HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT Grits was ? (40 msgs / 1097 lines)
1) From:
my neighbor tells me that I have never had real grits.
well, I was all through "grit country.' 
I will stick with mashed potato's thanks.
ginny
---- Larry Johnson  wrote: 
<Snip>

2) From: jim gundlach
Grits, like mountain oysters are an acquired taste.  I'm multi  
cultural, grew up in cow country and lived in the South since 74, and  
I love grits and mountain oysters.  Southerners generally have a  
stronger negative reaction to mountain oysters than non-Southerners  
do to grits.  All I have to do is serve up a mess of mountain oysters  
with grits on the side and I can offend almost everyone.
      Pecan Jim
On Apr 28, 2007, at 12:05 PM,   
 wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Eddie Dove
A meal with a mission!
Love it!
Eddie
On 4/28/07, jim gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Vicki Smith
I luuuuuuuuuuv grits. I double luuuuuuuuuuuuv cheese grits. I et 'em 
with a fork. They are not the easiest things to find in Red Deer, 
Alberta. Tom's Red Mill makes something--the front of the bag says 
grits, the back of the bag says polenta. Priced like made for Manhattan 
polenta, and not the real deal. The texture is not quite there.
I get my coffee beans from SM, and a friend in Missouri sends me grits.
I can't get Ron to eat it, not in the morning with bacon and eggs, and 
not in the evening either. Boy Oh Boy, I luuuuuuuuuuuuuuuv grits.
vicki

5) From: Jim De Hoog
Vicki,
I will second your vote for cheese grits.  There is nothing like them.  I can remember the first time I loved them, December 25, 1993 fixed by a true Texan.  They were wonderful.
Jim "Ice Bucket Roaster" De Hoog 
Just finished roasting 1.5# of Moka Kadir to a FC+ for two friends.
----- Original Message ----
From: Vicki Smith 
To: homeroast
Sent: Saturday, April 28, 2007 8:46:50 PM
Subject: Re: +OT Grits was ?
I luuuuuuuuuuv grits. I double luuuuuuuuuuuuv cheese grits. I et 'em 
with a fork. They are not the easiest things to find in Red Deer, 
Alberta. Tom's Red Mill makes something--the front of the bag says 
grits, the back of the bag says polenta. Priced like made for Manhattan 
polenta, and not the real deal. The texture is not quite there.
I get my coffee beans from SM, and a friend in Missouri sends me grits.
I can't get Ron to eat it, not in the morning with bacon and eggs, and 
not in the evening either. Boy Oh Boy, I luuuuuuuuuuuuuuuv grits.
vicki

6) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-5--197238216
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I once scandalized a waitress in a Nashville Waffle House by  
insisting on making cheese grits with grated Parmesan.  (Tasted just  
like polenta).
On Apr 28, 2007, at 8:46 PM, Vicki Smith wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
--Apple-Mail-5--197238216
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
I once scandalized a waitress in =
a Nashville Waffle House by insisting on making cheese grits with grated =
Parmesan.  (Tasted just like polenta).
On Apr 28, 2007, =
at 8:46 PM, Vicki Smith wrote:
I luuuuuuuuuuv grits. I double luuuuuuuuuuuuv cheese = grits. I et 'em with a fork. They are not the easiest things to find in = Red Deer, Alberta. Tom's Red Mill makes something--the front of the bag = says grits, the back of the bag says polenta. Priced like made for = Manhattan polenta, and not the real deal. The texture is not quite = there. I get my coffee beans from SM, and a friend in = Missouri sends me grits. I can't get Ron to eat it, not = in the morning with bacon and eggs, and not in the evening either. Boy = Oh Boy, I luuuuuuuuuuuuuuuv grits. vicki homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-5--197238216--

7) From: Michael Wascher
On a driving vacation through the South years ago Jean & I stopped for a
meal. They had a varied menu: southern favorites, burgers, pizza, stir fry
...
Folks at the next table ordered stir fry; the waitress asked if they wanted
grits with that, then asked if they wanted biscuits or cornbread. I had a
burger, Jean had fried chicken. They were excellent except for the grits,
they were the wonderbread of grits.
The coffee went back, I caffeinated with Coke instead. Coffee so weak that I
thought the waitress had given me tea instead.
BTW: The best grits I've ever had were at Callaway Gardens at Pine Mountain
Georgia: stone ground whole grain grits with fresh sweet butter.
On 4/29/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Sometimes the appropriate response to reality is to go insane." -- Philip
K. Dick

8) From: Tom Ulmer
True grits would be served on the side of brains and eggs...

9) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-6--166844036
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I once went to a wedding at Juxa Plantation, which by then was a B&B  
on steroids, in Union, SC (the bride's family owned the place).   
They'd been written up in Gourmet magazine.  One of the dishes on the  
buffet was beef Stroganoff....over grits rather than noodles.  Pretty  
tasty, I must say. The Shrimp Newburg also went very well with grits.
On Apr 29, 2007, at 7:57 AM, Michael Wascher wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
--Apple-Mail-6--166844036
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
I once went to a wedding at Juxa =
Plantation, which by then was a B&B on steroids, in Union, SC (the =
bride's family owned the place).  They'd been written up in Gourmet =
magazine.  One of the dishes on the buffet was beef Stroganoff....over =
grits rather than noodles.  Pretty tasty, I must say. The Shrimp =
Newburg also went very well with grits.
On Apr 29, 2007, at =
7:57 AM, Michael Wascher wrote:
On a = driving vacation through the South years ago Jean & I stopped for a = meal. They had a varied menu: southern favorites, burgers, pizza, stir = fry  ... Folks at the next table ordered stir fry; the = waitress asked if they wanted grits with that, then asked if they wanted = biscuits or cornbread. I had a burger, Jean had fried chicken. They were = excellent except for the grits, they were the wonderbread of grits. = The coffee went back, I caffeinated with Coke instead. Coffee so = weak that I thought the waitress had given me tea instead. = BTW: The best grits I've ever had were at Callaway Gardens at Pine = Mountain Georgia: stone ground whole grain grits with fresh sweet = butter. On 4/29/07, Sandy Andina <sandraandina> = wrote: I once scandalized a waitress in a Nashville = Waffle House by insisting on making cheese grits with grated Parmesan.  = (Tasted just like polenta). On Apr 28, 2007, at 8:46 PM, = Vicki Smith wrote: I luuuuuuuuuuv grits. I double luuuuuuuuuuuuv = cheese grits. I et 'em with a fork. They are not the easiest things to = find in Red Deer, Alberta. Tom's Red Mill makes something--the front of = the bag says grits, the back of the bag says polenta. Priced like made = for Manhattan polenta, and not the real deal. The texture is not quite = there. I get my coffee beans from SM, and a friend in = Missouri sends me grits. I can't get Ron to eat it, = not in the morning with bacon and eggs, and not in the evening either. = Boy Oh Boy, I luuuuuuuuuuuuuuuv grits. vickihomeroast mailing list =http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTochange your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings= Sandy Andinawww.sandyandina.com<= A href="http://www.myspace.com/sandyandina"target="_blank" = onclick="return top.js.OpenExtLink(window,event,this)"> = www.myspace.com/sandyandina =
-- = "Sometimes the appropriate response to reality is to go insane." -- = Philip K. Dick Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-6--166844036--

10) From: Larry Johnson
Now, this man has had the good stuff.
On 4/29/07, Michael Wascher  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
Never give a party if you will be the most interesting person there.  -
Mickey Friedman

