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Topic: Hario tabletop vac brewer (10 msgs / 191 lines)
1) From: Slinkster
I'm picking up a Hario tomorrow.  The current owner bought it in Japan 
and has never used it - she unboxed it to photograph the thing, that's 
all, so theoretically it is complete.  Are there any tips or tweaks not 
on Tom's instruction sheet that I should know about before I start 
abusing it?

2) From: Angelo
I would suggest that you acquire a butane burner to replace the 
alcohol lamp that comes with it...These can be picked up for about 
$20 on the net...Last I looked, Hario was asking $52 for the exact 
same burner...
A
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3) From: John Brown
you need to read the voltage and frequency requirements on the name 
plate data.
it has been more than thirty years since i lived in Japan.  but i do 
remember they have a different voltage and frequency than we do.  i 
think  50hz
Slinkster wrote:
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4) From: raymanowen
"...any tips or tweaks not on Tom's instruction sheet that I should know
about before I start
abusing it?"
Yes- Don't abuse it, be gentle.
If it has an electric heater, just match the voltage. It's not sensitive to
the power frequency. In Japan, they actually have 220v mains, while you
probably have an actual voltage of 225 - 250v. (Electric range, clothes
dryer, water heater) 250v makes nearly 30% more heat than 220v.
In the US, the 250v plugs and outlets are similar to the for 120v  3 prong
grounded ones, except the blades are both horizontal. You could use
three-prong Twist-Lock connectors, they're pretty expensive, though. Or,
maybe you could locate a compatible Japanese outlet connector to match the
Hario plug.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

5) From: Vicki Smith
SM is going to carry those shortly. I saw info about it on the page with 
their vacs. They are just waiting for delivery. It will be $28.
Vicki
Angelo wrote:
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6) From: Michael Wascher
Last I was in Japan, two years ago, they used 115 VAC 50Hz. 50Hz vs. 60 Hz
shouldn't make a difference for a heating element. Synchronous motors would
run more slowly, but that shouldn't be an issue unless the Hario uses one as
a timer. The plug is the same as the unpolarized 2-prong US plug (i.e. both
prongs are the same size so it will plug into the US wall outlet either
way).
I had no problems with any US compatible electrical equipment working in
Japan.
--MikeW
On 7/20/07, raymanowen  wrote:
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-- 
"We are confronted with insurmountable opportunities." --Walt Kelly

7) From: Woody DeCasere
my advice, get an electic tea pot, and boil the water first, after it boils
add it to the pot, put the top on and then light the burner, it cuts the
time down drastically, unless you have about 1/2 to brew coffee that is up
to you.
it makes one great cup of coffee, bull bodied and rich, with no bitter
flavors or sludge in the cup. I find that Kona really works well in a vac
pot.
On 7/19/07, Slinkster  wrote:
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-- 
"And we'd better not risk another frontal assault, that rabbit's dynamite!!"http://www.decasere.blogspot.com/

8) From: Branden Byers
I highly recommend the butane tabletop burner that was already mentioned. I
use a bodum water heater to bring the water to a boil before placing in the
vacpot. I use a digital thermometer to measure and stabalize the temperature
of the water that rises to the top. After I have the desired temperature for
a specific coffee, then I drop the coffee into the top and stir with a
whisk.
There are many variables to play around and experiment with. Change the
grind, brew ratio, temp, number of stirs, and duration to experience
completely different cups with the same coffee. I found a detailed
explanation of how to use a 2-cup Vacpot on Barismo.com and recomment
checking out the video instructions.
What size brewer are you getting? I have a 2-cup and 5-cup Hario. I much
prefer the 2-cup because I can experiment a lot more without as much waste.
As for cleaning, I rinse off the cloth filter and then store it in a jar
full of water in the refridgerator. This helps keep away the off flavors.
For the bottom portion of glass, I just rinse that out with water. For the
top glass and tube, I rinse and then dry. I do not use soap as long as there
is no build-up of coffee oils (by wiping it off most left over oils are
gone).
Enjoy your new brewer!
Branden

9) From: Slinkster
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I'm planning to buy one.  In the meantime I'll use it outdoors with the 
alcohol burner to reduce fire risk due to cats or kids knocking over the 
lamp.
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Yep, the instructions say to do that.
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Huh?  Meaning you move the burner in and out under the lower bottle to 
control the water temp?
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Sounds like FP.  Sort of.
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That's a great site, thanks!
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It's the TCA2, which I presume is a 2-cup model.
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Is that really necessary?  I use a cloth filter in the drip pot when I 
make drip.  After each use I give it a bath with hot water and a bit of 
bleach, then air dry and store int he cabinet in a little paper bag.  
Can I use brown paper disc filters instead of the cloth filter?
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I suspect that's as much as I'll do, as well.  My usual method of 
cleaning the drip carafe is to dump in crushed ice and table salt and 
swirl it around - when the carafe is cold, of course.  Soap doesn't go 
near any of my coffee equipment.
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I plan to, thanks!

10) From: Branden Byers
Regarding measuring temps, the reason why the butane table burner is
such a great investment is that it has an adjustable temperature. This
makes for easy temp control. Usually it is rather quick to adjust and
stabalize the temp, but if I'm not watching carefully at the
beginning, sometimes the temp will rise too fast and it takes over a
minute to lower and stabalize.
Great to hear that it is a 2-cup brewer, I think you'll really enjoy
it! As for the filter, I find it to be easier to leave it in the
fridge. You could always test out the differences by brewing water
only through the filter and seeing how the different methods of
storage and cleaning change the flavor of the water.
One other variable I forgot to mention: the dose. I use 28-32 grams of
coffee for the 2-cup. It may sound like a lot for 10oz of coffee, but
using the vacpot takes more coffee than other methods. I started out
with Hario's recommended 10g per 5oz (20oz total) and produced decent
results but once it was recommended to me to try the higher dosage, I
find it brings out so much more in the cup.
Have fun!
Branden
On 7/20/07, Slinkster  wrote:
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