HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Storing the Green Beanies (18 msgs / 576 lines)
1) From: Gail Shuford
Can anyone tell me what most home roasters prefer to use to store  
their green beans in?  (unbleached muslin bags, burlap, or?) I've  
heard that burlap is best and would like to make some of my own but  
cannot find any of the special burlap that is supp to be safer for  
food storage.  What would be the problem with using regular  
unbleached burlap from a fabric store?  I am guessing that the  
chemicals used in the processing treatment would leech into the  
beans?  Somehow I cant envsion this happening with a hard coffee bean  
especially for 6 mos to a year of storage.  If it is true, then how  
harmful could it be?  I could find no information about this online  
so thought maybe someone in the SM coffee loop might know.   Also  
there is the burlap odor to deal with.  It seems like burlap is  
always going to smell "burlapy"...I have some that I have aired out  
for weeks that still has a strong burlap odor to it.  Any suggestions  
would be appreciated. (I know I can order online from SM's and I  
already have done that but I am going to need alot more so I thought  
about making some of my own.  It is not that hard to sew a straight  
stitch if one has a sewing machine).
Thanks,
Gail

2) From: Ian Gowen
I store my greens in the plastic ziplock bags they come in.
-Ian
On 7/10/07, Gail Shuford  wrote:
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-- 
Ian Gowen ::http://ian.gowen.cc

3) From: Sandy Andina
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Ashamed to admit that though I've bought the cotton muslin bags, I've  
mostly just been using the ziplocs in which SM's sells the beans.  
Haven't had anything go baggy or get invaded by moths yet.
On Jul 10, 2007, at 3:40 PM, Gail Shuford wrote:
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Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Ashamed to admit that though =
I've bought the cotton muslin bags, I've mostly just been using the =
ziplocs in which SM's sells the beans. Haven't had anything go baggy or =
get invaded by moths yet.On Jul 10, 2007, at 3:40 =
PM, Gail Shuford wrote:
Can anyone tell me what most home roasters prefer to = use to store their green beans in? = (unbleached muslin bags, burlap, or?) I've heard that burlap is = best and would like to make some of my own but cannot find any of the = special burlap that is supp to be safer for food storage.  What would be the problem = with using regular unbleached burlap from a fabric store?  I am guessing that the = chemicals used in the processing treatment would leech into the = beans?  Somehow I cant = envsion this happening with a hard coffee bean especially for 6 mos to a = year of storage.  If it = is true, then how harmful could it be?  I could find no information = about this online so thought maybe someone in the SM coffee loop might = know.   Also there is the = burlap odor to deal with.  = It seems like burlap is always going to smell "burlapy"...I have = some that I have aired out for weeks that still has a strong burlap odor = to it.  Any suggestions = would be appreciated. (I know I can order online from SM's and I already = have done that but I am going to need alot more so I thought about = making some of my own.  = It is not that hard to sew a straight stitch if one has a sewing = machine).Thanks,homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-19--364787477--

