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Topic: Moka pot first time user answers to you all + more questions (6 msgs / 264 lines)
1) From: Jeffrey Dobrowski
My moka pot doesn't have that warning.  I do have a grinder.  I have  
a pasquini doserless grinder.  The first time I used the thing I  
tamped it and ground very finely.  Not good.  Nothing came out but  
steam.  Now I am using it and getting better results with no tamp and  
a thicker grind.  Not good results but better.  It still works with  
the blown valve and I sit by it when I use it so I don't think I need  
to worry about an explosion.  I was kinda wondering what the flavor  
profile is here.  I mean some of you say it takes 5 min. and you  
grind it a little finer than for drip coffee.  That sounds like over  
extraction to me, when I consider the grind and extraction time on  
espresso and the grind and extraction time on my french press.  I  
don't like bitter or charcoally (is that a word) coffee.  I like  
sweet well balanced coffee and I like it black so I can't mask  
flavors with milk or sugar.  So what does this thing make?  I bought  
it cuz I have always wondered about them but never wanted to make the  
investment until I saw them on sale for $4.99.  so I bought one of  
the three cup ones.

2) From: Jeffrey Dobrowski
My moka pot doesn't have that warning.  I do have a grinder.  I have  
a pasquini doserless grinder.  The first time I used the thing I  
tamped it and ground very finely.  Not good.  Nothing came out but  
steam.  Now I am using it and getting better results with no tamp and  
a thicker grind.  Not good results but better.  It still works with  
the blown valve and I sit by it when I use it so I don't think I need  
to worry about an explosion.  I was kinda wondering what the flavor  
profile is here.  I mean some of you say it takes 5 min. and you  
grind it a little finer than for drip coffee.  That sounds like over  
extraction to me, when I consider the grind and extraction time on  
espresso and the grind and extraction time on my french press.  I  
don't like bitter or charcoally (is that a word) coffee.  I like  
sweet well balanced coffee and I like it black so I can't mask  
flavors with milk or sugar.  So what does this thing make?  I bought  
it cuz I have always wondered about them but never wanted to make the  
investment until I saw them on sale for $4.99.  so I bought one of  
the three cup ones.

3) From: Brian Kamnetz
Jeffrey,
Like you, I like sweet, well-balanced coffee and I like it black. That's why
I love my moka pot. I agree with you, it does SOUND like it should be
over-extracted, but it does not taste over extracted in my cup. I grind
quite finely with a Zass grain mill. I mound the grounds up just a little in
the moka pot basket, and don't tamp. I put the moka pot together and put it
on my simmer burner, with the flame as big as it can be and still be under
the moka pot, which is about 1/2 way on. It takes about 5-6 mins for the
coffee to start coming out, and I turn the burner down most of the way, so
that the coffee barely seeps out. It takes 5-8 minutes to brew completely.
My moka-pot coffee is sweet and well-balanced, so much so that I don't add
anything to it, including water. I let it cool to nearly room temperature
and sip on a single cup (actually, about 2/3 cup from my 4-tasse moka pot)
for a couple hours. Each sip is very satisfying, and after each sip it is
quite a while before I take the next sip. With bitter coffee, or weak
coffee, I tend to sip more frequently, looking for a satisfying sip of
coffee. Not so with my moka pot coffee.
Brian
On 5/31/07, Jeffrey Dobrowski  wrote:
<Snip>

4) From: Lynne Biziewski
Jeffrey - (butting in here)
Do NOT tamp! You learned the hard way - it only makes it impossible for the
steam to pass thru the coffee.
Another thing I discovered is that there is a HUGE difference in quality
with
moka pots - some are terrific, some are just crap. I got one marked down at
T.J. Max that is terrific. Got another (different brand, but both were made
in
Italy) that I ended up tossing in the garbage. Neither are/were Bialetti (if
I could
afford it - or maybe when I can - I'll order one of the Bialetti's that SM
carries).
The stove makes a big difference, too - just moved back to the very same
apt. I moved OUT of in January (exhausted and very sore right now). I plan
to dust off my moka pot & start using it again - had to put it in storage
because
the other electric stove was so bad I didn't have any control of the
burners.
I don't think that you need to worry about over extracting - the length of
time
brewing it just assures that you don't put it on too high heat, which would
make
the coffee bitter.
(I always use a fine grind, but others prefer a coarser grind.)
Lynne
On 5/31/07, Jeffrey Dobrowski  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"In a world of conflict, the truth must survive."
Kevin Sites, 9/16/2005 blog

5) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-5-724306907
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I went looking last year for a moka pot for my husband--a patient of  
his keeps giving him Cafe Regil and Bustelo, which make passable  
brews only in moka pots. (A shot of anisette in the cup does improve  
things considerably, though it's inappropriate in the morning--unless  
it's not your turn for the carpool).  I wanted to get him a 6-9-tasse  
size so he could make enough in one shot to pour into a travel mug  
and drink during his commute.  Cost Plus World Market had only an  
electric 6-tasse, and it turned out to be a godsend. Fill the bottom  
with water, spoon in the grounds so that they form a dome, put the  
top in, plug it in and hit the switch. No futzing with stoves or  
peeking in to watch the stream. As moka pot coffee goes, it makes the  
best cup I've tasted.
On Jun 3, 2007, at 9:49 AM, Lynne Biziewski wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
--Apple-Mail-5-724306907
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
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	charsetO-8859-1
I went looking last year for a =
moka pot for my husband--a patient of his keeps giving him Cafe Regil =
and Bustelo, which make passable brews only in moka pots. (A shot of =
anisette in the cup does improve things considerably, though it's =
inappropriate in the morning--unless it's not your turn for the =
carpool).  I wanted to get him a 6-9-tasse size so he could make =
enough in one shot to pour into a travel mug and drink during his =
commute.  Cost Plus World Market had only an electric 6-tasse, and it =
turned out to be a godsend. Fill the bottom with water, spoon in the =
grounds so that they form a dome, put the top in, plug it in and hit the =
switch. No futzing with stoves or peeking in to watch the stream. As =
moka pot coffee goes, it makes the best cup I've tasted.
On =
Jun 3, 2007, at 9:49 AM, Lynne Biziewski wrote:
Jeffrey - = (butting in here) Do NOT tamp! You learned the hard way - it only = makes it impossible for the steam to pass thru the = coffee. Another thing I discovered is that there is a HUGE = difference in quality with moka pots - some are terrific, some are = just crap. I got one marked down at T.J. Max that is terrific. Got = another (different brand, but both were made in Italy) that I ended = up tossing in the garbage. Neither are/were Bialetti (if I could = afford it - or maybe when I can - I'll order one of the Bialetti's = that SM carries). The stove makes a big difference, too - just = moved back to the very same apt. I moved OUT of in January (exhausted = and very sore right now). I plan to dust off my moka pot & start = using it again - had to put it in storage because the other electric = stove was so bad I didn't have any control of the burners. I = don't think that you need to worry about over extracting - the length of = time brewing it just assures that you don't put it on too high heat, = which would make the coffee bitter. (I always use a fine = grind, but others prefer a coarser = grind.) Lynne On = 5/31/07, Jeffrey Dobrowski <email4jeff> = wrote: My moka pot doesn't have that warning.  I do have a = grinder.  I have a pasquini doserless grinder.  The first = time I used the thing I tamped it and ground very finely.  Not = good.  Nothing came out but steam.  Now I am using it and = getting better results with no tamp and a thicker grind.  Not = good results but better.  It still works with the blown valve and = I sit by it when I use it so I don't think I need to worry about an = explosion.  I was kinda wondering what the flavor profile is = here.  I mean some of you say it takes 5 min. and you grind it a = little finer than for drip coffee.  That sounds like = over extraction to me, when I consider the grind and extraction time = on espresso and the grind and extraction time on my french press.  = I don't like bitter or charcoally (is that a word) coffee.  I = like sweet well balanced coffee and I like it black so I can't = mask flavors with milk or sugar.  So what does this thing = make?  I bought it cuz I have always wondered about them but = never wanted to make the investment until I saw them on sale for = $4.99.  so I bought one of the three cup = ones. homeroast = mailing list =http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change = your personal list settings (digest options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go = to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings =
-- "In a world = of conflict, the truth must survive." Kevin Sites, 9/16/2005 = blog Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-5-724306907--

6) From: Michael Wascher
Jeffrey,
I finally got good results after a visit to Italy. We visited the town that
my wife's grandfather had come from & I watched her cousin making Moka pot
coffee.
She used the standard Italian roast/grind for espresso (from a tin). Didn't
really tamp, just pushed down a bit with her hand & brushed off the portion
that contacted the rubber seal.
The pot went on the stove over a relatively high heat. But, once the coffee
started to flow the heat was lowered. At the lowest setting of the stove it
was still too hot so the pot was moved to the edge so it was only partially
on the heart.
The idea was to keep the coffee barely flowing out of the little tower in
the center. The lid was kept up, and the pot moved on & off the heat so
that  the slightest stream of coffee came out of the center tower & trickled
down the side.
Drag it out as long as you can while barely maintaining a constant flow.
--MikeW
On 5/31/07, Jeffrey Dobrowski  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"Few people are capable of expressing with equanimity opinions which differ
from the prejudices of their social environment. Most people are even
incapable of forming such opinions." -- Albert Einstein


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