HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Moths in the beans? (14 msgs / 341 lines)
1) From: Roger Lebow
First of all, my wife is making me write this!
This spring we're doing battle with moths in our cupboards. They've 
infested cereals, grains, and whatever else they can sink their little 
mothy fangs into. This year's infestation seems worse than any before; 
this is also the first spring since I started storing massive (too 
massive, but that's a tale for another time, and I'd guess you've all 
told it yourselves) stores of green coffee beans in the cupboard.
I maintain that green beans, in all their seedy imperviousness, do not 
offer safe harbor to the moth hordes. But my wife wonders if any of you 
have had any experience with lepidopterous beans?
Gratefully,
Roger
Sierra Madre, California

2) From: Barry Luterman
Living in Hawaii my green beans seem rather impervious to everything except 
rodents.

3) From: Randall Nortman
I don't know about moths in coffee, but I know that in general with
moths, your strongest weapon is your freezer.  Freezing temperatures
kill the eggs/larvae.  So cycle all your pantry goods through the
freezer, as much as you can fit at a time, and leave them for at least
12 hours.  Then cycle all your wool and silk clothing and other
textiles (including yarn if you have a knitter in the house) through
the freezer as well.  (Cotton, linen, and synthetics are not as much
of a problem.)  This can take a long time with a small freezer; a
separate freezer chest can make it go much faster.
Getting back to coffee -- my understanding was that caffeine is a
natural pesticide, which is why it evolved in the plants in the first
place.  But I don't have any first-hand knowledge on the subject.

4) From: Sandy Andina
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My exterminator told me a few years ago when we had a grain moth  
infestation that they tend to come from organic and bulk purchases,  
usually from cereals bought in upscale supermarkets like Whole Foods  
or Wild Oats (he said he never saw grain moths in less affluent  
households that tend to shop at Jewel or Dominicks and buy brand-name  
stuff).  He suggested discarding already purchased grains and putting  
all new grains, birdseed, and kibble in plastic containers (or at  
least heavy ziploc bags sealed with tape).  I would think green  
coffee beans are too dense for grain moth larvae to try to eat.
On Jun 5, 2007, at 2:43 PM, Randall Nortman wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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My exterminator told me a few =
years ago when we had a grain moth infestation that they tend to come =
from organic and bulk purchases, usually from cereals bought in upscale =
supermarkets like Whole Foods or Wild Oats (he said he never saw grain =
moths in less affluent households that tend to shop at Jewel or =
Dominicks and buy brand-name stuff).  He suggested discarding already =
purchased grains and putting all new grains, birdseed, and kibble in =
plastic containers (or at least heavy ziploc bags sealed with tape).  =
I would think green coffee beans are too dense for grain moth larvae to =
try to eat.
On Jun 5, 2007, at 2:43 PM, Randall Nortman =
wrote:
I don't know about moths in = coffee, but I know that in general withmoths, = your strongest weapon is your freezer.  Freezing = temperatureskill the eggs/larvae.  So cycle all your pantry = goods through thefreezer, as much as you can fit = at a time, and leave them for at least12 = hours.  Then cycle all = your wool and silk clothing and othertextiles = (including yarn if you have a knitter in the house) throughthe freezer as well.  (Cotton, linen, and = synthetics are not as muchof a = problem.)  This can take = a long time with a small freezer; aseparate = freezer chest can make it go much faster. Getting back = to coffee -- my understanding was that caffeine is anatural pesticide, which is why it evolved in the = plants in the firstplace.  But I don't have any = first-hand knowledge on the subject.homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-32-903410843--

5) From: Ed Needham
Do you store dog biscuits in the cupboard too?  I had a bad problem with 
moths that were hatching from the Feeders Supply bagged dog biscuits.
I've never had a problem with coffee moths.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

6) From: Alchemist John
I have one memory of Tom mentioning an infested bag of beans (IIRC) - 
that went STRAIGHT into the dumpster.  Aside from that, I have never 
heard of moths in coffee.  I have had moths in cocoa, and finally 
eradicated them, but during that time they never had an interest in the coffee.
At 12:18 6/5/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
John Nanci
AlChemist at large
Zen Roasting , Blending & Espresso pulling by Gestalthttp://www.chocolatealchemy.com/

