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Topic: Odd but true-wood chip water (4 msgs / 128 lines)
1) From: Jim Whitesell
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As a chemist who was instrumental in saving what is left of the  
treaty oak in Austin, Tx, I would say that there is not a significant  
amount of nutrients in the dead part of a tree to make a difference.  
On the other hand, most tree growth is limited by water---they grow  
great evergreens in northern Findland for some of the best paper made  
in the world. Those of you who have traveled the US, think, where are  
the grandest and tallest trees? Pacific North West and the North  
East. I would guess that you are giving the special tree more water  
than the others.
For those who do not know the story of the treaty oak:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_Oak_%28Austin%2C_Texas%29Replacing the soil was a no-brainer. It was my idea to continually  
mist the roots of the tree with spring water, which in central Texas  
is essentially saturated with calcium. The herbicide is more soluble  
in water containing calcium and we knew that there was already enough  
herbicide in the tree to kill it. We had to get it out so we had the  
tree transport it to the leaves, which died, fell off, and where  
replaced by two more growths which also died. That was enough to  
clean about 1/3 of the tree enough to live through the summer and  
next winter to leaf out the next spring.
Jim Whitesell
UCSD
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As a chemist who was =
instrumental in saving what is left of the treaty oak in Austin, Tx, I =
would say that there is not a significant amount of nutrients in the =
dead part of a tree to make a difference. On the other hand, most tree =
growth is limited by water---they grow great evergreens in northern =
Findland for some of the best paper made in the world. Those of you who =
have traveled the US, think, where are the grandest and tallest trees? =
Pacific North West and the North East. I would guess that you are giving =
the special tree more water than the others.

For those who do = not know the story of the treaty oak:
htt= p://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Treaty_Oak_%28Austin%2C_Texas%29<= br class="webkit-block-placeholder">Replacing the soil was = a no-brainer. It was my idea to continually mist the roots of the tree = with spring water, which in central Texas is essentially saturated with = calcium. The herbicide is more soluble in water containing calcium and = we knew that there was already enough herbicide in the tree to kill it. = We had to get it out so we had the tree transport it to the leaves, = which died, fell off, and where replaced by two more growths which also = died. That was enough to clean about 1/3 of the tree enough to live = through the summer and next winter to leaf out the next = spring.

Jim Whitesell

UCSD

= --Apple-Mail-5--618284618--

2) From: Aaron
Im watering them the same actually.   They all are in pots, and I dump 
the water in until it fills the top about an inch or so of water and it 
runs through and out the holes in the bottom for a good saturation.  
This one doesn't get watered more really, just when I water them, which 
with the heat we've been having lately is almost daily, if I have smoker 
water, in it goes, if not then it gets regular water like the other ones do.
Maybe the sap??? in there does something to make the water more clingy 
or helps it hang in the dirt longer or something,  I don't know.  Ok, I 
tasted the water, (yah I know probably not the smartest thing to do) and 
it did taste ahh.. woody?  maybe some nutrients or something is being 
leeched out, or some sugars.
Whatever it is, the plant seems to love it.
Aaron

3) From: Rich
The wood is probably providing tanic acid which lowers the Ph.
On Wed, 13 Jun 2007 06:25:02 -0400, Aaron wrote:
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4) From:
on another note,
one a month, leach your pots, put a couple of boards or screen over a five gallon container, set the pot on top and run water through the plant until that 5 gal bucket fills,
this takes out buildup of stuff in the soil...
you can just drip into the pot with a hose until the 5 gal bucket fills up, do it slowly.
g
---- Rich  wrote: 
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