4) From: Stephanie Baker
I keep mine in the paper bags that the local place I usually get  
beans from puts them in.
I admit I've so far only bought one bag containers though and have  
never had anything for over two months.
Stephanie Baker
On Jul 10, 2007, at 1:40 PM, Gail Shuford wrote:
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5) From:
I store mine in the cotton bags from SM's. I peel the label off the bag they come in & fold it over around the string so I can keep track of what's what. If u want the true burlap, u can buy the used burlap bags from SM's for about $2. they are big enough to put a small person in.I think as long as you don't have the beans for a LONG time, anything will do. I don't think you'd have to worry about germs a lot due to high roasting temps.  I think it's more about keeping the humidity right.  Just my theories, though.
---- Gail Shuford  wrote: 
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6) From: Gail Shuford
I would do the same if I used them all up within about 3 mos but I am  
preparing to store for longer periods of time.
Gail
On Jul 10, 2007, at 12:51 PM, Ian Gowen wrote:
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7) From: Gail Shuford
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I guess the issue now is "time" how long have you act uall y kept  
them in the plastic ziplocs...I would guess prob not that long.  I am  
gearing up for longer storage.
Thanks,
Gail
On Jul 10, 2007, at 12:54 PM, Sandy Andina wrote:
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I guess the issue now is "time" =
how long have you act uall y kept them in the plastic ziplocs...I would =
guess prob not that long.  I am gearing up for longer =
storage.Thanks,Gail
On Jul 10, 2007, at =
12:54 PM, Sandy Andina wrote:
Ashamed to = admit that though I've bought the cotton muslin bags, I've mostly just = been using the ziplocs in which SM's sells the beans. Haven't had = anything go baggy or get invaded by moths yet.On Jul = 10, 2007, at 3:40 PM, Gail Shuford wrote:
Can anyone tell me what most home roasters prefer to = use to store their green beans in? = (unbleached muslin bags, burlap, or?) I've heard that burlap is = best and would like to make some of my own but cannot find any of the = special burlap that is supp to be safer for food storage.  What would be the problem = with using regular unbleached burlap from a fabric store?  I am guessing that the = chemicals used in the processing treatment would leech into the = beans?  Somehow I cant = envsion this happening with a hard coffee bean especially for 6 mos to a = year of storage.  If it = is true, then how harmful could it be?  I could find no information = about this online so thought maybe someone in the SM coffee loop might = know.   Also there is the = burlap odor to deal with.  = It seems like burlap is always going to smell "burlapy"...I have = some that I have aired out for weeks that still has a strong burlap odor = to it.  Any suggestions = would be appreciated. (I know I can order online from SM's and I already = have done that but I am going to need alot more so I thought about = making some of my own.  = It is not that hard to sew a straight stitch if one has a sewing = machine).Thanks,homeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-1--350520116--

8) From: Gail Shuford
I think you are on track with your theory.  After giving this subject  
probably way too much thought, and reading several comments, I have  
come to the same conclusion that controlling high humidity must have  
been the driving force behind the burlap preference for c. bean  
storage.  It probably dates back to when cargo ships could take  
months to cross major oceans.  I can see where with the beans might  
be affected by the ocean humidity and salt air under those conditions  
as well as extreme heat.  Of course seaport towns would have high  
humidity as well except for maybe Oakland and Pac NW.   Further add  
the fact that the use of plastic for containment wasnt even in use  
until more recently, and you have some die-hard legends i.e. the  
burlap.  Also the major players in the coffee bean business probably  
use what they have used for centuries and is more readily available  
there.  Small bags of dried beans and peas are packaged in plastic (I  
have not a clue as to what they use for the giant shipping bags for  
these) and last for years so why not coffee beans...I wanted to order  
the SMs big burlap bag but I couldnt do it and use flat rate  
shipping, so I decided to purchase my burlap locally.  It is rather  
nostalgic and rustic in my opinion but a challenge to sew because it  
ravels like crazy!
Gail
On Jul 10, 2007, at 4:05 PM, thirddayhomeroaster wrote:
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9) From: Eddie Dove
Hey Gail,
Some of us use a Foodsaver and vacuum seal the greens in the plastic bags.
Hope this helps,
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 7/10/07, Gail Shuford  wrote:
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10) From: Gail Shuford
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What is the longest you have stored this way?  And there goes the  
"beans must breath theory".   But other than that, if bean breathing  
is not a problem, I like this one best!
Gail
On Jul 10, 2007, at 5:00 PM, Eddie Dove wrote:
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What is the longest you have =
stored this way?  And there goes the "beans must breath theory".  =
 But other than that, if bean breathing is not a problem, I like this =
one best!  Gail
On Jul 10, 2007, at 5:00 PM, Eddie =
Dove wrote:
Hey Gail, Some of us use a Foodsaver and vacuum = seal the greens in the plastic bags. Hope this = helps, Respectfully, Eddie -- Vita non est vivere = sed valere vita est Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafe = http://southcoastcof=feeroaster.blogspot.com/ On = 7/10/07, Gail Shuford < gshufy2u> = wrote:Can anyone tell me what most home roasters prefer to use to store = their green beans in?  (unbleached muslin bags, burlap, or?) = I've heard that burlap is best and would like to make some of my own = but cannot find any of the special burlap that is supp to be safer = for food storage.  What would be the problem with using regular = unbleached burlap from a fabric store?  I am guessing that = the chemicals used in the processing treatment would leech into = the beans?  Somehow I cant envsion this happening with a hard = coffee bean especially for 6 mos to a year of storage.  If it is = true, then how harmful could it be?  I could find no information = about this online so thought maybe someone in the SM coffee loop = might know.   Also there is the burlap odor to deal with.  It = seems like burlap is always going to smell "burlapy"...I have some = that I have aired out for weeks that still has a strong burlap odor = to it.  Any suggestions would be appreciated. (I know I can order = online from SM's and I already have done that but I am going to need = alot more so I thought about making some of my own.  It is not = that hard to sew a straight stitch if one has a sewing = machine). Thanks, Gail = = --Apple-Mail-2--349685642--

