HomeRoast Digest


Topic: OT: Re: +Beans ( a long, but informative post ) (2 msgs / 82 lines)
1) From: JanoMac
John (and any other interested party),
I doubt very much that the roasting will break down the hemicellulose that
is probably causing the digestive upset and providing you with a prodigious
amount of GPD (Gaseous Products of Digestion). If you roast the beans long
and deeply enough to break down the long-chain hemicellulose, I think you
wouldn't like them much -- they'd be burned!
My solution has been to invest in Beano - seriously.
The stuff is an enzyme (mostly cellulase) that they harvest from aspergillid
molds they grow in large tanks. They extract the enzyme, put it into a
little soy-based solution and >>Voila!<< you have Beano -- a "portable"
enzyme that will survive in your digestive system long enough to break down
a good portion of the hemicellulose and cellulose that your guts can't
normally digest. You have a ton of critters (actually about 1-pound by
weight; you could fit them into a 12-oz pop can if you want an image) that
live in your gut, mostly the large intestine/colon, that can break down the
hemicellulose, but they tend do too much too quickly and the result is
methane gas, carbon dioxide and a few other small molecular weight items.
You can also get a tablet form, but that hasn't worked as well for me.
At the start of your meal, you add several drops of the enzyme to your first
couple bites of the beans (works on cabbage & related plant foods, too) and
you're ready to eat the rest of the beans!
I LOVE beans of all sorts and this was a real problem for me some years
back. After I experienced beans in so many forms while traveling in Costa
Rica, I made inexpensive, nutritious and easy to prepare beans more a
regular part of my diet and to my glee, the community of micro-critters in
my gut adapted and I no longer have to use the Beano.
A weird discovery: Even when bean soup, rice & beans, and all those other
bean dishes were giving me problems, I found that if I ate red-bean chili
(the stew) that was "hot" (lots of cayenne or habanero, etc.) that I did not
get gassy or have digestive upsets!
"Weak," typical Indiana-style, un-spiced, homogenized "chili" loaded with
hamburger, red beans and tomato sauce, sometimes also containing macaroni(!)
did me in, but a bowl of anything 2-alarm or higher caused no trouble at
all.
These days, I add hot peppers to just about anything I can get away with
(before my wife sees me do it!).
...And Soy Nuts live on!!...at least here in Indiana where so much acreage
is dedicated to soy beans. At every county fair and at the state fair, you
can buy locally roasted and prepared "soy nuts" by the bag or by the pound.
They come salted, sugared & salted, plain, rolled in soy, rolled in hot
pepper (cayenne), and one company even candy coats them like peanut M&Ms.
The product wasn't nationally successful because the flavor of the bean is
less intense than peanuts when roasted crunchy, but has a kind of squishy
texture when roasted less than that. Folks also tend to have a negative
notion in their head when they hear a food name preceded by the term "soy;"
as in soy burgers, and so on.
Kirk
<Snip>

2) From: Lynne Biziewski
Beans are a big part of our family diet (good & cheap, too!), esp. since my
daughters are
vegetarian (except my older one says after the years of eating beans & rice
while in college,
and little else, she can't eat them anymore).
We also use a lot of lime juice, which we started after living in Tucson for
awhile. One of my
daughter's Hispanic friends told her that using lots of lime juice helps
w/gas.
Interesting about your experience w/the addition of hot peppers - and I know
that eating them
often does make digestion easier. (if one can take the, ahem, 'trial
period').
Lynne


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