HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Espresso Flavored Soda (4 msgs / 119 lines)
1) From: Joe Screnock
This topic was thrown around a bit last weekend, but there wasn't much 
discussion of "how" to make such a thing.
miKe started the discussion with the following closing statement:
 > Wondering about trying my hand at making a homeroast fresh "espresso
 > soda" using some kind of seltzer or carbonation injection thingy or
 > something!
Aaron had some relevant content when he listed the things that will and 
won't work as carbonated beverages.  (I've never tried Milk, but you 
left out "Grape Juice", which makes a great "Sparkling Grape Juice".)
So, at the risk of reviving a topic that doesn't have much interest, 
I'll call for recipe suggestions for making "Espresso Soda".  Those of 
us who have CO2 setups at home can test out different formulations.  (It 
seems there are at least a couple of us.)
I don't have my notes with me for my Root Beer and Ginger Ale recipes, 
but I seem to recall 2 cups of sugar for 1 gallon of soda.  Scaling that 
down would give us 1/4 cup of sugar in a 16 oz bottle of soda.  ("It 
comes in PINTS!?!")
How much espresso would be a good amount to begin with?  I'm thinking of 
starting with 4 oz.
So, if I have the time this weekend, I'll make up the following:
-  1/4 cup sugar (I'm thinking this a bit shy - I'll look up my other 
recipes first and adjust if necessary)
-  4 oz espresso (probably Costa Rica - La Magnolia)
-  12 oz water
Place into a 20 oz bottle and carbonate to around 20 psi @ 40 degF.
Are there any thoughts / suggestions / corrections?
Joe
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2) From: Larry Johnson
One of the considerations would be the bittering effect of CO2. CO2 adds a
sharp bitterness to whatever it's in. This is very noticeable when comparing
beer which has been force-carbonated under pressure with beer that is
delivered in the fashion of "Real Ale", which is hand-pumped or gravity-fed
from the keg. The Real Ale is smoother and mellower in comparison.
This (the sharp bitterness) is the reason that whipped cream is made with
NO2 (I think) rather than CO2.  Someone mentioned something called a
"Whippit" that I presume was used to make whipped cream and it uses the
nitrous cartridges, according to the original poster. Beverages with a lot
of sugar (i.e. Coke), or beverages that are complimented by the bitterness (
i.e. beer) have no problem with it. I don't know how it would work with
espresso, but I have to believe it would give it an "edge", if you know what
I mean.
On 6/1/07, Joe Screnock  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
Sometimes I get the feeling the whole world is against me, but deep down I
know that's not true. Some smaller countries are neutral.
- Robert Orben

3) From:
Hi Joe:
sounds like a great idea. The only thing close to an espresso soda that I have had is Cokes Blak.
It is surprisingly good.
Si for an espresso soda I would simply make my espresso, add some sugar or not and inject seltzer ( the small amount of salt may add to the taste ) like an good old fashioned cocktail.
Unless you have a capping machine or corks to add right away it will, of course, not last. Maybe making it fresh is a cool idea.
I remember when we were at UCLA we made a batch of home brew...
The basement was too hot and all the caps flew off at some point, the whole place smelled horrid!
ginny
---- Joe Screnock  wrote: 
<Snip>

4) From: Branden Byers
How about using dry ice to carbonate the espresso? Not sure if this is
useful or would even work well, but just saw this Instructable about
carbonating fruit and it made me think of this espresso soda thread...
Check it out:http://www.instructables.com/id/SAA351TF1B3RB5G/Branden
On 6/1/07, Joe Screnock  wrote:
<Snip>


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