HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Diedrich hom roaster: Was Behmor 1600 (8 msgs / 243 lines)
1) From: Jason
While on the topic of the expensive home roaster... I was curious and
reading about these the other day.  While this is not something that
you would really have the option of dragging out when you want to use
it, it would fall more into the design of having one built into your
kitchen.  I was curious if anyone had experience with these in the
past and what kind of results they got from them.  I know the cost on
them is pretty darn high also $3800... which is almost the cost for
the stove I want to put into the kitchen when I move... ouch

2) From:
jason,
you forgot something.
g
---- Jason  wrote: 
<Snip>

3) From: Robert Joslin
Jason
     There are several people on the list who roast with the Diedrich HR-1.
I have used mine for over a year and find that it is capable of producing
excellent roasts. As miKe has pointed out, profiling a roast is more
difficult with this machine, particularly when using loads of 450 grams of
beans.  Much of the fun of roasting with the HR-1 is discovering how to
effect certain outcomes.  The response time of the heating elements and the
effects of drum air controls can only be learned with experimentation (or
perhaps, a roasting class at Sand Point).  Like Ginny, I still love my
Hottop and occasionally roast with it, but the Diedrich is my darling.  I
don't drag it out.  It has its own building, a roasting shed filled with
coffee paraphenalia, its own stainless steel table, and its own stainless
steel venting  I can tell you it would look very handsome in any kitchen.  I
have missed the fun of putting together and learning to use a drum roaster
and I very much admire people who have the talent and have done so. I enjoy
following their posts on this forum.  At the time this seemed to be the best
way for me and I do not regret having gone down this
path.                                                               Josh
On 5/23/07, pchforever  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Linda Sharpe
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Josh:
I've had my machine for 20 months and have wonderful results until last week
when the digital thermostat began to register lower than the drum temp.
First crack was off and the beans had a scorched flavor.  I've been able to
roast and plan to call Diedrich's help desk to remedy the problem.  My
machine is on a ss trolley and has ss shelving all to it's self, great piece
of equipment, this is the first issue I've had.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Robert Joslin
Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2007 7:39 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +Diedrich hom roaster: Was Behmor 1600
Jason
     There are several people on the list who roast with the Diedrich HR-1.
I have used mine for over a year and find that it is capable of producing
excellent roasts. As miKe has pointed out, profiling a roast is more
difficult with this machine, particularly when using loads of 450 grams of
beans.  Much of the fun of roasting with the HR-1 is discovering how to
effect certain outcomes.  The response time of the heating elements and the
effects of drum air controls can only be learned with experimentation (or
perhaps, a roasting class at Sand Point).  Like Ginny, I still love my
Hottop and occasionally roast with it, but the Diedrich is my darling.  I
don't drag it out.  It has its own building, a roasting shed filled with
coffee paraphenalia, its own stainless steel table, and its own stainless
steel venting  I can tell you it would look very handsome in any kitchen.  I
have missed the fun of putting together and learning to use a drum roaster
and I very much admire people who have the talent and have done so. I enjoy
following their posts on this forum.  At the time this seemed to be the best
way for me and I do not regret having gone down this path.
Josh 
On 5/23/07, pchforever  wrote: 
jason,
you forgot something.
g
---- Jason  wrote:
<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