7) From: Dan Mouer
Moths in coffee, not likely. Moths in flour, grains, cereal? You bethcha! 
Wifey has targeted the wrong guy.
Dan M

8) From: Pat Murray
I bought a well used Trosser grinder off Ebay and when I took it apart to
clean it I found it had many dead grain moths up in the grind mechanism and
clinging to the spring.  The grinder appeared to have been retired from use
and not cleaned.  The moths would have been feeding on the remains of the
ground coffee.
Grain moths have become coffee snobs!
On 6/5/07, Roger Lebow  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Brian Kamnetz
Pat,
Were the remains in the Trosser clearly from coffee? I'm wondering whether
the Trosser might have been used to grind something other than coffee. I
bought a coffee mill on eBay that was all gummed up with the remains of
nuts.
Brian
On 6/6/07, Pat Murray  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
We had moths come in on a Zambia coffee once about 6 years ago, in 
ohio.  they were on the bag, the burlap, and we noticed them when we 
unloaded it from the truck that was delivering it. needless to say, 
we didnt even bring it into the shop. since we were sending the 
coffee back to the port anyway, i decided to open it up and see if 
any moths were inside the coffee. they weren't, only on the bag. so i 
imagine moths might like the cloth or jute, but i don't think the 
coffee is food for them, or hospitable for breeding.
<Snip>
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

11) From: Pat Murray
Good point Brian,
There is really no way I can be sure that the grinder did not grind more
than coffee.  It was really funky, I had to use denatured alcohol to
dissolve all the crud.
Pat
On 6/6/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: HarleyNew LoRyder
I really hate to burst your bubble, but yes they can definitely infest coff=
ee beans. I live in Florida where grain moths will infest anything not stor=
ed in a freezer. I bought 77 pounds of columbian coffee. Stored it in the c=
oolest room in the house in original bag. Low and behold within about 2 mon=
ths moths were flying out of the bag of coffee. They have not made webbing =
as I have seen them do in rice, flour and other grain items. 
 
Never had that problem storing greens when I lived in Oregon. Oh well...liv=
e and learn as they say.
<Snip>
ect: +Moths in the beans?> Date: Tue, 5 Jun 2007 12:18:12 -0700> > First of=
 all, my wife is making me write this!> > This spring we're doing battle wi=
th moths in our cupboards. They've > infested cereals, grains, and whatever=
 else they can sink their little > mothy fangs into. This year's infestatio=
n seems worse than any before; > this is also the first spring since I star=
ted storing massive (too > massive, but that's a tale for another time, and=
 I'd guess you've all > told it yourselves) stores of green coffee beans in=
 the cupboard.> > I maintain that green beans, in all their seedy imperviou=
sness, do not > offer safe harbor to the moth hordes. But my wife wonders i=
f any of you > have had any experience with lepidopterous beans?> > Gratefu=
lly,> > Roger> Sierra Madre, California> >=> homeroast mailing list>http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailm=an/listinfo/homeroast> To change your personal list settings (digest option=
s, vacations, unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#=personalsettings
With Windows Live Hotmail, you can personalize your inbox with your favorit=
e color.
www.windowslive-hotmail.com/learnmore/personalize.html?locale=en-us&ocid=
=TXT_TAGLM_HMWL_reten_addcolor_0607=

13) From: Frank Parth
<Snip>
Roger,
I normally get them every year down here in Orange County, CA, but this year I haven't seen very many. I guess theyall 
moved up to Sierra Madre. Some years I have to seal flour, corn meal, and other items in airtight bags to keepthe moths 
out.
What works is a product called Pantry Pest. It's a cardboard triangle with sticky goo on the inside and a 
pheromonereleaser. You can't stop the initial infestation (that comes from outside) but once they're big enough to fly 
it snags thebugs before they can reproduce. I buy it either at a gardening store or at Long's Drugs.
HTH
Frank Parth

14) From: Brian Kamnetz
On 6/7/07, HarleyNew LoRyder  wrote:
<Snip>
What was the original bag made of? I'm assuming plastic, but Tom mentioned
finding moths in the burlap that the coffee was stored in.
Brian


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