11) From: miKe mcKoffee
Depending on what "longer storage" means about the only way I know to
successfully maintain decent greens quality is vacuum sealed AND deep
freeze. Recent tests by some extreme quality conscience commercial people
bare this out. Vacuum sealing alone is not good enough long term. My own 4
year testing says vac' sealed at room temperature good for a year or so "at
best" before noticable fading occurs, two years is pushing it and ok for
some greens but others lost most of what made them great. This of course
also varies by how fresh the greens where when received and type of green.
Acidity is first to fade followed by general stale baggy tastes.
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

12) From: Gail Shuford
Your experience with the vac seal speaks to me and is the detail and  
kind of trials I am looking for.   No use to reinvent the wheel.  One  
of the variables could be "room temperature".   I have learned from  
living in a cold climate that people in warmer climates consiser room  
temp to be about 72 +degrees.   This factor could contribute to the  
quicker deterioration of the quality even if vac sealed.   Now at  
65-68 degrees, the storage life might be extended somewhat.   This is  
about what I keep my house temps.  Been able to store apples, citrus,  
potatoes, onion, dried beans, rice, oatmeal, nuts, etc. off in a  
corner of a little back room that has a cold tile floor (everything  
has a storage life but I think I have gotten the max out it).   
Storing the green beans will be a new adventure.  Consuming the green  
beans will be even better!! ha..   (oh, freezing them is good if it  
works and you have the freezer space)   Well, of course I have a  
refrigerator!!!  It is just usually always jam packed.
   Was also wondering if there is there some kind of "acid" test to  
detect whether or not a green bean is fresh?  Don't know where i am  
getting the water test where you drop a bean in glass of water and if  
it sinks it is fresh if it floats it is dead in the water!~  (stale  
that is) .  Could be an urband legend or not.  Then I think about all  
the different bean varieties and characteristics and it becomes a  
pool of so many variables, many that you cant control that it almost  
seems futile to tease your brain with it.
Didnt know that about the downward spiral when a coffee bean goes bad  
- loss of acidity...hmmm, but I had heard of bagginess just had never  
tasted it, so thanks for the great veteran knowledge sharing.  Ima  
coffee bean info magnet right now and suppose that I will be ever  
learning along with some of the great Konnaisseurs such as yourself.
On Jul 10, 2007, at 5:10 PM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: miKe mcKoffee
First rest assured, in the vast Ocean of coffee knowledge I'd fill a
thimble! I'd agree cooler would be better for coffee storage. And though
live in the Willamette Valley in the Pacific Northwest it does actually get
HOT here now and then. Like today 100+ outside on the shaded deck:-) But
unlike some ding-dongs who live in the PNW and don't think it gets hot
enough number of days to justify air-conditioning rest assured, I ain't one
of them. I know some people 'round here who on days like today go to
motels/hotels rather than spring for an air conditioner... Yeah I know the
freezer storage challenge. Even with 3 fridges, all with freezers, plus a
20cu' freezer don't have room for my greens yet! Now there is all kinds of
other vac' sealed and frozen foods like low & slow ribs, pulled pork, kalua
pork, brisquet (regular Texas style & smoked corned beef), apple cider
brined cherry smoked turkey and gravey, drunkin' chicken, smoked chicken
pieces ready for finish grillin', smoked salmons (King & Copper River),
smoked Albacore etc. all ready at a moments notice plus more "normal"
freezer items. Actually been looking at getting a used freezers for
dedicated greens storage...
Oh, "floaters" aren't a sign of aging as far as I know but rather immature
beans IIRC. They're usually found by just that floating method prior to
greens making it to market. Look, smell, then roasting and tasting the only
way I know to really judge if a coffee's gone baggy.
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

