes the beans were very dark.  I just gave them to a friend =
who
I know likes dark roasts.   So today I tried again and after 5 Ĺ =
minutes
they were again glossy and oily looking.  Today, though I ground some up =
and
they donít look that dark (maybe a little bit, but not nearly as dark =
as I
thought when looking at the outside of the roasted bean.  Does anyone =
know
what is going on?  I know that the bean color is not always a good =
indicator
of the roast, but if the bean is oily wouldnít the oiliness of the =
bean
suggest a very deep roast?
 
MSMB  

2) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Sound like way too hot a setting. Stop using the pre set and program a =
roast instead using a gentler slower slope.

3) From: raymanowen
Is that volume of beans not an overload for the i-Roast? -ro
On 4/27/07, Barry Luterman  wrote:
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-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

4) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Note OP said used one "coup" (meaning cup I'm sure) beans and 5&1/2 =
minute
roast time to dark and oily. Highly suspect too much for I-Roast =
resulting
in virtually no bean movement if any and corresponding roasting much =
hotter
consequently very dark on the outside and much lighter on the inside of =
the
bean. Suggest reduce batch size so beans barely move, but do move, at =
start
of roast.
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I =
must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal =
enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone =
before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Barry =
Luterman
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2007 1:22 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +oily beans
Sound like way too hot a setting. Stop using the pre set and program a =
roast
instead using a gentler slower slope.

5) From: Ross
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Yes, one cup of beans is overload for the I-Roast.  The I-Roast comes =
with a 1/2 cup scoop and the instructions say you can use up to two =
scoops, but I can confirm that 1 cup is too much for the I-Roast.  =
Better to go with somewhere between 1/2 cup and 3/4 cup.  Additionally, =
I can confirm that the presets are very hot programs, so do as Barry =
suggested, try a program similar to 360/5+00, 400/2+00, 380x3+00, =
415x2+00 if your voltage is good (steady 110v) it will hit 1st crack at =
about 7 minutes elapsed (5 on the countdown timer)  and you will need to =
hit the cool button at about 10+30 elapsed (1+30 on the countdown).  If =
you still have fast/hot/sour roasts you will need to get a variac and =
control your voltage.  If you control the voltage at 110v  and roast =
small quantities the I-Roast is a very nice roaster.
Regards,
Ross

6) From: Rich M
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Hi-
I agree with the others-- too many beans for the IR. You can get away  =
with up to a cup with some beans, but I've taken to roasting between  
2/3 and 3/4 cup at any one time. Also, if memory serves, the preset 2  =
is the program that goes hot right away without any warmup. In my  
opinion, this is not a good thing because it tends to really darken  
the bean without any appreciable warm-up. You should try the preset 1  =
or, better yet, custom program with the first 3 minutes at 340 F or  
so. Then, listen to those beans talk to ya. Good luck.
Rich M
On Apr 27, 2007, at 3:08 PM, MSMB wrote:
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--Apple-Mail-3--307902547
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Hi-I agree with the =
others-- too many beans for the IR. You can get away with up to a cup =
with some beans, but I've taken to roasting between 2/3 and 3/4 cup at =
any one time. Also, if memory serves, the preset 2 is the program that =
goes hot right away without any warmup. In my opinion, this is not a =
good thing because it tends to really darken the bean without any =
appreciable warm-up. You should try the preset 1 or, better yet, custom =
program with the first 3 minutes at 340 F or so. Then, listen to those =
beans talk to ya. Good luck.
Rich = M On Apr 27, 2007, at 3:08 PM, MSMB = wrote:

Two days in a row now = I tried roasting up about one coup of Guatamalan decaf in my I-Roast = using the pre-set 2 setting. Last night I figure there must be something = going on with the power supply in my neighborhood because after a about = 6 minutes the beans were very dark.† I just gave them to a friend who = I know likes dark roasts.† †So today I tried again and after 5 Ĺ = minutes they were again glossy and oily looking.† Today, though I = ground some up and they donít look that dark (maybe a little bit, but = not nearly as dark as I thought when looking at the outside of the = roasted bean.† Does anyone know what is going on?† I know that the = bean color is not always a good indicator of the roast, but if the bean = is oily wouldnít the oiliness of the bean suggest a very deep = roast?

