HomeRoast Digest


Topic: sort of.. sugar cane (10 msgs / 326 lines)
1) From: Mike Chester
Aaron,
I am not sure about where you live, but the better produce stores around 
here sell sugar cane.  They have it in various lengths.  It is not as sweet 
as you might think.  I have used it cut into skewers for grilling authentic 
Thai sates.
Mike Chester

2) From: Aaron
Thanks folks, Ill have to look in to the local stores.  so far they 
don't seem to have much of it, they have like a little package with 
about a foot stalk in it, vac packed and 'preserved' w hatever that 
means for like $4.99...  a bit steep for something im gonna throw on a 
fire and burn up essentially.
I will have to check in some of the LA stores and areas and see if I can 
get someone to harvey me a bundle or ship a big box or something.  
Florida has some stupid laws though regarding some produce so ill have 
to look in to that as well....
thanks again
Aaron

3) From: miKe mcKoffee
I've gnawed on a sugar cane before, yeah it be sweet. But never used it in a
smoker. FWIW Maui pure cane unprocessed "Sugar in the Raw" will be the
primary sugar provided at PNWG V:-) Plain old processed white sugar will
also be available for those who prefer it.
Pacific Northwest Gathering Vhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGV.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://mdmint.home.comcast.net/coffee/Rosto_mod.htmUltimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
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4) From: Sandy Andina
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On Jun 7, 2007, at 6:26 PM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
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Raw sugar is brownish tan in color and usually not processed further  
after being precipitated out after the liquid is extracted and  
boiled. Sugar sold as "brown sugar" is usually refined sugar to which  
molasses has been added to intensify the flavor.  Some brown sugars,  
like Demerara or "yellow-D" are more minimally processed than plain  
old dark brown sugar--the crystals are bigger and lighter in color  
(and lighter in flavor, too).
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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On Jun 7, 2007, at =
6:26 PM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
I've gnawed on a sugar cane before, yeah it be = sweet. But never used it in asmoker. FWIW = Maui pure cane unprocessed "Sugar in the Raw" will be theprimary sugar provided at PNWG V:-) Plain old = processed white sugar willalso be = available for those who prefer it. Raw = sugar is brownish tan in color and usually not processed further after = being precipitated out after the liquid is extracted and boiled. Sugar = sold as "brown sugar" is usually refined sugar to which molasses has = been added to intensify the flavor.  Some brown sugars, like Demerara = or "yellow-D" are more minimally processed than plain old dark brown = sugar--the crystals are bigger and lighter in color (and lighter in = flavor, too). Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-49--1058237489--

5) From: Brian Kamnetz
Thanks, Sandy.
Brian
On 6/7/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
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6) From: Greg Scace
Has brown sugar always been refined sugar with molasses added, or is 
this a new phenomenom?  If there's such a thing as new style and old 
style brown sugar, are there significant taste differences, and where 
can someone get "old style"?
"Questions, questions, questions, flooding the mind of the concerned 
young person today...."
-Greg (gotta cite Frank Zappa whenever convenient) Scace
At 03:14 PM 6/8/2007, you wrote:
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7) From: Verdova
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
My understanding is that the sugar produces a by-product called =
"molasses" in the initial processing stages, which is termed "sticky =
brown" sugar. After it's been refined into white sugar (molasses =
removed), syrups are re-added to produce "free-flowing brown sugar" in =
some instances. If the sugar is not refined, the natural occurring =
molasses is not removed so that pure natural brown sugar is produced. My =
personal preference is the sticky brown variety.  Here is a brief =
summary of the sugar process:
Extraction
The first stage of processing is the extraction of the cane juice. In =
many factories the cane is crushed in a series of large roller mills: =
similar to a mangle [wringer] which was used to squeeze the water out of =
clean washing a century ago. The sweet juice comes gushing out and the =
cane fiber is carried away for use in the boilers. In other factories a =
diffuser is used as is described for beet sugar manufacture. Either way =
the juice is pretty dirty: the soil from the fields, some small fibers =
and the green extracts from the plant are all mixed in with the sugar.
Evaporation
The factory can clean up the juice quite easily with slaked lime (a =
relative of chalk) which settles out a lot of the dirt so that it can be =
sent back to the fields. Once this is done, the juice is thickened up =
into a syrup by boiling off the water using steam in a process called =
evaporation. Sometimes the syrup is cleaned up again but more often it =
just goes on to the crystal-making step without any more cleaning. The =
evaporation is undertaken in order to improve the energy efficiency of =
the factory.
Boiling
The syrup is placed into a very large pan for boiling, the last stage. =
In the pan even more water is boiled off until conditions are right for =
sugar crystals to grow. In the factory the workers usually have to throw =
in some sugar dust to initiate crystal formation. Once the crystals have =
grown the resulting mixture of crystals and mother liquor is spun in =
centrifuges to separate the two, rather like washing is spin dried. The =
crystals are then given a final dry with hot air before being stored =
ready for dispatch.
Storage
The final raw sugar forms a sticky brown mountain in the store and looks =
rather like the soft brown sugar found in domestic kitchens. It could be =
used like that but usually it gets dirty in storage and has a =
distinctive taste which most people don't want. That is why it is =
refined when it gets to the country where it will be used. Additionally, =
because one cannot get all the sugar out of the juice, there is a sweet =
by-product made: molasses. This is usually turned into a cattle food or =
is sent to a distillery where alcohol is made.
Brown sugars come in many different styles but are essentially one of =
two types: sticky browns and free-flowing browns. The sticky browns were =
originally the sort of mixture that comes out of a cane sugar =
crystallizing pan. In modern refining practice both of these types are =
made by mixing a refined or at least purified sugar with a suitable =
syrup. The color of the sugar and the syrup determines the color of the =
final product and the ratio of syrup to sugar plus any drying applied =
determines whether the product is sticky or free-flowing.
Source:http://www.sucrose.com/lcane.html

8) From: Brett Mason
Consumption
Finally the thick brown swill is tossed aside - because the best coffee is
served pure and black!
Brett
On 6/8/07, Verdova  wrote:
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-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

9) From: Ed Needham
Somewhere in the back of my mind, I remember seeing that sugar must be 
processed to white sugar 'by law' in the US for purity reasons.  Then it can 
have the molasses added back in.
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

10) From: Justin Marquez
If that's the case, I wonder how they get past it for the blonde turbinado
("Sugar in The Raw") sugar.
On 6/11/07, Ed Needham  wrote:
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-- 
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)


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