HomeRoast Digest


Topic: high altitude roasting and extracting (13 msgs / 229 lines)
1) From:
Evening all.  I will be traveling to Estes Park CO this summer for a family reunion.  I wanted to take my roaster and Silvia to try to make converts and show off our craft.  My wife reminded me how the altitude nearly killed our cook out last reunion.  Anyone have any experience "mountain roasting" or using an espresso machine?  Does the altitude affect it at all?  Can adjustments be made?
Thanks,
TIM

2) From: Justin Marquez
Tim,
I can't speak to the espreso question, but we spent 3 weeks in La Veta, CO
last year at 7013 Ft elevation.  I roasted and drip brewed both there and at
the gas processing plant where I was working (it was at 8000+ Ft).  It all
seemed to work as normal.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/16/07, thirddayhomeroaster 
wrote:
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3) From: David Rolenc
I live in Colorado Springs (~6000 ft) and roast and use an espresso 
machine daily. Estes Park is a good deal higher up than I am , but  I 
don't have any problems. You will find that the boiling point of water 
will be less at higher altitudes. It's just something you have to deal 
with. For example, at sea level the boiling point of water is 212 
degrees F. At 6000 ft it is 201. At 10,000 ft it is 194.
-Dave
thirddayhomeroaster wrote:
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4) From: Kris Bhatti
Hi Tim,
I don't have any science or professional experience to back this up, but I travel from sea level (southern California) to the Estes Park area several times a year with my Gaggia Coffee Deluxe and have had no problems with performance.   I've been taking the machine back and forth, low to high altitude, for about 4 years now.  My shots improved dramatically on the most recent trip because I had my dad install a PID on the Gaggia while I was there.  
I've only been roasting about 4 months but I did try one small air popper batch a few weeks ago when I was there and that worked out fine.  I don't think the altitude will cause a big problem for roasting, but of course you'll have to pay close attention and possibly make some adjustments.  There was quite a detailed discussion about altitude and the effect on the bean on this list a while back if you want scientific information.  Not sure how much help that would be in your actual roasting though.  Just watch, smell and listen.  
Have fun in Estes!
Kris
----- Original Message ----
From: "thirddayhomeroaster" 
To: homeroast: lists.sweetmarias.com 
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2007 8:57:47 PM
Subject: +high altitude roasting and extracting
Evening all.  I will be traveling to Estes Park CO this summer for a family reunion.  I wanted to take my roaster and Silvia to try to make converts and show off our craft.  My wife reminded me how the altitude nearly killed our cook out last reunion.  Anyone have any experience "mountain roasting" or using an espresso machine?  Does the altitude affect it at all?  Can adjustments be made?
Thanks,
TIMReady for the edge of your seat? 
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5) From: Brian Kamnetz
If you are roasting in a popper, be ready for the roast to go a bit faster
at the higher altitudes. You may decide to cut back a bit on the amount of
beans in a roast.
Brian
On 7/17/07, Kris Bhatti  wrote:
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6) From: Justin Marquez
As I was roasting HG/DB, I pay no real attention to the time of a roast. I
don't recall any big differences, but it could have been less and I may not
have noted it - as I mostly go by sound, smell and sights to determine when
I am done with the roast.
Do you suppose that the faster roast times may be due to the lower temps at
which water vaporizes at the higher altitude?
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/17/07, Brian Kamnetz  wrote:
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7) From: raymanowen
"... Anyone have any experience "mountain roasting" or using an espresso
machine?  Does the altitude affect it at all?  Can adjustments be made?"
Yes, yes, yes and yes. In 1948, we camped on the bank of a stream in Hidden
Valley near Estes Park. Bill was 10, I was 5. We recently located the spot,
which had a highly characteristic shape. No camping there now.
What is your roaster? I just listen for the cracks. I've never roasted at
low altitude, but I really doubt if the occurrence of the cracks will be an=
y
surprise. Estes Park itself is about 7,500ft
Espresso brewers use pressure. The Bourdon tube pressure gauges read "Gauge=
"
pressure that is the difference between the internal line and the external
Barometric pressure, so what you see is not the pressure on the coffee puck=
.
The high pressure will allow normal brewing temperatures.
Open boiling will hit 198F in Estes and you'll only get higher when the
pump is on. How fast is your heater?
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

8) From:
I have a modified popcorn popper roaster.  I entered into onto the homeroas=
ters.org roaster contest if it would help to see it.
My Silvia will go from brew to steam ready in about 45 seconds.
Thanks,
TIM
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9) From:
thanks to all up on high who replied.  I feel confident it's worth taking the roaster.  Not real clear on how it will affect the espresso machine, though.  Seems like if the water boils at a lower temperature, could cause problems.  Any thoughts anyone?
---- Justin Marquez  wrote: 
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10) From:
Okay, read all my emails before I reply next time.  Seems espresso will go okay.
Thanks,
TIM
---- Brian Kamnetz  wrote: 
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11) From: Homeroaster
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*********************
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"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************

12) From: gene nandrea
Agree with Ray. I only have experience roasting and brewing (have
PID-Silvia) at about 5500 ft.so I can't give personal experience as to what
changes might be helpful, but I am happy with my roasting and brewing
(espresso, TV, vac-pot, Mokapot) as well as some local roasters and coffee
shops. In Schomer's book he expressed an inability to get it right in
Denver. You might have to adjust timing of shot if Silvia is not PID to
optimize extraction.
Gene
On 7/17/07, raymanowen  wrote:
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13) From:
Thanks.  Did you notice a HUGE difference on your shots when you PID'd your=
 Silvia?  I've been thinking about doing that for a while on my Silvia-I ju=
st surf now.
Tim
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