HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Let's hear it for the 12-hour rest (11 msgs / 309 lines)
1) From: Randall Nortman
I've noticed a tendancy for folks to advocate long rest periods rather
than tasting soon after roasting.  I've been keeping a roasting and
tasting log for a couple of months now, and I've just been looking
back over it.  I have a policy of first tasting each roast between 8
and 24 hours after roasting.  Looking back over my log entries, in
pretty much every case the tasting notes from the first day are the
longest and most interesting entries.  It clearly seems that you get
the most complex range of tastes when the coffee is young, and then as
it ages it mellows out and settles into a narrower range of flavors,
and within that narrower range the coffee -- at least the good ones,
properly roasted -- will blossom and fill out nicely, and get a little
more rounded around the edges.
Now, I'm not saying that all the first-day flavors are good.  My
first-day entries are speckled with descriptions like "locker room
fragrance", "sweaty socks", "stings the back of the throat", "heavy,
tea-like astringency", "like sucking on an orange peel", "cough
syrup", "sour tang", "thin body" etc.  But there are also things like
"savory, buttery finish", "extreme sweetness", "floral and complex",
"spicy", "wild fruity brightness", and those are the things I'm really
looking for.  A lot of those flavors -- both good and bad -- disappear
after 24 hours.
All I'm saying is that if you're not sampling your coffee within the
first 24 hours, you're missing out on some fun.  Sure, it might be
"better" overall after a few days' rest, but it's just so interesting
on that first day, I can't imagine wanting to miss that.  Sweaty socks
and all.  I also like to let some roasts rest quite a bit after that
first day, but I do continue to sample them now and then so that I can
really figure out when they hit their peak.

2) From: Brandon Kolbe
Hi Randall,
   You know, I have to agree with you on this one.  I had roasted some Peru
Norte Especiale a few weeks ago.  It had been resting about 6-8 hrs.  I
brewed some up in my Aeropress and it was fabulous!  There were flavors that
I was not able to detect after the coffee had rested for another day or so.
It is definitely interesting to try each coffee as it ages.  The change in
the flavor profile is amazing.
Happy Roasting,
Brandon
On 7/7/07, Randall Nortman  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"We are what we think.
All that we are arises
With our thoughts.
With our thoughts,
We make our world."
       -- Buddha

3) From: Randall Nortman
On Sat, Jul 07, 2007 at 02:29:52PM -0500, Kevin Creason wrote:
<Snip>
I use an Aeropress, which is in some ways a combination of all three
methods.  In the end, what it produces is most similar to
paper-filtered drip coffee, though you have a lot of control over
variables like brewing temperature, grind fineness, brewing time, etc,
so the results can really be very different than normal drip brewing.
And if you want something more like french press, you can use
polyester filters and the inverted pressing technique to get more oils
in the cup.  And you can make it as strong as you like, even stronger
than a typical espresso.  (But even when brewed strong, it's not
really espresso, just really strong coffee.)
I'm no expert, but I think that if you're brewing espresso, it is not
likely to be very good until the coffee has rested a couple of days at
least.  That's the common wisdom, anyway, but I don't have an espresso
setup yet myself.  But it makes sense to me that the various "flaws" I
taste in coffee brewed with young beans would be overwhelming in
espresso.  Sweaty socks times 10!  It would be hard to taste the good
stuff under all that.

4) From: Scott Petersen
Randall Nortman wrote:
<Snip>
I have always thought I was a little weird in this respect. I have 
always tried my coffee within about 15 hours. In all cases but one I 
have found the most flavours and an equally enjoyable cup to the same 
coffee rested 3-5 days. The only exception I have found to this is the 
Brazil Daterra Farms - Yellow Bourbon roasted to City+. I found that one 
to be acrid and ashy until the 5th day.
This is brewing with an AeroPress.
Cheers
Scott Petersen

5) From: Les
I always brew a pot of what ever I roast the next day.  There are a lot
special cups of coffee that I have discovered that way.  If it isn't good
the first day, it has no chance of developing into a great coffee with rest.
Les
On 7/7/07, Scott Petersen  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From:
Randall:
I test all of my roast asap. Some a press but most (90%) as espresso and it is amazing what I find for single origin espresso's.
Some are garbage but most make a very interesting cup.
Thanks for your comments on the joy's of the "test right away" approach to the fresh roasted bean.
ginny
---- Randall Nortman  wrote: 
<Snip>

