HomeRoast Digest


Topic: high altitude roasting (13 msgs / 330 lines)
1) From: Matthew Henkel
Frank Awbrey wrote:
<Snip>
I must says that I haven't really considered the altitude here in Denver
when roasting--of course I use a stircrazy with the hot plate on all the
time so the effectiveness of the air would be less of a factor.  Boiling
water is a different story (boiling is usually around 201F at my
house).  If you really want to test the roasting we'd need to make some
plans.  We could follow the lead of some homebrewers and take our gear
up Mt. Bierstadt (14ft) to test it there. ;-)  Of course we'd probably
have to rig a small gas powered fluid bed machine...
~/Matt

2) From: Tomenid
High Altitude Roasting
 
I'm experimenting with times and temps for high altitude roasting (we're at  
6100 feet in the lower Colorado Rockies) and wondered what success other 
people  have had with times and temps, especially in creating a dark roast.
 
Tom
**************Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch "Cooking with 
Tyler Florence" on AOL Food.      
http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video=4?&NCID=aolfod00030000000002)Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

3) From: Brian Kamnetz
I used to live in New Mexico at 6500 feet, and my air popper roasted
MUCH faster up there than it can down here at sea level.
Brian
On Thu, Jun 5, 2008 at 2:46 PM,   wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

4) From: Bob
Tom,
I'm in Parker CO, about 900' below you. No real issues getting a =
dark roast using any of my machines ~ Gene' Café, HG/BM, SC/TO, =
or even the Zach & Dani. In fact, it's usually the opposite, =
trying to keep them at a City+ to Full City before they hit =
second crack.
Bob
--------------------------------------------------
From: 
Sent: Thursday, June 05, 2008 12:46 PM
To: 
Subject: [Homeroast] High ALtitude Roasting
High Altitude Roasting
I'm experimenting with times and temps for high altitude =
roasting (we're at
6100 feet in the lower Colorado Rockies) and wondered what =
success other
people  have had with times and temps, especially in creating a =
dark roast.
Tom
**************Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch =
"Cooking with
Tyler Florence" on AOL Food.
http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video=4?&NCID=aolfod00030000000002)Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee=.com
Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) : =http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820=
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee=.com
Homeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/=gallery/main.php?g2_itemId=7820

5) From: Tomenid
I should have explained that I have no trouble achieving a dark roast at  
high altitude. The problem is getting to a dark roast so quickly at our  
altitude. I was using the IRoaster and the setting for city roast led to  billowing 
white smoke and a nice collection of charcoal; the dark roast setting,  well, 
I'm surprised the volunteer fire department didn't show up. I've now  
experimented with different times and temps and rarely go more than 8 1/2  minues, 5 at 
400, 1.30 at 425 and 2.00 at 450 and this seems to work well,  though it might 
be darker than most people would like. I was just interested in  what other 
people found that worked--what's the lowest temperature to get a  crack?
 
Tom
**************Get trade secrets for amazing burgers. Watch "Cooking with 
Tyler Florence" on AOL Food.      
http://food.aol.com/tyler-florence?video=4?&NCID=aolfod00030000000002)Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

6) From: Bill
Tom,  what kind of roasting method are you using?  I agree with Bob, so I'm
curious what's happening that's making it difficult to get to a darker
roast...
bill in wyo
6000 feet.
On Thu, Jun 5, 2008 at 12:46 PM,  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

7) From: raymanowen
"...what kind of roasting method are you using?"
[Probably the same path to roasting success that has been followed by
Kaldi's successors.]
Two appliances that have worked for me at 5316 ft:
One makes heat, and I can control it;
The other meters the passage of time and I can only watch it operate.
More of either one, and the roast darkens at this elevation. Must be the
altitude...
Cheers, iechyd da -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

8) From: Peter Genuardi
Tom -
Last night I experimented with a whirley pop up here at 5363 feet.  I
followed all of the profile info i could find online and in a few books.  i
tried to keep the heat to 400 when i loaded the beans and not let it drop
below 300.  i tried two batches and made charcoal both times.
The first i tried on my electric stovetop.  first crack at like 3:19.
smoked like crazy.  i got bored waiting for second crack at nine mins, and
realized it all just happened before the 5 min. mark.
The second i tried outside (due to house smelling like fire and risk of
divorce with another smoky batch) on my campstove.  Attempted same temps and
got same results.
Part of this is due, i think to my heat source being to hot and not
diffused.
But, I have to think that it also has something to do with the
altitude...given that i didn't find anyone else reporting these issues.
My next attempt will involve keeping the temp lower and bringing it up more
slowly.
Anyone have suggestions for getting this smoke smell out of the house?  I'll
be buying a few gallons of febreeze later.
 - Peter
On Fri, Jun 6, 2008 at 7:34 PM,  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

