HomeRoast Digest


Topic: New stash size limit, by volume not weight (9 msgs / 203 lines)
1) From: miKe mcKoffee
Well, just found and agreed to buy a used 13cu ft freezer for dedicate
greens storage. Was asking $60, agreed to $40. Picking it up this weekend. 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/

2) From: Jason
Mike,
I am still on my self grounding from even looking at the site or the RSS feed.
On 7/12/07, miKe mcKoffee  wrote:
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3) From: Peter Z
miKe,
Wasn't there a discussion on the list about freezing greens? IIRC this 
is not usually done, BUT there is a company who is experimenting with 
extreme cold, around -40F or -60F: but home freezers do not get down to 
the temperatures required.
aybe someone else remembers the discussion.
It is okay to freeze roasted, but not green.
There was a discussion about freezing roasted also. Sometimes I freeze 
roasted and it seems fine to do. Never have tried greens though.
Lots of great success with your Kafe :)
PeterZ
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
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4) From: miKe mcKoffee
Peter,
Yes there was discussion about his last year, which included me doing a home
freezer test of greens for PNWG IV which was inconclusive at best do to
various PNWG IV insanities including cracking one of the press pot carafes
prepping the taste test comparison. FWIW there is not "a" but rather a
number of cutting edge roasting concerns currently utilizing freezing greens
for longer greens life. Also FWIW what is "usually done" is of little
interest to me. What is usually done for greens storage is usually done
because it's been done that way for years and is cheapest not because it's
best for greens freshness. The preponderance of greens are still shipped in
burlap bags from origin even though there is ever growing preponderance of
evidence and agreement that greens will fair far better if vacuum sealed at
origin. My logic of the coffee bean life cycle indicated to me vacuum
sealing greens was the way to go. Now 7 years latter it's becoming a norm of
discussion and sometimes utilized for super premium greens commercially.
Note that one of the premier Brazil greens sources, Dattera, already
routinely vacuum seals their greens at origin. One reason their Brazils tend
to be some of the highest quality and also a reason they tend to cost a bit
more.
I do of course have another home freezer greens test under way which will
conclude BEFORE I'll actually load 100 plus pounds of (already vac'd) greens
into the freezer. Probably shouldn't have pulled the trigger on the freezer
yet, but been thinking about it for too long so forced my hand. 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

5) From: Peter Z
After I sent that I thought that it would not be too much of a strain to 
add some dry ice to the freezer to kick the temp down a bit if needed.
Again, I am not sure what that would cost and how long the dry ice would 
last, but the box is insulated and should be already at it's lowest setting.
Maybe dry ice would be over kill.
Just a thought.
Yourself has been one of the great innovators on this list, and I try to 
follow in your footsteps.
Unfortunately I started doing this with a very low budget (another 
victim of outsourcing/downsizing) and have not quite done everything to 
your standards.
I did get a cheapo BBQ, and then a much better one after I learned that 
we like it! 
I was really hoping that you would get to run a plantation in Hawaii :), 
but I doubt I would do that ;)
Kite flying was a blast last summer with my grand sons. When they got 
bored they would just release the string!
Just now I almost thought about vac sealing beans because of your info 
about how to get rolls cheaply.
Too bad they are out of them. Will try again next week.
PeterZ
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
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6) From: scott miller
So, like if you vac seal REAL good, I'm thinking you can pack a lot of
pounds in there!
cheers,
Scott
On 7/12/07, Peter Z  wrote:
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7) From: Bryan Wray
Peter, hasn't Terrior been storing greens in extreme cold for years?  I didn't think it was a recent "experiment" (but I'm sure that I could be wrong).  They advertise that they do this right on their website under the "wholesale" tab. (3rd paragraph down or so...)
The best experiment that I have seen around regard the storing of roasted beans was the one that was done semi-recently over on Home-Barista (www.home-barista.com).
(Trying to make a return to a list that is simply too active for me to easily keep up with)...
-Bry
 
Bryan Wray
"It is my hope that people realize that coffee is more than just a caffeine delivery service, it can be a culinary art"- Chris Owens.
 
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8) From: Justin Marquez
For those concerned about such things, use of dry ice would increase your
personal "carbon footprint".
Also, there may be some concerns over having the temperature considerably
lower in the freezer than the mfr ever intended.  Specifically, the liquid
refrigerant might not boil off in the evaporator as intended, thus
increasing the possibility that liquid referigerant would return to the
compressor, where it may do damage (depending on the type of compressor
used). Also, there may be some longterm concerns to the inside wall of the
freezer - it may become brittle with the lower temps if it is a plastic
material. And lastly, the colder temperature may increase possibility water
condensation on the outside of the insulated cavity, as the insulation was
probably not designed for that much temperature difference and may run
cooler on the outside wall.
I'm not saying "Don't do it!", but from a mechanical and process standpoint
it is similar to hauling a trailer that is heavier than the tow vehicle
mfr recommends. You can probably do it (RV owners do this more often than is
a good idea), but there is likely a price to be paid down the line because
of it.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/12/07, Peter Z  wrote:
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9) From: raymanowen
I have always believed that "Dry Ice"- solid CO2- effervesces at (-)110F=
.
I've seen references to temperatures of (-)80F for the phenomenon.
Either temperature would be far below the thermostat set point, so the
refrigeration compressor would never run if there were enough dry ice in th=
e
cabinet.
I would suggest you purchase a couple of picnic coolers made of foam poly
plastic and nest them inside the freezer cabinet or a box, if you have one,
for mechanical protection. Dry ice, placed in the nested cooler will not
effervesce very fast.
If you like your cat, don't try to keep him in the basement with the dry ic=
e
cabinet. It would be his death warrant.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Might=
y
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976


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