HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Book Online: All About Coffee - William H. Ukers (6 msgs / 126 lines)
1) From: Justin Nevins
I found a full text copy of All About Coffee by William H. Ukers (first
edition, I think) online on Google Books. I just thought this might be
useful for someone especially since SM doesn't have it anymore. You can
download a PDF of it or look at it online in their reader. I have a copy on
my laptop, so I can read it when stuck waiting on somebody.http://books.google.com/books?idtXt7aoLNoC&pg379&dq=coffee+roasting&as_brr=1a few pages are hard to read, but most are great.
Justin Nevins

2) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
I found a full text copy of All About Coffee by William H. Ukers 
(first edition, I think) online on Google Books. I just thought this 
might be useful for someone especially since SM doesn't have it 
anymore. You can download a PDF of it or look at it online in their 
reader. I have a copy on my laptop, so I can read it when stuck 
waiting on somebody.http://books.google.com/books?idtXt7aoLNoC&pg379&dq=coffee+roasting&as_brr=1a few pages are hard to read, but most are great.
Justin Nevins
Wow - thats pretty amazing. In a way, its old enough that it SHOULD 
be a public domain book. In fact, I am not sure that SCAA was paying 
any royalty for reprinting it, so maybe it actually is...
Tom
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

3) From:
Justin:
what a guy, thanks. I guess I should look at google books, I had no idea!
ginny
---- Justin Nevins  wrote: 
<Snip>

4) From: Aaron
Tom, I don't know if age has anything to do with something becoming 
public domain. If someone keeps claiming it, or the publisher keeps a 
claim on it, then it's not free domain and I am not sure how long they 
can stretch it out.
I just paid close to a hundred bucks for a reprint of an old refining 
book from C.M. Hoke, copywrited originally in 1940.  Still royalties on 
that to someone I bet!  Either way it would be nice if folks would say, 
oh i made my money on this one, let's turn it public, but I don't see 
that happening too often.  I think the publisher just sits on it, and 
puts it in storage until someone shows enough interest that they can 
sell a reprint from time to time.
Aaron

5) From: Vicki Smith
Here's a good table explaining how copyright and public domain work in 
the US.http://www.copyright.cornell.edu/training/Hirtle_Public_Domain.htmVicki
Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: derbyrm
I would imagine that Google has paid some knowledgeable attorneys to 
research the question.  The opening page of the on-line version states:
This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on 
library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a 
project to make the world's books discoverable online.
It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to 
enter the public domain.
A public domain book is one that was never subject to copyright or whose 
legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may 
vary country to country. Public domain books are our gateways to the past, 
representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often 
difficult to discover.
Roger
derbyrmhttp://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm


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