9) From: Bill
Tom,
fluid air bed roasters ARE affected by altitude.  It has to do with the
density of the air at elevation, if I understand it correctly.  I asked the
same question 6 months ago in regards to my Freshie.  So I don't have an
IRoast so I can't give you specific information.  I would just invite you to
experiment with lower settings until you find that you like it.  First crack
generally occurs around 400F, but the temp readout on the IRoast is air
temp, not bean temp, so it doesn't tell you a whole lot...  so keep
experimenting!  But yes, all of your air roasts will be faster than those at
sea level...
happy roasting!
bill in wyo
On Fri, Jun 6, 2008 at 7:34 PM,  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

10) From: Brian Kamnetz
Using a Poppery II at 6500 feet in New Mexico, what worked for me was
to cut the amount of beans roasted at a time. It was suggested to me
to start with 1/3 cup of greens and then slowly increase, and that
worked well for mr.
Brian
On Mon, Jun 9, 2008 at 12:38 PM, Bill  wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

11) From: Bill
Peter,
Used a SS stovetop popper for a while before I gave up, it just wasn't for
me.  As far as I've heard, altitude doesn't affect a conduction roaster like
a stovetop popper, it only affects convection roasters.  So I would just
think that your heat source is too high.
After a few experiments I found out the correct heat settings for my stove
to get 1st crack at 9 minutes and 2nd crack at 12...
I got too frustrated though with multiple batches and so went to a heat gun
setup.
Hope that helps.  Welcome to the list, by the way.
bill in wyo
On Mon, Jun 9, 2008 at 10:32 AM, Peter Genuardi 
wrote:
<Snip>
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

12) From: Frank Awbrey
I roast using a cheap hot air popper at altitude (7000+ ft). I have no
problem getting to second crack. I have to use an extension cord and lean my
popper about 30 to 45* to help extend the roast. I can now roast
consistently 9-10 minute roasts. A lot depends on the ambient temperature.
I've also roasted 3 or 4 roasts using a whirley pop on my electric stove
inside. The one thing I have learned about that is to not worry too much
about the temperature of the roast. Without doing mods to insert a probe, it
is just too difficult, at least for me, to determine the temperature. What I
do is listen for the crack mostly and look at the color of the roast. That
seems to work for me.
I do not preheat using this method. I think I use a medium or slightly less
than that for heat setting. As I remember correctly (been a couple of
months), I get to first crack somewhere around 10-12 minutes, and finish up
around 14-15 minutes. I don't like to go into second crack much at all, so
usually start the cooling process as soon as I hear second crack. The roasts
have turned out fine for me. I wish I could use this method more often, but
the wife won't let me roast in the house because of the smoke (I've only
roasted using this method when she is away for 3 or 4 days at a time-:>)).
On 6/9/08, Bill  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Frank
"Still the one"
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20

13) From: raymanowen
Ya gotta ask yourself two things:
   1. When you turn on the Hotsy Roaster, don't flames or electric heat
   apply heat to Air?
   2. What happens to beans that are in this Air?
If you can measure this hot air temperature, it's a good clue as to the
temperature of the beans. They can't just sit there and refuse to get hot,
and they're unlikely to get hotter than their environment.
For things placed in Hell, they'll neither stay 'Cool as a cucumber,' nor
get Hotter Than Hell. Maybe it's stifling, but Hell is a good temperature
regulator. Kind of like Needles and Bakersfield in Ca.
Cheers, Mabuhay -RayO, aka Opa!
On Mon, Jun 9, 2008 at 10:38 AM, Bill  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976
Homeroast mailing list
Homeroasthttp://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20">http://lists.sweetmariascoffee.com/listinfo.cgi/homeroast-sweetmariascoffee.comHomeroast community pictures -upload yours!) :http://www.homeroasting.com/gallery/main.php?g2_itemIdx20


HomeRoast Digest