7) From: Aaron
I must say, most coffee's taste better after at least a day rest,  
sometimes close to a week or so rest for some like kona's... however on 
more than one occasion I have brewed shorter than a day rest.   The 
coffee was still very very good, just got better with the resting.  I 
think my earliest resting batch was like 30 seconds after roasting.  I 
totally ran out of beans, cooked up some real fast, and while the I 
roast was in the cool down cycle, i had the water heating up,  by the 
time the I roast kicked off I dumped ;the beans, pulled 10.5 grams out, 
ground them and threw right into the swiss gold for my morning coffee.   
Aint gonna git no fresher then that!!
Aaron

8) From: Lynne Biziewski
I'm way too impatient - and not a planner, by any means.
Which means I never think of roasting til the last minute - so, not only do
I start drinking them
the next day, but I usually can't resist trying a cup immediately.
Find some too bright immediately after I roast - but most times they are
good.
My organizational talents leave much to be desired - so I haven't kept
notes.
Trying to work on that...
Lynne
(in short, drink it later, drink it now - if it's homeroast it's gonna be
better!)
On 7/7/07, Aaron  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: raymanowen
"...*the 12-hour rest*"
This phenomenon has value in that it fills the gap between Immediate Post
Roast cupping with later brews.
I am unable to roast coffee, then just sit and watch it. I must experience
what is happening to the flavor and aroma. Otherwise, how would I know for
certain that "the flavor develops after X time period?"
I really know nothing about and have no experience with espresso brewing, so
it would make the worst possible brewing standard for me.
My philosophy is that I am buying (well- Pretty Soon!) beans that have
already been cupped and judged to be the Acme of the available coffee
harvest. My goal is not to pretend to find faults, but to accentuate the
excellence of the beans.
EGAD- It's ludicrous on its face to find fault with materials judged
excellent by an acknowledged expert!
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

10) From: Brett Mason
Two Cents...
  Roast a larger quantity
  Then
    taste at 10 minutes
      at 12 hours
      at 36 hours
        nd whenever else you like...
And take notes...
It's OK toroast more than 1/4 cup at a time... You are not a Sampler...
 Brett
On 7/8/07, raymanowen  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Cheers,
Bretthttp://homeroast.freeservers.com

11) From: Sandy Andina
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I roasted some more Brazil Jacu Bird this morning (City+) and will be  
drinking it at my hotel tomorrow before I head back to Chicago (am in  
Madison, where I had a rehearsal during the day and co-hosted an open  
mic tonight--same drill next week if any of you are in the area).  
Haven't decided whether to use the hotel's auto-drip with my  
Swissgold basket, the hotel's auto-drip to heat the water for the  
initial Aeropress brewing and my mini-Ibis to boil the water to  
dilute it, or just use the mini-Ibis and Aeropress. (Whichever way I  
do it, I will grind in the Zass Turkish--but it'd take as much coffee  
to make one Aeropress mug as half a pot of drip).
On Jul 7, 2007, at 3:07 PM, Randall Nortman wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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I roasted some more Brazil Jacu =
Bird this morning (City+) and will be drinking it at my hotel tomorrow =
before I head back to Chicago (am in Madison, where I had a rehearsal =
during the day and co-hosted an open mic tonight--same drill next week =
if any of you are in the area). Haven't decided whether to use the =
hotel's auto-drip with my Swissgold basket, the hotel's auto-drip to =
heat the water for the initial Aeropress brewing and my mini-Ibis to =
boil the water to dilute it, or just use the mini-Ibis and Aeropress. =
(Whichever way I do it, I will grind in the Zass Turkish--but it'd take =
as much coffee to make one Aeropress mug as half a pot of =
drip).
On Jul 7, 2007, at 3:07 PM, Randall Nortman =
wrote:
On Sat, Jul 07, 2007 at = 02:29:52PM -0500, Kevin Creason wrote: That's interesting to me, I = appreciate the insight.How are you = preparing your coffee-- press, drip, or espresso? = I use an = Aeropress, which is in some ways a combination of all threemethods.  = In the end, what it produces is most similar topaper-filtered drip coffee, though you have a lot of = control overvariables like brewing = temperature, grind fineness, brewing time, etc,so the results can really be very different than = normal drip brewing. Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-3--591939577--


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