14) From: Justin Nevins
Mike, next time, don't describe your freezer contents in such detail. I
think I just drooled all over my laptop. I guess I will go grab a bowl of
cereal...
Justin Nevins
On 7/10/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Gail Shuford
Sounds like a whole lot of sizzlin going on down there in that  
beautiful Willamette.  Heat wave that is.  I'd be either passed out  
from the heat or running like crazy to find AC!  Cant say Im sorry to  
be in more modest temps.  Just wont say what the next six months will  
be like.  Shhh... dont let the cat out of the igloo, ha!)..For the  
people who are concerned about your menu below, I say, I think  
they're just jealous and if they can do better, let's hear it bec  
this sounds like some mighty good eating to me.  One would have to  
have top notch coffee to go with a palette like that or is it the  
other way around.  I have some of my own regional specialties and  
know what it is like to take pride in your stuff.  I am anxiously  
awaiting my prized Black Currant crop.   I have a rare cultivar for  
the U.S. that was given to me by a botanist friend who brought it  
over from Germany.  The jam from this variety is pass out best in the  
world, subjectively speaking of course.  Thinking about making b.c.  
wine or concentrate next.  My garden and yard are kind of demanding  
this time of year but I managed to work in two bean roastings today.   
The Westbend Poppery is definitely a better performer than the Popair  
2.   It's OK to laugh at my rudimentary operations bec I am laughing  
at myself for being so drawn into this coffee mania like an addiction  
or something...
Is your "drunken chicken" marinaded in drunken sauce or "drawn" sauce  
or was the chicken actually drunk when it was dunked in the drunken  
sauce (beer maybe)?  Oh yes, smoked salmon..bring it on!!  I actually  
loved it even before moving here.   Copper and Kind are the best! as  
you apparently know.
You have to be right on target about the acid test with coffee  
beans... why else would so much time and attention be devoted to  
"cupping"...duhh...It would be nice however to be able to tell by  
sight if the coffee was fresh or old but it doesnt appear to be the  
case.  So that's the scoop on those "floaters"...that sounds right to  
me.  I must have read that somewhere and then lost the data.  Jeffrey  
Pawlan's new roaster looks like the Cadillac of inventions doesnt  
it?  OH, have you ever had a kind of off-road coffee, Malawi Mzuzu #1 ?
On Jul 10, 2007, at 7:10 PM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: John Brown
i live in tucson arizona here in the summer we think it is cool if the 
day time temps are 100 and under, doesn't get hot enough to notice until 
the temps are over 105.
unless you are in the direct sunlight, then it is a blast furnace.
<Snip>

17) From: Lynne Biziewski
That is, unless one is from Boston - I lived in Tucson for 2 1/2 years &
thought I was baking.
Come to think of it, I was...
Lynne
we think it is cool if the day time temps are 100 and under, doesn't get hot
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18) From: Rick Copple
Gail Shuford wrote:
<Snip>
I've had some beans for over a year and a half, and so far have not had 
any bad roasts or brews. Roasted some fairly old Pac beans Tuesday, will 
be brewing a pot this morning. So we'll see how those have held up.
I store mine in a cupboard in the cloth bags SM sells. To date, I've had 
no beans go bad on me despite having some pretty old beans.
-- 
Rick Copple


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