11) From: Silvia Marsh
Shrimp and grits. End of story. Decadence itself.
Silvia
On 4/29/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: jim gundlach
--Apple-Mail-25--158108391
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charsetO-8859-1;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Grits, like coffee is pretty bad when you stick to the mainstream.   
Carefully produced and cooked, good grits are no more like the  
supermarket instant or quick grits than the coffee we get from Tom,  
home roast, and carefully brew is like Folgers instant.  I suspect  
that many here who say they do not like grits are in the same boat  
that people who don't like coffee because they have only tasted  
Folgers. Since I live in the heart of Dixie, I even live in an old  
plantation home, I have access to good locally produced grits.  In  
anticipation of "please send me some requests, I will instead post a  
link, Tom does not sell grits so this is OK, to a source of good  
grits that does ship.  They are a little  pricey but we are not  
talking big money here:
    http://stores.homestead.com/KKing1/Categories.bok?category=GritsWhat I find interesting is that both grits and masa de maíz,  
sometimes also called masa harina, are both made by soaking corn in  
an alkaline solution.  And that a diet based on corn without some of  
it treated this way results in pellagra.  For more information on  
this condition go to:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/PellagraWithout borrowing this bit of Native American knowledge, the Old  
South would have never existed.
    Pecan Jim
On Apr 29, 2007, at 10:48 AM, Larry Johnson wrote:
<Snip>
--Apple-Mail-25--158108391
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Grits, like coffee is pretty bad =
when you stick to the mainstream.  Carefully produced and cooked, good =
grits are no more like the supermarket instant or quick grits than =
the coffee we get from Tom, home roast, and carefully brew is like =
Folgers instant.  I suspect that many here who say they do not like =
grits are in the same boat that people who don't like coffee because =
they have only tasted Folgers. Since I live in the heart of Dixie, I =
even live in an old plantation home, I have access to good locally =
produced grits.  In anticipation of "please send me some requests, I =
will instead post a link, Tom does not sell grits so this is OK, to a =
source of good grits that does ship.  They are a little  pricey =
but we are not talking big money here:
    What I find =">http://stores.homestead.com/KKing1/Categories.bok?category=Gritsclass="3D"khtml-block-placeholder"">What I find = interesting is that both grits and masa de maíz, sometimes also called = masa harina, are both made by soaking corn in an alkaline solution.  = And that a diet based on corn without some of it treated this way = results in pellagra.  For more information on this condition go = to:         Without borrowing this bit =">http://en.wikipedia.org/wik=i/Pellagra 
Without borrowing this bit = of Native American knowledge, the Old South would have never = existed.
  =  Pecan Jim On Apr 29, 2007, at 10:48 AM, Larry = Johnson wrote:
Now, this man = has had the good stuff. On 4/29/07, Michael Wascher <wascher> = wrote: BTW: The best grits I've ever had were at Callaway = Gardens at Pine Mountain Georgia: stone ground whole grain grits with = fresh sweet butter. -- Larry J Never = give a party if you will be the most interesting person there.  -  = Mickey = Friedman homeroa= st mailing list http://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast To change your = personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to = http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<= BR>= --Apple-Mail-25--158108391--

13) From: Floyd Lozano
I think it may be a while before we see a specialty site dedicating to
'gritting' boutique and single origin hominy though...
-F
ps whenever I see stuff like that (processing of corn) without any apparent
origin other than serendipity, it makes me wonder how we ever got that
knowledge.  maybe they originally thought that they were getting sick and
had to cook the corn in something to remove or clean the grain better and a=
s
a result accidentally ended up fortifying it.  curious!
On 4/29/07, jim gundlach  wrote:
<Snip>
way
<Snip>

14) From: Angelo
Does anyone know the difference between grits and polenta, besides 
the spelling?
A

15) From: Stephanie Baker
Hello everyone.  I'm new and an incredible food nerd and decided to  
make my first post a response to this for some reason.
The differences are... minor at best.  Polenta is traditionally  
yellow, grits are traditionally white, and hominy grits are treated  
with a weak mixture of lye and water at some point. (although either  
can be made with either white or yellow corn)
Beyond that it's usually what ingredients you use and what you call  
it.  (according to Alton Brown you cook polenta with stock and grits  
with milk, although I'm guessing even that can depend on what one's  
family has always done.
Stephanie Baker
On Apr 29, 2007, at 10:36 AM, Angelo wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Michael Wascher
A while back, where I used to work, we discussed grits & polenta at the
lunch table. I opined that they were the same. The table had an Italian and
a Southerner. Both of them jumped on that statement. Neither could tell me
what was different, what made their version of corn gruel better, but they
were united against my statement.
On 4/29/07, Angelo  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Sometimes the appropriate response to reality is to go insane." -- Philip
K. Dick

17) From: miKe mcKoffee
Stephanie,
Welcome to the Sweet Maria's home roast Grits list! Don't be alarmed if
there are occasional coffee related posts:-)
PS FWIW this is not meant as any form of rebuke or chiding. (I only add this
because you're new to the List and don't want to scare you away:-)
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
 
<Snip>

18) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
If France had made the Louisiana Purchase deal with Italy there might be
considered no difference!
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Wascher
Sent: Sunday, April 29, 2007 12:56 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +OT Grits was ?
A while back, where I used to work, we discussed grits & polenta at the
lunch table. I opined that they were the same. The table had an Italian and
a Southerner. Both of them jumped on that statement. Neither could tell me
what was different, what made their version of corn gruel better, but they
were united against my statement.
On 4/29/07, Angelo  wrote: 
Does anyone know the difference between grits and polenta, besides
the spelling?
A