5) From: Les
Thanks Josh and Linda for sharing your Diedrich experiences.  Please share
more.  Our drool will only be on the computer, not your machines.  Now to go
and read my "Ode to the RK." again.
Les
On 5/23/07, Linda Sharpe  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Robert Joslin
Linda
     Sorry to hear about your problem.  I am betting that the repair will be
pretty straight forward..... just a remove and replace part (temp probe,
perhaps?)  The machine is built like a tank and is fairly easy to
disassemble, although considering the cost of these units, an exploded
diagram would have been a nice thing for the manufacturer to provide in
order to make the first disassembly a little less stressful.
     I have often wondered about the motor.  When doing multiple back to
back roasts the motor housing seems to get awfully hot.  I think (hope) this
is normal and represents heat conducted from the drum through the gearbox
and motor shaft.   Can you confortably hold your hand on the motor housing
immediately after a roasting session?
     How is your unit vented?  Do you use stainless flex tubing and if so
what length?  OK! Interrogation is over for now!
(grin).                                       Josh
On 5/24/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Greg Scace
I don't have any experience with the Diedrich.  Ken Fox wrote an 
article about it on home barista, if you're interested.  Not sure if 
I agree with the premise.
I'm one of those relatively quiet folks who have a commercial roaster 
in his house.  I have a Has Garanti electric 1 kg capacity drum 
roaster.  It's completely manually operated, which is somewhat 
anomalous for me since I'm stridently attempting to improve espresso 
process control.  I don't say a whole lot about it because it's 
pretty much of a one-off roaster, I've learned to use it, and I don't 
have to do a whole helluva lot to make it work.  I'm not modding 
barbeques, adapting heat guns, poppers.  For me, roasting is a path 
to a better cup.  I'm interested in roasting because I'm interested 
in bringing out the best that i can from the coffee in all stages of 
its preparation.  So it's my attempts at producing quality raw 
materials that is of interest to me, not my attempts at building a roaster.
My opinion and observation about small commercial roasters for 
hobbyist use is that for the most part home roasters are like most 
hobbyists - they are incredibly cheap.  Folks can take whatever 
offense they want from that remark, but none is intended.  Hobbyists 
aren't making a living at coffee, so bullet-proof industrial 
equipment reliability at high duty cycles isn't necessary.  And many 
folks have other necessary uses for their money besides their 
hobbies.  That makes it really hard for a roaster manufacturer to 
build a high-quality small roaster.  The complexity doesn't 
particularly diminish when size is scaled down.  There is no economy 
of scale to speak of because the market is small.  So a roaster 
manufacturer that produces a small roaster in the 1 to 2 lb capacity 
range is really sticking his neck out.  From what I know now about 
making small batch specialty equipment, I bet Diedrich doesn't make 
squat on their investment in producing their small roaster - at least 
from hobbyists.  They might make something if the thing has any 
commercial appeal.
One can make a case that financial emphasis is wrongly placed on 
brewing equipment.  Many folks spend quite a bit of money on espresso 
machines, but are reluctant to spend money on grinders.  Those who 
roast seem even less inclined to spend money on roasters.  It's 
almost a badge of honor to produce roasted coffee on the simplest 
possible gear.  That's OK if the simplest possible gear produces 
results that are equal to those produced by commercial roasting 
equipment.  I've sampled some coffee this year that have thrown the 
idea of simplicity over all into question - for me at least.  An 
outfit from Nebraska called Coffee Emergency was selling a Yemen 
(roasted by them) that was like drinking liquid sugar and 
chocolate.  I was fortunate enough to taste coffees from Terroir that 
were uniformly excellent.  And I recently sampled  from 49th Parallel 
Roasters that was extremely high-quality as well.  They put my 
roasting self in my place for sure, and support the idea recently 
advanced by Marshall Fuss that if you home-roast you should also be 
sampling commercial roasted coffees because it's easy to think that 
you are a roasting god until you sample coffees that are 
substantially better than yours.  One may correctly state that 
sourcing coffee is an art / obsession on its own.  Thankfully we have 
people like Tom who can help us with that aspect of coffee.  Once the 
coffee is in our hot little hands, we get the chance to make it great 
or ruin it.   You'd think that the roasting community would support 
manufacturers that produced quality roasters that allowed us to work 
on the craft of roasting, not on the machinery.
Not sure if this diatribe is useful discussion.  I've been away and 
my daughter has been sick.  I'm not firing on all cylinders.
-Greg
At 03:14 PM 5/23/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Les
     Greg said,
  I've sampled some coffee this year that have thrown the
idea of simplicity over all into question - for me at least.  An
outfit from Nebraska called Coffee Emergency was selling a Yemen
(roasted by them) that was like drinking liquid sugar and
chocolate.  I was fortunate enough to taste coffees from Terroir that
were uniformly excellent.  And I recently sampled  from 49th Parallel
Roasters that was extremely high-quality as well.  They put my
roasting self in my place for sure, and support the idea recently
advanced by Marshall Fuss that if you home-roast you should also be
sampling commercial roasted coffees because it's easy to think that
you are a roasting god until you sample coffees that are
substantially better than yours.
Greg you make a good point!  One roaster that can help you a lot is Sweet
Marias. Yes I said roaster.  Sweet Marias roasts coffee.   I have found
ordering coffee from Tom and roasting the same coffee from the same lot in
my roaster on the same day, gives me a direct comparison of my roasting
skills on my roaster to his commercial roaster.  So if I have Panama xyz in
the stash and Tom is roasting Panama xyz on a Monday, I will order it and
also roast my Panama xyz from my stash which should be coming from the same
lot of coffee he is using.  I have honed my skills.  I have also had awesome
coffee from Stumptown, Blue Bottle, and Barefoot roasters.  One other point
Greg is sharing homeroast with other homeroasters.  Alchemist John, Doug
Boutell, Plain Mike, and Mike McKoffee have all shared home roast and
insights with me to improve my roasting skills.  So my enouragement to this
group is suck up the pride and have the courage to share your homeroast with
some other roasters and seek constructive criticism.  I would hope that we
are all trying to make the best coffee possible.
Les


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