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Topic: Odd but true (13 msgs / 353 lines)
1) From: Aaron
I have 5 coffee plants growing outside in different pots each.
a few get lots of sun, a few get a bit more shade.
anyways... I water them and fertilize them regularly, I use my own 
blends for fertilizer and they are doing quite well.
The odd thing is,  I also do a lot of cooking, I have a big ole smoker 
and I frequently use hickory / mesquite to smoke my meats in.   As part 
of my process, I take the wood chunks and soak them in a bucket of water 
for about an hour or two before throwing them on the coals.
The one coffee plant, I have been watering using this water from the 
wood soakings... I figured why not, ill try it to see if i can use it, 
and not just waste it,  and it's generally brown from the wood 
'squeezins' when I do dump it in .   I figured id just do one plant that 
way if it shocks it or is not working, I didn't kill a bunch of them.  
the others get watered the same as always.
After a few months, the one that I have been giving the wood soaked 
water to is growing like crazy,... the others are doing well too mind 
you but this one is really growing stupid like....  that's a good thing!!
I just wonder what's in hickory / mesquite to make it want to grow so much.
Aaron

2) From: Justin Marquez
It's trying to get away from that funky-smellin' water!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 6/12/07, Aaron  wrote:
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3) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
I would like to know why, too. I have around 80 coffee plants! I know 
wood in soil mixes depletes nitrogen, but i cant imagine the effect 
of water that had wood soaking in it. would that extract nutrient 
from the wood?
tom
I have 5 coffee plants growing outside in different pots each.
a few get lots of sun, a few get a bit more shade.
anyways... I water them and fertilize them regularly, I use my own
blends for fertilizer and they are doing quite well.
The odd thing is,  I also do a lot of cooking, I have a big ole smoker
and I frequently use hickory / mesquite to smoke my meats in.   As part
of my process, I take the wood chunks and soak them in a bucket of water
for about an hour or two before throwing them on the coals.
The one coffee plant, I have been watering using this water from the
wood soakings... I figured why not, ill try it to see if i can use it,
and not just waste it,  and it's generally brown from the wood
'squeezins' when I do dump it in .   I figured id just do one plant that
way if it shocks it or is not working, I didn't kill a bunch of them.
the others get watered the same as always.
After a few months, the one that I have been giving the wood soaked
water to is growing like crazy,... the others are doing well too mind
you but this one is really growing stupid like....  that's a good thing!!
I just wonder what's in hickory / mesquite to make it want to grow so much.
Aaron

4) From:
I will have to go back through my files but there was aa fellow that soaked wood and added it to his plants and they really did well, like using bat poop.
ginny
---- Aaron  wrote: 
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5) From: Beth Henkels
I wood bet (pun intended) that the chips do give off nutrients.  Gardeners
(myself included), often use "compost tea"; an infusion of compost left to
soak in water and then that water used for plants.  It could be possible
that the wood chips are just acting like compost in its earliest stage.
That's my two cents anyway
Beth

6) From: Zane Goff
I agree with Beth, but i wouldn't add chips to the soil or let them soak to long.
  sometimes the decomposing bacteria take nutrients out of the soil as they eat the wood.
   
  So i've tried sprouting the odd bean but it always goes moldy.  Are regular coffee beans
  too processed to sprout?  how did you guys get your plants?
  Any cherries yet?
  zane
  
From: "Beth Henkels" 
To: 
Subject: RE: +Odd but true
Date: Tue, 12 Jun 2007 17:43:37 -0500
I wood bet (pun intended) that the chips do give off nutrients. Gardeners
(myself included), often use "compost tea"; an infusion of compost left to
soak in water and then that water used for plants. It could be possible
that the wood chips are just acting like compost in its earliest stage.
That's my two cents anyway
Beth

7) From: George Birchard
Maybe it likes the extra water.
Then again hickory has nitrogen fixers unlike may trees. It may provide 
some nutrients and some acidity.
Aaron wrote:
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8) From: Kris McN
Aaron,
My guess is George is right and the leech water is dropping the pH a bit.  I
seem to recall that coffee plants prefer neutral to slightly acidic soils.
Kris McN

9) From: Beth Henkels
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Kris McN wrote:
My guess is George is right and the leech water is dropping the pH a bit.  I
seem to recall that coffee plants prefer neutral to slightly acidic soils.  
Which also makes sense, because I sometimes sprinkle wet coffee grounds
around my acid loving plants.  How's that for the circle of life!! :-)
Beth  

10) From:
Most likely true on that score. My plants used to get a 6 to 6.5 water since theey likeda bit more acid soil.
get out your ph meter and see what the bucket of soaked bark is compared to your city water, if you use city water that is.
I had well water which was pretty good.
ginny
---- Beth Henkels  wrote: 
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11) From: Aaron
hows that for the circle of life... wow that almost classifies as 
cannibalism....   long pork anyone :)
Aaron

12) From: Elliott H. O'Reilly
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
I don't have a list of any kind around but some trees have allopathic
properties meaning that they can leech chemicals into the soil that have
fungicidal and/or herbicidal properties.  Apple and Walnut are both trees
that have some allopathic properties.  Apparently in Sumatra paper companies
have brought in alien acacia from Australia because of its fiber.  The
acacia however is highly allopathic and is very fast growing, uses much
water, kills off competing and native plants, and is highly invasive
spreading by seed.  I read that it was called a pulp tsunami because of it's
effect on the landscape as it is spreading.  I don't know enough about the
acacia to know whether it could effect coffee growing in Sumatra or whether
it is confined more to the lower areas.  As for watering plants, wood that
has herbicidal properties would most likely leech at least some of the
chemical into the water in which it is being soaked and therefore have at
least some undesirable effect on the watered plants.
Elliott

13) From:
well said elliott,
---- "Elliott H. O'Reilly"  wrote: 
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