HomeRoast Digest


Topic: What do baked beans taste like? (9 msgs / 210 lines)
1) From: Randall Nortman
So speaking of coffee terms, I don't think I've come across a
description of what beans actually taste like when they've been
"baked" by bad roasting, other than they they don't taste very good.
As a newb, when I end up with a batch that doesn't taste very good,
I'm often not sure if it's baked or if something else has gone wrong,
because I don't know what "baked" tastes like.
Case in point -- I roasted some Sulawesi a couple of days ago, and due
to some difficulty in getting good temperature readings, I'm pretty
sure I stopped the roast too soon, and furthermore probably clamped
down on the heater (which I have wired to a dimmer for control) way
too early in the process.  I was aiming for FC+, and I think I
probably got C.  The coffee is certainly drinkable, but sourish, and
there's nothing particularly appealing about it.  It is getting better
with rest, but I doubt it's ever going to taste as good as most of my
roasts.  Is this slightly baked, or just under-roasted?  I assume
there is a difference, but heck if I know how to tell.
-- 
Randall

2) From: miKe mcKoffee
Sounds under roasted not baked. FWIW next time that happens immediately
re-roast 'em with a fast profile.
Baked is more like flat and lifeless with no real character be it sour or
otherwise. Caused by stalling or way to slow a roast.
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
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3) From: Ken Mary
I believe, but not 100% sure, that baking results from spending too much 
time in the 250 to 400F range. "Too much time" could be about 10 minutes or
more. Baked beans according to others have a sweet flavor but not much else,
no brightness and very low complexity of flavors. I have done many roasts
that purposely violated the too much time limit and had excellent results. I
could be one of those who likes the baked profile. This could also be
explained by the overall good quality of the coffee that we buy. Lower grade
coffees may have a much more narrow roast range with even the slightest
deviation from the ideal profile resulting in bad coffee.
If you aim for a city roast and stop short, the coffee may have a "wet brown
paper" taste, in my experience.
If you reach first crack at a reasonable time, but slow or stall between
first and second, the brightness will be low, and the flavors will still be
very good but mellowed.
A stall during first will give low brightness and flat flavors. This type of
stall is all too easy to achieve. The roast must have enough speed going
into first and enough heat to keep the temperature rising at a reasonable
rate, maybe 2C or 4F per minute or higher. Timing the heat reduction is
critical here, too much heat will run quickly into second and possibly out
of control. The stall is coused by the rush of water vapor leaving the bean
during first crack. After this water is gone, the beans need very little
heat to keep the temperature rising.
--
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4) From: Randall Nortman
So, what I'm hearing is that "baked" isn't a flavor in itself, rather
it is a lack of flavor.  Sounds to me, actually, like non-connoisseurs
might actually *like* a baked roast, then -- if it comes out sweet and
not much else -- given that most people are used to coffee tasting
awful before they add cream and sugar.
On Tue, May 01, 2007 at 06:32:10AM -0700, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
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5) From: miKe mcKoffee
Baked beans aren't necessarily sweet and if really baked just flat and
lifeless and not much distinguishing taste at all sweet or otherwise 'cept
cardboard maybe. (Though I usually do use a touch of both dark brown sugar
and mollasses in baked beans:-)
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
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6) From: Ed Needham
...and they are hard as rocks when grinding.  You will hear the difference.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

7) From: miKe mcKoffee
Good point. And lighter because moisture all but gone. Of course which is
why they be harder... 
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

8) From: raymanowen
Mo 'lasses? Ain't had none yet. The SO2 in some 'lasses used to throttle me
as a kid. -ro
On 5/1/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
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9) From: raymanowen
"I roasted some Sulawesi a couple of days ago, and due
to some difficulty in getting good temperature readings, I'm pretty
sure I stopped the roast too soon...
[Temperature measurement is Not a good checkpoint for defining roasting
progress, Unless:
   - You are using an existing instrumented roaster,
   - You are following a profile established by the roastmaster, and
   - You are using the established quantity and specific bean origin-
In other words, you're duplicating an established profile in the existing
roaster.]
If you visited Sweet Maria's while Tom was roasting, and made careful notes
of his roasting profiles, maybe you could duplicate one of his roasts using
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on that same roaster unless you used His temperature probe in situ. Wanna
play?
Unfortunately, SM is not a Hobby Roaster shop, any more than Shell Oil Co.
provides a drag strip or an oval track for you to use the gasoline you buy.
Also, coffee roasting and brewing has not been reduced to numbers, like you
push on an elevator car when you want to get to a certain floor.
"I was aiming for FC+, and I think I probably got C.  The coffee is
certainly drinkable, but sourish, and
there's nothing particularly appealing about it.  It is getting better with
rest... "
[Again, this "C and FC+" are the ratings of some other person with their own
sensibilities and prejudices.]
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
"I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work."  - -Thomas
A. Edison


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