MSMB † = --Apple-Mail-3--307902547--


7) From: DJ Garcia
I have found it extremely hard to get a decaf roast with no oil at all.
Still trying, because I don't do many. I think the next one will have no
oil, but it may also end up under-roasted ...
DJ

8) From: Mejia, Carlos
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
 
I would agree, with Ross's advice.  I've had my iR2 for about 5 months
now and found that the maximum size batch for this machine is about 150
grams which is less than 6 oz.  I have a profile that I found on the
internet after researching a lot and it seems to work pretty well for
many different beans.  The profile is 320 for 4min, 420 for 3min and 390
for 8 min.  I usually stop the roast after a total time of about 8-10
minutes. This is still faster than I would like, but I haven't found a
profile yet that will extend the time further before reaching Full City
roast. (if anyone has one...please share it)  From what I've been able
to learn about the iR2, it seems to roast faster than the ideal roast.
I have no idea why Hearthware programmed the preset #2 because it seems
WAY too hot!   I would program the profile that Ross gave you and this
one, and play around with them. Hope that's helpful advice.  ~carlos
 

9) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
I remember reading somewhere that the #2 profile was designed around
roasting a small batch. Since the air flow is greater and less mass to
absorb heat, they went with a higher initial temp. to allow the smaller mas=
s
to heat in approx. the same time as a larger batch. Anyone else read same?
As for a profile to extend time to 1st crack, I roasted a batch Sunday of
Sumatra Blue Lintong (160 grams) using a initial temp of 350 F @ 5:30 and a
finishing temp of 430 F @ 3:00. I haven't sampled the batch yet but the
finished bean looks great. First crack began around 6:20 into roast and
second was just beginning at the end of the cycle.
I set the temp. and time as a two stage profile because I am finding that
whatever 3 stage profile I use, the second stage always starts the roast
into second crack before third stage starts, even with the onboard temp.
readout showing only 408 to 420 F.
I inserted a temp probe from a GREENLEE multi-meter some time back, and my
unit runs about 20 to 30 F hotter than the onboard readout. (depending on
ambient, type bean and batch size)
On 5/1/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
<Snip>
w
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nt
<Snip>
ll
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it
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e
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the
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-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...
(I'm the tall guy in the middle)

10) From: Mejia, Carlos
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Thanks for the profile Terry.  I'll have to give it a try.  What was =
your ending temp, reading from your T/C probe?   I also installed a =
thermocouple and finding that my roasts are usually ending with the T/C =
reading around 450 to 470 for a FC to FC+ roast level.  Did you have any =
problems with the larger size of your batch?  I've done a lot of 100 =
gram roasts w/o any problem but it seems that, in about Ĺ of the =
roasts where I increase batch size to 150 grams, I get an irregular =
pulse of the fan late in the roast cycle and the temperature spikes very =
quickly... in other words I start to lose control of things.  I'm not =
sure I understand what you mean about second stage pushing the roast =
into second crack.  Isn't it totally dependent on the temperature?   One =
thing that frustrates me is the usual lack of ability to hear 2nd crack, =
or to differentiate between end of 1st and beginning of 2nd.  The iR2 is =
just too loud for me to hear it clearly.   Do you have any profile =
experiments you can share, perhaps offline?   ~carlos
From: homeroast-admin =
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of TERRY =
TITSWORTH
Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2007 5:04 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +oily beans
 
I remember reading somewhere that the #2 profile was designed around =
roasting a small batch. Since the air flow is greater and less mass to =
absorb heat, they went with a higher initial temp. to allow the smaller =
mass to heat in approx. the same time as a larger batch. Anyone else =
read same? 
As for a profile to extend time to 1st crack, I roasted a batch Sunday =
of Sumatra Blue Lintong (160 grams) using a initial temp of 350 F @ 5:30 =
and a finishing temp of 430 F @ 3:00. I haven't sampled the batch yet =
but the finished bean looks great. First crack began around 6:20 into =
roast and second was just beginning at the end of the cycle. 
I set the temp. and time as a two stage profile because I am finding =
that whatever 3 stage profile I use, the second stage always starts the =
roast into second crack before third stage starts, even with the onboard =
temp. readout showing only 408 to 420 F. 
I inserted a temp probe from a GREENLEE multi-meter some time back, and =
my unit runs about 20 to 30 F hotter than the onboard readout. =
(depending on ambient, type bean and batch size)
) 

11) From: MSMB
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Thanks for the information.  I was going to try this profile tonight.  =
In my
original message I was talking about decaf, but is this profile OK  for
regular also?  The decaf was the one that particularly gave me trouble, =
but
I would like to try something new for the regular also.
 
