HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Enough left? (3 msgs / 144 lines)
1) From: David Morgenlender
Terroir is George Howell's company.  They're in Acton, MA.
Whole Foods is a grocery chain, selling "healthy foods", sort of a cross =
between
supermarkets & health food stores.  They used to be called "Bread & =
Circus".
The Terroir website may say where their beans are sold.  I've seen some =
messages
implying people have bought greens while visiting Terroir.  But I haven't=
 seen
any mention of this on their website.  I've just bought roasted beans.  =
BTW,
their typical bag is 12 oz.
Dave
On Mon, 02 Jul 2007 19:49:54 -0700, you wrote:
<Snip>
already roasted? (I will do a google) Also I am not sure what "Whole =
Foods" is? Is it some type of store (I assume)? There is not one around =
here. Anyway, I roasted two more batches of the Harar this evening. I =
still have maybe one and a half batches left (1/2 to 2/3 cup of greens =
left) and a couple of batches of the Panama left, so it will get me close=
 to the weekend, Maybe Monday or Tuesday. Hopefully, by then my order =
should be on its way or maybe even here.
<Snip>
 any looking before as I just started this amazing/wonderful "hobby" of =
roasting, grinding and brewing my own greens (two to three months ago). =
It is quite a step up from old-brewed folgers (or whatever was on sale at=
 the time at the store) and *$. I will never go back.
<Snip>
go to maybe 7 or 8 pounds one of these days, but I really don't want to =
go much higher than that. I enjoy getting in and trying new greens every =
month or so. I don't think that I would like to stash 1 to 2 hundred=
 pounds of greens, just because of that, although, if I did, I don't =
guess I would be sweating running out now, would I?
<Snip>
unsvbscribes) go to =http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings==========================
==========================
=====
Dave Morgenlender
e-mail: dmorgen
==========================
==========================
=====

2) From: Rick Copple
Frank Awbrey wrote:
<Snip>
It is always a balancing act. I probably over did it previously, and 
still have beans in my stash that are at least a year-and-a-half old. As 
a matter of fact, I roasted last week the last pound of some Brazilian 
Yellow Bourbon beans. (Drinking a cup as I type, actually). And it still 
taste pretty darn good. Guess my storage spot is ideal.
Anyway, the main reason you might find to stock up on a certain bean is 
if you really like it. I think most of us have a particular bean or two 
that we just want to make sure we always have a good supply on hand of. 
Since any particular bean is seasonal, and once it is gone you probably 
won't see it again until at least a year later, if you have a favorite 
it is nice to stock up around a year's supply on it, if you can afford it.
A couple of Christmases ago, I found a bean I really liked. My Christmas 
present was a 20# bag of it. Probably more than I needed. A year and a 
half later, I still have around 7-8 pounds of it. That's despite giving 
away some of it, and using it to caffinate church socials on a fairly 
regular basis.
I use to have a pretty sizable stash (though not as big as Les's) but 
now is down to the under 20# area, I believe (though it has been a while 
since I actually counted it). But, the nice thing about it is, when I 
didn't have the money for more coffee, I had no fears of running out for 
many months. :) I could still go for quite a while on what I have left, 
and because I do have so many older beans, I am trying to use them up 
before they become some musty aged coffee (unless I get lucky and one of 
the aged coffees actually taste good, but that's another year and a half 
before I get there).
And, in case it hasn't been mentioned in a while, generally a year is 
about the recommended time to store greens. So most of my coffee is over 
that, but so far it still all taste good when I brew it, so I keep 
drinkin'. :)
-- 
Rick Copple

3) From: Jim Carter
Economic factors also play a part here. Specifically, I am referring to 
the concepts of Economies of Scale, Inventory Order Point, and Economic 
Order Quantity. I'm not an economist, but I've seen one on TV. Economies 
of Scale: the price goes down as the volume purchased goes up. Inventory 
Order Point: the point at which you should re-order to avoid running 
out. Economic Order Quantity: the amount you should order to take 
advantage of Economies of Scale without carrying too much inventory.
With SM as your supplier, this is pretty easy to manage.  You don't need 
to make a big investment in green coffee to significantly lower your 
costs. Consider doubling your order size (12 pounds rather than 6) and 
order half as often.  Order a two-month supply every other month. This 
will save you quite a bit on shipping costs and probably a fair amount 
on bean costs (depending on how you split the 12 #'s up).  You could get 
a 2# bag of six different beans for some nice variety over the two month 
period. I often order two 5# bags and a 2# bag, which further lowers my 
bean costs. The USPS Flat Rate Box shipping option (for up to 12# green 
coffee only) is significantly less expensive than UPS (unless you are on 
the West Coast).  If you order every two months, you won't miss many 
opportunities to pick up the latest "hot" bean before supplies are gone. 
Plus, you have the bonus advantage of hearing what others on the list 
think about the new stuff.
Do a simple math exercise to determine what would happen if you applied 
this to your situation. Create a mock order of how you would fill a 12# 
box using the USPS Flat Rate Box shipping option ($9.35 IIRC?) and 
divide by 12 to get your true cost per pound. Next, create two orders of 
6#'s each with the shipping option of your choice.  Add the cost of 
those two smaller orders and again divide by 12 to get your true cost 
per pound. You don't have to order 20# bags to save money. You can 
achieve good results by minimizing your shipping expense (on a 
cost/pound basis).
I hope this helps.
-- JC
Rick Copple wrote:
<Snip>


HomeRoast Digest