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Topic: OT "GRAMMAR Wars" Was: Good Espresso Near Joplin, Missouri? (3 msgs / 69 lines)
1) From: Angelo
The thing that drives me crazy is the Brits' 
using a collective noun with a plural verb form.
E.g., "Microsoft have announced another useless piece of software, today"
Do they learn it that way, or is it a mistake to them, too??
<Snip>
A young lady I know was a bit upset saying, "I was almost late to that=
 event."
I had to remind her that it meant that she was on 
time... I guess it's all in your perspective...
<Snip>

2) From: Gail Shuford
Good point about the planes...Just happened to see this subject pop  
up again and thought I would offer my two cents:   I understand that  
"quantity", like less than or equal to, greater than...etc, is  
supposed to be used when and if quantitatively speaking; however we  
dont generaly speak in quantitative terms, we perform mathematical  
operations and functions with it and reference it with the spoken and  =
written word.  Now with the word "fewer".  It all starts out with a  
"few",  or several, in general terms, then proceeds to more or less  
than, qualifying it for few-er (or less than what it started out  
with)  If one increases the amount having started out with a few  
(more than one but an undisclosed amount of several), it would then  
become just "more".  "More than" , of course, would be the next level  =
above "more".  This hiercharcy would be considered qualitative and  
reference degree and intensity, be non-specific without inferring  
mathematical operations, convergencs or divergences and a myriad of  
other mathematical mumbo jumbo we can safely omit.   If someone  
wanted to pay you money for something would you want a few dollars or  =
a specific amount?  Would you be satisfied with a "few" dollars when  
less is "about" what you would get if you are not specific!  - a  
powerful tool when specifics are needed and outcomes are called for.   =
Think about this the next time you cross a bridge that isnt falling  
down and be thankful the engineers got the plans right.  It wasnt  
almost right.  It was an exactness that supports the laws of math and  =
gravity.  Anything LESS would have compromised the integrity and  
safety of the structure.  It is fine to use non specific words if one  =
does not care what outcome results.   In the case of the near miss  
below, I dont envision anyone being up in the air measuring the  
distance between two planes either.  This is where a "little" common  
cents (intentional play on word) will come in handy.
On Jul 10, 2007, at 6:50 PM, Kevin Creason wrote:
On Jul 11, 2007, at 9:31 AM, Angelo wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Angelo
Is a "gruntled" student a happy student?
<Snip>


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