19) From: Larry Johnson
I'm pretty sure that polenta is made from plain corn meal. Grits are not
corn meal; they are ground up kernels of hominy which is corn that has had
the tough outer husk dissolved in a lye/water solution. Compare hominy to
regular corn. They're very different, in taste as well as appearance. Grind
dried corn and you get corn meal. Grind dried hominy and you get grits.
Larry J
"I could be wrong ....but I don't think so."  -  Charles Barkley
On 4/29/07, Michael Wascher  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
Never give a party if you will be the most interesting person there.  -
Mickey Friedman

20) From: miKe mcKoffee
I usually open pan roast steel cut oats before making oatmeal to bring out
more nutty toasty flavor. Not a dark roast but very light cinnamon roast if
that, actually just touch of 1st crack. (Seriously they crack!) Does anyone
use a similar technique for grits? If so, what type of roast profile do you
use for grits?
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

21) From: Vicki Smith
Wikipedia on the subject:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polentav
Larry Johnson wrote:
<Snip>

22) From: Connelley Barton
True Southern Stone Ground Grits are Coarsely ground white corn, NOT 
Hominy.  Check out my supplier, Adlah, milled by Allen Mill, Columbia, 
South Carolina.  25 lbs. for $17.75.http://www.adluh.com/catalog/index.php?cPath=2Connelley
Vicki Smith wrote:
<Snip>

23) From: raymanowen
The steel that cuts my oats is spinning wildly in the bottom of a blender
cup. This Dummkopf never thought of roasting them before I cookum. You said
you roast cracked oats, not whole kernel, right?
I've been told my gruel is a lot like porridge. I'm done with foods that
should be on prescription basis only, when you study the ingredient list.
Whatever works, but I refuse to leave well-enough alone. If there's a right
way, I'll try the other way, too. Since the whole kernels could pop like
popcorn, I think I'll roast a cup covered with my colander.
What'll I call it if I just make a Hellacious mess- scrape it up and call it
Food?
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Ask your doctor if it's right for you. Discontinue use if you experience
rigor mortis-
On 4/29/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

24) From: Larry English
You are on target, Larry.  The flavors are so different as to be from
different planets.  They are, in fact - the Deep South and Italy may as well
be different satellites.  Anyone asking the question has never tasted both.
I do think the taste for grits is genetic - or climatic - at least
regional.  I've met very few (born and raised) Westerners who have eaten
grits more than once.  For me - once.  But I love polenta.
With coffee (and now we're back on topic, no?)
Larry
On 4/29/07, Larry Johnson  wrote:
<Snip>

25) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-9--104490805
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
Polenta is made from cornmeal, usually yellow but not always, and the  
entire kernel is ground. (There's a Romanian-Jewish equivalent called  
"mamaliga"). Grits are made from hominy, which as I understand it is  
just the inside of the corn kernel--usually white.  Polenta and  
mamaliga are served as side dishes with entrees, whereas grits are  
usually served only for breakfast; but I like them seasoned as a side  
dish as well.
On Apr 29, 2007, at 12:36 PM, Angelo wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
--Apple-Mail-9--104490805
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
Polenta is made from cornmeal, =
usually yellow but not always, and the entire kernel is ground. (There's =
a Romanian-Jewish equivalent called "mamaliga"). Grits are made from =
hominy, which as I understand it is just the inside of the corn =
kernel--usually white.  Polenta and mamaliga are served as side dishes =
with entrees, whereas grits are usually served only for breakfast; but I =
like them seasoned as a side dish as well.
On Apr 29, 2007, =
at 12:36 PM, Angelo wrote:
Does anyone know the difference between grits and = polenta, besides the spelling?A homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-9--104490805--

26) From: Justin Marquez
Maybe.... Grits ain't kosher...?
As an aside - grits - we've never really figured out if "grits" is plural or
singular.  Any faithful child of the South will tell you "Them grits is
gooood!"
BUT - they would rather have cheese grits. Plain grits alone are very bland,
so the more help they get, the better. Kinda like my ol' daddy used to say
about pumpkin pie... "Punkin' Pie is great... as long as it doesn't
taste too much like pumpkin!"
Also as a further aside - there is a pseudo-organization known as "G.R.I.T.S."
- stands for "Girls Raised In The South".
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 4/29/07, Angelo  wrote:
<Snip>