Now for the real embarrassing question.  I have used the presets for so =
long
I canít temember how to program the i-roast (I am using a verion 1).  =
I can
see how to change the initial time, but I donít remember how to =
program the
temperature and to program each successive change in temperature and =
time.
I looked at the I-roast web site where I thought I saw it at one time =
but I
donít find it now.  Would appreciate any help; thanks!  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Ross
Sent: Friday, April 27, 2007 6:57 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +oily beans
 
Yes, one cup of beans is overload for the I-Roast.  The I-Roast comes =
with a
1/2 cup scoop and the instructions say you can use up to two scoops, but =
I
can confirm that 1 cup is too much for the I-Roast.  Better to go with
somewhere between 1/2 cup and 3/4 cup.  Additionally, I can confirm that =
the
presets are very hot programs, so do as Barry suggested, try a program
similar to 360/5+00, 400/2+00, 380x3+00, 415x2+00 if your voltage is =
good
(steady 110v) it will hit 1st crack at about 7 minutes elapsed (5 on the
countdown timer)  and you will need to hit the cool button at about =
10+30
elapsed (1+30 on the countdown).  If you still have fast/hot/sour roasts =
you
will need to get a variac and control your voltage.  If you control the
voltage at 110v  and roast small quantities the I-Roast is a very nice
roaster.
Regards,
Ross

12) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
In this particular roast I did not have the probe installed so I can't give
you an accurate ending temp. however my onboard reading was only showing 42=
4
f.
I don't usually have problems with batch size until I go to 170 or over wit=
h
the exception of beans that produce a lot of chaff. As a matter of fact, if
I am roasting decaf and failed to retain the chaff from a previous roast I
usually go with a heavier load of beans, as this seems to help retain heat
in the roast chamber.
In reference to the 2nd stage issue, it seems that any temperature I progra=
m
above 395 for second stage always has a readout (onboard) of 405-408 after
30-45 seconds, which I am calculating at 435 to 440 F from my previous
experiance with temp. probe. So regardless of what I program (above 395) I
will be hitting second crack in the 2nd stage within 45 to 90 seconds.
And I agree totally with the noise issue and the inability to hear the
cracks distinctly.
I hope I was able to answer your questions.
On 5/1/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
<Snip>
r
<Snip>
le
<Snip>
he
<Snip>
tch
<Snip>
o
<Snip>
and beginning of 2
<Snip>
y
<Snip>
ass
<Snip>
?
<Snip>
 a
<Snip>
y
<Snip>
-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...
(I'm the tall guy in the middle)

13) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
In this particular roast I did not have the probe installed so I can't give
you an accurate ending temp. however my onboard reading was only showing 42=
4
f.
I don't usually have problems with batch size until I go to 170 or over wit=
h
the exception of beans that produce a lot of chaff. As a matter of fact, if
I am roasting decaf and failed to retain the chaff from a previous roast I
usually go with a heavier load of beans, as this seems to help retain heat
in the roast chamber.
In reference to the 2nd stage issue, it seems that any temperature I progra=
m
above 395 for second stage always has a readout (onboard) of 405-408 after
30-45 seconds, which I am calculating at 435 to 440 F from my previous
experiance with temp. probe. So regardless of what I program (above 395) I
will be hitting second crack in the 2nd stage within 45 to 90 seconds.
And I agree totally with the noise issue and the inability to hear the
cracks distinctly.
I hope I was able to answer your questions.
On 5/1/07, Mejia, Carlos  wrote:
<Snip>
r
<Snip>
le
<Snip>
he
<Snip>
tch
<Snip>
o
<Snip>
and beginning of 2
<Snip>
y
<Snip>
ass
<Snip>
?
<Snip>
 a
<Snip>
y
<Snip>
-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...
(I'm the tall guy in the middle)


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