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Topic: Longer term green bean storage - how do I avoid "baggy?" (7 msgs / 207 lines)
1) From: Guy J. Borgen
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Hello all - wondering if those having had success with longer term storage =
of green beans could share their method w/ me. I have ~ 5 pounds of Harar H=
orse lot 30, still in Tom's burlap bag. Recently picked up 20 lb of the Ken=
ya AA Murang'a - Kariani (Blackberry, thanks Tom!) and hope to store this s=
o it holds up over time.  Thanks in advance for your help...
Guy=
 Borgen
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Hello all - wondering if those having had success with longer term storage =
of green beans could share their method w/ me. I have ~ 5 pounds of Harar H=
orse lot 30, still in Tom's burlap bag. Recently picked up 20 lb of the Ken=
ya AA Murang'a - Kariani (Blackberry, thanks Tom!) and hope to store this s=
o it holds up over time.  Thanks in advance for your help...
Guy Borgen
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2) From: raymanowen
I must be special, but my opinion of the burlap bags is that they should all
be sent to Siberia! What makes you think anyone has had success with longer
term storage of green beans? If you have read it, were the people
warehousing their beans silent about their methods?
The burlap bags allow for massive changes in environmental humidity once the
beans are trucked inland from the port warehouse. When the beans are afloat
in ocean transit, even starting with the beans being processed in their
origin country, humidity is high.
Sealed plastic bags maintain the moisture level regardless of desert
transit. Tucson used to have 2% humidity, according to one of my uncles back
in the day. I don't think the long term survival of green coffee in burlap
sacks in AZ is very great. Not my problem.
While the burlap is a green light to the passage of moisture in either
direction, others have had success using sealed bags and partial vacuum to
stabilize the environment. The moisture stabilization seems to be the prime
objective. A real laboratory vacuum pump would strip out all the moisture,
so they have to be using relative toy pumps.
A Sargent-Welch laboratory vacuum pump I traded for some repairs I was doing
had a 1.5hp motor and weighed nearly 50lbs. The Balzers pump on a cryogenic
vacuum chamber had a 5hp motor and weighed well over 100lbs. To shorten the
rough evacuation time, my client installed a really outsized new pump and
offered me the Balzers.
I have a 240v delta rotary phase inverter cobbled up in my erstwhile
Roasting shed. This pack rat ain't too swift- I turned down a 4 group
espresso maker while I was pretty sure I disliked espresso.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
On 7/8/07, Guy J. Borgen  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976

3) From: conradarms
Hi,? I store my green beans in burlap bags, Tom's cotton bags, and lunch paper bags.? I have had some beans for over a year and they are still Great.? Also, keep them away from heat and light.? Enjoy..................Dorothy

4) From: Eddie Dove
Guy,
Be sure to go to the Sweet Maria's website, scroll to the bottom of
the page and in the search box type "green bean storage" and click
"Find!"  Read the first five articles that come up.  Items 1-4 will be
about green beans and item 5 is about roasted coffee storage.
Personally, I like to vacuum seal the green beans with a Foodsaver in
plastic bags for longer-term storage and vacuum seal roasted coffee in
mason jars with the same foodsaver.  It works for me, but others
employ other various methods.
Hope this helps ...
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 7/8/07, Guy J. Borgen  wrote:
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5) From: Larry English
In particular, the article "Storing Your Green Coffee" is to the point.  My
storage is in the cloth 2-lb bags with the Sweet Maria's logo - paid the
$0.35 per to have the beans shipped in them, until I'd acquired so many that
I now just reuse them.  The beans reside in my wine closet, where the temp
varies between 60F and 65F seasonally (but stable day-to-day) and humidity
is right around 50%.  I'm roasting year-old beans right now and they are
excellent - though of course it is hard to know whether they are
significantly less excellent than they would have been if used earlier.
Year-old means a year from Tom's "arrival date" per the website.
Larry
On 7/8/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
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6) From: John Brown
Tucson has on average single digit humidity or low two digit.  but we do 
have summer monsoons.
raymanowen wrote:
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7) From: Steven Dover
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Glass jars/gallon jugs etc...recommended to me by a 7th generation =
coffee grower from Guatemala. I've been storing my green and roasted =
coffee this way for 12+ years now without any problems whatsoever. Ftr, =
I have tried other methods but the fresh harvested taste keeps longer in =
glass. If I had a milling machine I'd inquire about buying in parchment =
{the way it's stored "in country" until shipped "out of country"}.
Steven D.


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