27) From: Larry Johnson
Your supplier sells both grits and cornmeal. If they're both made of ground
whole white corn, what's the difference between them? (you can't cook up a
batch of cornmeal mush and call it grits, trust me)
On 4/29/07, Connelley Barton  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
Never give a party if you will be the most interesting person there.  -
Mickey Friedman

28) From: Connelley Barton
No, you can't call mush Grits.  The cornmeal and grits most people have 
eaten has had the germ and bran removed so that it has a shelf life.  
Real grits( or real cornmeal for that matter) must be fresh; it will 
turn rancid in three weeks.  Nowadays, we can buy 25 lbs. and keep it in 
the freezer.  I've been eating grits from a South Carolina mill since I 
was a kid( I'm now 70).
Connelley
Larry Johnson wrote:
<Snip>

29) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 4/30/07, Connelley Barton  wrote:
<Snip>
Connelley,
Where do you live now?
Brian

30) From: Brian Fowler
I had my first real grits experience a couple of weekends ago and it was 
taaastey.  Shrimp and Grits in Charleston, SC are really hard to beat.
Brian

31) From: Leo Zick
no self respectin southerner eats instant grits. i take pride in ma grits
On 4/30/07, Brian Fowler  wrote:
<Snip>

32) From: John David Huddle
Wow!!!   Does that bring back great memories!  My dad would fix biscuits, 
grits and brains & eggs for Sunday morning breakfast before Church.  Yum!  
(We drank Maryland Club or Maxwell House drip brew back then.)
My wife won't touch brains & eggs and doesn't like grits.  :(
Dave
- who grew up in Ft. Worth, Texas
"True grits would be served on the side of brains and eggs"
Interest Rates NEAR 39yr LOWS!  $430,000 Mortgage for $1,299/mo - Calculate 
new payment http://www.lowermybills.com/lre/index.jsp?sourceid=lmb-9632-19132&moid888

33) From: RK
I love shrimp and grits and not to far up the road from Charleston SC, in 
Columbia SC is a place called The Red Bone Inn. and they do Shrimp and Grits 
real Justice.
Something I came up to go with a good morning cup of coffee was to take last 
nights left over grits, that have now sat up quite well, and slice them into 
2" Squares, lightly coat with flour and deep fry them until they are golden 
brown, add butter and maple syrup. yummy.
RK

34) From: Lynne Biziewski
I never had grits in my life (love shrimp, tho), but cold pizza (my own, of
course) is terrific with morning coffee.
L.
On 5/3/07, RK  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Who knows where inspiration comes from. Perhaps it arises from desperation.
Perhaps it comes from the flukes of the universe, the kindness of the
muses."
Amy Tan

35) From:
Ron:
rather like having corn meal mush or polenta?
sounds good.
thanks.
send me some grits.
ginny
---- RK  wrote: 
<Snip>

36) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 5/3/07, RK  wrote:
<Snip>
Ron,
I can't find the Red Bone Inn listed in the Columbia phone book. Do you
happen to recall the address?
Thanks,
Brian

37) From: RK
<Snip>
Yes its fried the same way, I also like corn meal mush and Polenta.
I was born and raised in Maryland and corn meal mush was a regular breakfast 
treat at my house. So when I moved to SC and found grits to be more popular 
then corn meal mush (unheard of in SC ) I said why not fried grits, so I 
tried it and found it be quite yummy.
Along with a nice DP Harrar double shot americano, makes for a really nice 
breakfast.
Cheers
Ron

38) From: RK
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
It may have been named Redbone Alley?
Take 77 bypass around Columbia  towards Charlotte and exit at fort Dix =
can't remember the exit # head toward Columbia and its about 1/4 to 1/2 =
mile on the left. There is strip mall behind it and a few other =
restaurants
This has been 4 yrs since I have been their so it is quite possible it =
has changed hands, but it has not you need to try them out great food.
 They also have restaurants in Florence and Sumter.

39) From: Brian Kamnetz
Ron,
I heard back from the folks at Redbone, as immediately below:
<Snip>
Brian,
Thanks for your interest in Redbone Alley and thanks for pointing out
our error.  We no longer have the Columbia location open.  We look
forward to a visit from you at our Sumter or Florence stores.
Have a Doggone good day!
Heidi Toms
On 5/3/07, RK  wrote:
<Snip>

40) From: RK
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Thanks Brian I hate they closed that location. I really enjoyed eating =
there.
Cheers RK


HomeRoast Digest