HomeRoast Digest


Topic: finally, my first roast (10 msgs / 402 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
Well, it took long enough, but I did it.  My roaster came today, a 
chemo day for me, also.  I didn't think I would feel like trying my 
first roast, but the excitement got the better of me.  It finished 
but minutes ago.
I roasted (most likely a bit too long) Rwanda Butare Bourbon.  I know 
that a lot of the books I read and hints other roasters gave me was 
to use one of the pre-sets, then learn from there.  However, I just 
had a feeling that pre-set 2 in the IR2, for this bean was too 
long.  I don't have anything to base it on but the cracks and gut 
feel based on what I have heard and read.
So, I cut the last roasting phase by one minute and hit cool.  I did 
it.  I don't know what it will taste like, but it will be something 
like coffee.  I chewed a bean and just let it sit there and the 
flavors come to my tongue.  I tasted coffee, among a number of other 
tastes that I don't have words for yet.  I will learn them.
If my stomach is up to it tomorrow I will try a cup, then again in a 
few days.  The chemo, at times, can mess up how things taste to me, 
but not today's and I am very glad for that.  Thank you to all of you 
for sharing your knowledge.  You rock,
Stephen

2) From: Les
Congrats on the first roast!  My guess is that it is going to be a good
one!  You picked a forgiving bean.
Les
On 7/19/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Stephen Carey
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Thank you, Les.  Yes, it does seem to be a forgiving bean - that 
based on totally limited experience, but it did well, okay, it did pretty well.
What I learned:
1) it pays to be patient, learn from others, then just do it.
2) don't expect perfection the first time, but know that it doesn't 
mean a bad cup of coffee.
3) don't be afraid to play with the times and temperatures to find what works
In my case of the Rwanda Butare Bourbon beans, I used the IR2 pre-set 
2 as a starting point and, as I mentioned, had a feeling to cut the 
last cycle by a minute.  I also hear the distinctive first crack and 
what I am guessing was the second crack, that was when I knew I 
wanted the roast to end and cut the cycle back.
Rather then running to another bean I am going to work with this one 
for a couple of more roasts.
Also, as I said, I tasted a bean (I love chewing roasted beans) right 
after cooling.  And today, I brewed my first batch, a mere 10 hours 
after cooling, but I wanted to see what I had.
I can now kind of explain the taste: a slightly heavy coffee flavor, 
almost, but now quiet burned.  I swear I can taste a touch of 
chocolate in it (and I realized that before reading even more on the 
bean).  On the next roast I am cutting cycle one, which was 6 minutes 
at 455F to 5 minutes, leave cycle 2 alone, which is 400F for 4 
minutes, and cut back, as I did last night, cycle three to 30 seconds 
from 1 minute at 435F.  I hear that playing with it and practicing is 
how one learns and I think doing the above will cut back on the heavy 
coffee taste a bit, it will still be strong, but not so close to 
having a burned flavor.
Hey, I could be way off, but I won't know if I don't try.
At 10:03 PM 7/19/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Thank you, Les.  Yes, it does seem to be a forgiving
bean - that based on totally limited experience, but it did well, okay,
it did pretty well.
What I learned:
1) it pays to be patient, learn from others, then just do it.
2) don't expect perfection the first time, but know that it doesn't mean
a bad cup of coffee.
3) don't be afraid to play with the times and temperatures to find what
works
In my case of the Rwanda Butare Bourbon beans, I used the IR2
pre-set 2 as a starting point and, as I mentioned, had a feeling to cut
the last cycle by a minute.  I also hear the distinctive first crack
and what I am guessing was the second crack, that was when I knew I
wanted the roast to end and cut the cycle back.
Rather then running to another bean I am going to work with
this one for a couple of more roasts.
Also, as I said, I tasted a bean (I love chewing roasted beans) right
after cooling.  And today, I brewed my first batch, a mere 10 hours
after cooling, but I wanted to see what I had.
I can now kind of explain the taste: a slightly heavy coffee flavor,
almost, but now quiet burned.  I swear I can taste a touch of
chocolate in it (and I realized that before reading even more on the
bean).  On the next roast I am cutting cycle one, which was 6
minutes at 455F to 5 minutes, leave cycle 2 alone, which is 400F for 4
minutes, and cut back, as I did last night, cycle three to 30 seconds
from 1 minute at 435F.  I hear that playing with it and practicing
is how one learns and I think doing the above will cut back on the heavy
coffee taste a bit, it will still be strong, but not so close to having a
burned flavor.
Hey, I could be way off, but I won't know if I don't try.
At 10:03 PM 7/19/2007, you wrote:
Congrats on the first
roast!  My guess is that it is going to be a good one!  You
picked a forgiving bean.
 
