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Topic: Giving HG/DB a try... (3 msgs / 80 lines)
1) From: Ian Gowen
...and 25 minutes later I end up with about 1/2 cup of baked Sulawesi.
I'll give it another go tomorrow- I was able to increase the  
efficiency of the heat gun by eliminating the extension cord between  
the gun and the socket.
-Ian

2) From: Justin Marquez
With my HG I get to FC with a 1/2# in around 13-15 minutes, depending on the
weather, wind and which beans. My HG is a Wagner 1200 watt - the lowest of
the low in HG status. (Well, maybe the People's Orange may be lower... I
dunno...) I run the HG on the highest setting and control the heat applied
by how far the nozzle is held from the beans.
I think many folks new to HG/DB are worried about scorching or "tipping" the
beans. And you should be - it is easy to do if you aren't careful to keep
the heat evenly applied.
Also, you may wish to start out with a smaller batch size while you perfect
your technique.  I'd recommend using about 1 cup dry measure for
starters. This is about 160 grams of greens, will net you about 135 gr
roasted filling about 1.7 Cups volume. You should be able to roast this in
about 10 minutes to FC or FC+ (there isn't much time diff between those
two!). After you get the hang of it with the smaller batch, do exactly the
same technique on the larger batches and it will take proportionately longer
to roast.
Oh, yes - do take a really small batch - maybe 1/2 Cup - and roast it all
the way into "oil-on-the-beans" just so you will know for sure what the
first and second cracks sound like, what a "rolling second crack" really
means. In the process of burning these test beans, try NOT waving and
stirring continuously (mentioned below) in one area of the bean mass for a
little while just to see how fast you can scorch the beans.  If you don't
want to do this to the gourmet beans we get from SM, buy some test beans
from other suppliers - a decent source of such beans is R. Dalton's in
Houston. The beans are good (athough not SM quality for sure) and are
significiantly cheaper so that you don't feel such remorse in torching them
to beyond recognition.
Try this and see how it works for you as a basic technique -
Hold the nozzle pretty close to the bean mass - about 1 to 1.5 inches. Wave
it around continuously. Stir continuosly at the same time. When you hit
first crack ( for a 1/2# batch, 1C should be around 7-10 minutes, depending
on etc... The smaller batch will hit 1C at about 5-6 min), pull the nozzle
back out a bit to maybe 2-3 inches away, continue the "Waving and Stirring"
continuously.  Every so often, say about 10 secs or so, go back in close for
a few seconds to coax out the last of the first cracks.
After you can't coax any more loud cracks, if you want to roast further
and/or to "extend" the gap between 1C and 2C,keep the nozzle back about 2-3
inches and keep the "W & S" routine going.  After you have extended the gap
as much as desired, if you want to go to 2C, go back in the close positiion
again and continue to the desired finish point.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/11/07, Ian Gowen  wrote:
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3) From: Ian Gowen
Thanks for your detailed response, Justin. I roasted a small batch of  
a Yemeni coffee I had in my stash, and I think it turned out a little  
better than the last batch. More later when I brew up a cup.
-Ian
On Jul 12, 2007, at 7:59 AM, Justin Marquez wrote:
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