HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Got Gas? (7 msgs / 265 lines)
1) From: john nanavati
I don't know if this is a 'duh but it's something that I'm realizing /
starting to track.
I've started paying attention to my beans' de-gassing process and wonder if
this is an indicator of roast quality.
I just roasted a second batch of SM's Liquid Amber to FC+ - Vienna and am
finding the second batch to de-gas more than the first. I also find that th=
e
gas that's coming from the second batch is sweeter and "more inviting."
This second batch won't be ready until tomorrow (Saturday), but the first
batch was okay in the cup.
I use the re-sealable bags from SM to store and de-gas my beans and have
commonly found that beans that de-gas more have a much better aroma and
flavor.
I used to think that longer roasts promoted more gas; for example, my Papua
New Guinea Peaberry (City+) didn't really de-gas much and was an okay cup.
Where as the Java Government (FC+) de-gassed a wonderfully sweet aroma and
was a great cup. I know that my example is comparing beans that have
different qualities as opposed to the same bean, but this is a new concept
to me and can only go with what I know.
Does the amount of de-gassing indicate anything? Quality of the roast, or
the bean's processing technique (wet vs dry), acidity, or roast level, …
Any thoughts about this?
Ps. Of course there's the obvious pun about being ironic that beans have ga=
s
as opposed to giving it to us – but I couldn't figure out the best
wording -- Brett. I'm counting on you ;- )
John Nanavati, DHI, CIT
Plainfield, New Jersey

2) From: Ed Needham
As most are aware, I'm not a big fan of sitting around waiting for my beans 
to degas or rest so take this with whatever experience and persuasion you 
wish to apply.
Remember...whatever goes into the air does not go into the cup. Those 
dancing aromas that smell so good as they waft from the coffee as it is 
'resting' are gone forever.
'Maybe' a coffee improves over time.  I have not had that experience.  I 
know it definitely changes over time, but for me, that change is diminished 
discreet flavors, blended flavors and muted high notes.  I'll argue against 
myself here.  Using an analogy of music... in sound recording that the most 
critical recording might not be preferable because it shows every flaw and 
might be too articulated, harsh or cloying.  Some of the best music is 
recorded with diminished tones or with discreet sounds and with high notes 
muted either purposefully or due to poor recording (Louie Louie, anything 
Sun or Motown, Twist and Shout...for examples).  Stevie Wonder set the curve 
for capturing every possible nuance of the music and even pioneered digital 
recording techniques.  Musicians many times prefer tube amplifiers over 
their transistorized counterparts because they reproduce sounds less harshly 
and more rounded.  The same with singers choosing microphones.  Many want a 
mic that takes all the flaws out by muting or blending their voice.
In coffee, is one better than the other?  I guess it's just up for grabs, 
and for personal opinion.
Now you have mine for what it's worth.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

3) From:
I wonder if you put a Beano pill into your bags if ther
be no gas in dem beans!
ginny
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4) From: Kevin
Ed,
I'll take it one step further.  I enjoy roasting and brewing up a batch the
next morning and each morning for the remainder of the batch.  This offers
the opportunity to see how the bean not only took to a particular roast, but
also to learn how the taste changes with each successive day of rest.  It's
sort of a cradle to grave approach and allows one to appreciate why one home
roasts with each batch.
-- 
My home coffee roasting blog:http://homecoffeeroastblog.blogspot.com/Kevin

5) From:
Ed and I agree here,
I roasted some Womem's Coop from Tom at 4an this morning and by 5 was sippi=
ng a cafe creama, wonderful. I will roast the beans a bit more the next tim=
e.
ginny
IT ALL GOES BACK TO TASTE...
what ours/yours is on any given day of the year!
---- Ed Needham  wrote: 
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ribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings

6) From: Ed Needham
Have you come to any conclusions with your systematic approach?  It sounds 
like you could really figure out if there's a sweet spot somewhere with your 
method.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

7) From: JanoMac
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this format, some or all of this message may not be legible.
From: "john nanavati" 
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if
this is an indicator of roast quality. <<
I see no correlation with ³quality² of roast and level of outgassing  durin=
g
my modest (still newbie) 1.5 years of hot popper roasting.
Some of the coffee varieties produce almost no noticeable degassing  when I
pop the top of the jar (small, mason/ball-style jars with tight-fitting
lids) after 24-48 hours. Others, like the Columbia Excelso 15336 continue t=
o
hiss at me for many days when I open the jar.
The Columbia Excelso 15336 is without a doubt the gassiest bean I have ever
encountered of the 25-30 varieties I have roasted. I had a large jar of
melange roast (1/3 City, 1/3 FC, 1/3 into rolling 2nd snap) that I had
roasted for use as a blend component and dipped into daily as I experimente=
d
with blends. This batch continued to outgas daily for an entire week. I ran
out of beans in that jar on day 7, otherwise I expect I would still be
getting gas hiss! 
The Ethiopian coffees tend to show the least out-gassing after 24-48 hours.
I think I see that dense beans outgas less than larger, less dense beans.
Kirk


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