Les
 
On 7/19/07, Stephen Carey
<steve
> wrote: 
Well, it took long enough, but I did it.  My roaster came today,
a
chemo day for me, also.  I didn't think I would feel like trying
my 
firCst roast, but the excitement got the better of me.  It
finished
but minutes ago.
I roasted (most likely a bit too long) Rwanda Butare Bourbon.  I
know
that a lot of the books I read and hints other roasters gave me was
to use one of the pre-sets, then learn from there.  However, I
just
had a feeling that pre-set 2 in the IR2, for this bean was too
long.  I don't have anything to base it on but the cracks and
gut
feel based on what I have heard and read. 
So, I cut the last roasting phase by one minute and hit cool.  I
did
it.  I don't know what it will taste like, but it will be
something
like coffee.  I chewed a bean and just let it sit there and
the
flavors come to my tongue.  I tasted coffee, among a number of
other
tastes that I don't have words for yet.  I will learn
them.
If my stomach is up to it tomorrow I will try a cup, then again in
a
few days.  The chemo, at times, can mess up how things taste to
me, 
but not today's and I am very glad for that.  Thank you to all
of you
for sharing your knowledge.  You rock,
Stephen
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4) From: Eddie Dove
Well done, Stephen!
Some people crave and are engaged in a never-ending search for that
chocolate you tasted!  You are on the right path and do keep up updated.
Respectfully,
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 7/20/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Les
Stephen,
If you continue to question your skills even though you are a new
roaster, just brew a pot of Folger's and you will dispel the myth that
just because you are just starting down the road of homeroasting you
have an inferior cup.   You are on the right path.  Have fun!  This is
an adventure.
Les
On 7/20/07, Eddie Dove  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Stephen Carey
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Les, solid point made.  Thank you.
At 11:06 AM 7/20/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Les, solid point made.  Thank you.
At 11:06 AM 7/20/2007, you wrote:
Stephen,
If you continue to question your skills even though you are a new
roaster, just brew a pot of Folger's and you will dispel the myth
that
just because you are just starting down the road of homeroasting you
have an inferior cup.   You are on the right path.  Have
fun!  This is
an adventure.
Les
On 7/20/07, Eddie Dove <southcoastcoffeeroaster>
wrote:
Well done, Stephen!
Some people crave and are engaged in a never-ending search for that
chocolate you tasted!  You are on the right path and do keep up
updated.
Respectfully,
Eddie
--
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafe
http://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 7/20/07, Stephen Carey <steve> wrote:
>
> Thank you, Les.  Yes, it does seem to be a forgiving bean -
that based on
totally limited experience, but it did well, okay, it did pretty
well.
>
> What I learned:
>
> 1) it pays to be patient, learn from others, then just do it.
> 2) don't expect perfection the first time, but know that it doesn't
mean a
bad cup of coffee.
> 3) don't be afraid to play with the times and temperatures to find
what
works
>
> In my case of the Rwanda Butare Bourbon beans, I used the IR2
pre-set 2 as
a starting point and, as I mentioned, had a feeling to cut the last cycle
by
a minute.  I also hear the distinctive first crack and what I am
guessing
was the second crack, that was when I knew I wanted the roast to end and
cut
the cycle back.
>
> Rather then running to another bean I am going to work with this one
for a
couple of more roasts.
>
> Also, as I said, I tasted a bean (I love chewing roasted beans)
right
after cooling.  And today, I brewed my first batch, a mere 10 hours
after
cooling, but I wanted to see what I had.
>
> I can now kind of explain the taste: a slightly heavy coffee
flavor,
almost, but now quiet burned.  I swear I can taste a touch of
chocolate in
it (and I realized that before reading even more on the bean).  On
the next
roast I am cutting cycle one, which was 6 minutes at 455F to 5
minutes,
leave cycle 2 alone, which is 400F for 4 minutes, and cut back, as I
did
last night, cycle three to 30 seconds from 1 minute at 435F.  I hear
that
playing with it and practicing is how one learns and I think doing the
above
will cut back on the heavy coffee taste a bit, it will still be strong,
but
not so close to having a burned flavor.
>
> Hey, I could be way off, but I won't know if I don't try.
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_258875406==.ALT--

7) From: miKe mcKoffee
Congrats, enjoy the journey!
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

8) From:
I hadn't heard of eating a bean to get a feel for the taste.  I occasionally cup my roasts, but it's sometimes a pain when I'm doing lots of my tiny batches.  How close do the tastes you get when you chew a bean come to the final cup?
---- Stephen Carey  wrote: 
<Snip>

9) From: Floyd Lozano
I think the easy answer is to set aside one or two beans, grind and brew as
you usually do, chew a bean and taste your coffee.  I taste a lot of what
ends up in the cup when I chew a bean or two.  If the bean is sweet, or
nutty, or strawberryish, or chocolaty, or sadly, charred and burnt tasting,
I know that's what I am going to taste in my coffee.  I don't always taste
everything that will be in the cup, but what I do taste makes it in there
for sure.
-F
On 7/21/07, thirddayhomeroaster 
wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: raymanowen
100% extraction, right? How fresh can you get, with no chance of staling!
-ro
On 7/21/07, Floyd Lozano  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"When the theme hits the bass, I dance the Jig!" - -Virgil Fox at the Mighty
Wichita (ex- NYC Paramount) WurliTzer- 1976


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