HomeRoast Digest


Topic: coffee in boston (7 msgs / 139 lines)
1) From: john nanavati
hey,
i'm teaching in boston and ran across a good coffee roaster/cafe - Boston
Beanstock Coffee Company. They made a nice americano this morning, didn't
seem to overroast the beans like *$ and Peets and had good barrista.
Not the quality of the barristas that we saw at Joe in NYC, but it was very
drinkable.
John Nanavati, DHI, CIT
Plainfield, New Jersey

2) From: Lynne Biziewski
Cool. Never have been there, but I heard of it.
Where are you teaching?
Lynne
On 7/20/07, john nanavati  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: mirrera
John,
Thanks for the tip -- they are a short walk from me, so I'll put it on the list to go and try.
I haven't sampled all of the coffee shops in Boston, by any means, but to me it seems a bit of a wasteland when it comes to quality, especially having moved here from the LES in NYC (the original location of Ninth St. Espresso was my local).  Simon's in Cambridge is the notable exception -- they are teriffic.
-AdkMike
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4) From: Lynne Biziewski
If you ever head up towards Beverly, don't leave the city w/out trying the
Atomic Cafe.
L.
On 7/20/07, mirrera  wrote:
<Snip>

5) From: Floyd Lozano
I am stunned by the poor coffee in Boston.  It's ripe for gourmet
opportunity.  I tried 3 places in the North End, the Italian section of all
places and the BEST espresso I had was made by a Franke Evolution, a
pushbutton machine, at Lulu's Bakery.  Granted I didn't try all the coffee
joints there, but two of the mainstays, Cafe Vittoria and Cafe Paradiso were
less than impressive.  Lulu's at least was using George Howell's Daterra
north italian roast for their espresso, which probably had a lot to do with
the flavor.  Still have yet to find a place that compares to Simon's in
Cambridge.
I am curious about the 'local microroasters' Beanstock employs to provide
their coffee - there are not that many such places.  Red Barn roasters and
George Howell are the two main ones that come immediately to mind.  In fact,
the intersection of their offerings is a one to one match for the coffee
menu at Beanstock, so I guess that answers that question!  I'll have to give
it a shot (or rather have them give me one).  As I recall, Red Barn isn't
too bad, but do go a little darker than I would on the Yirg.
-F
On 7/20/07, Lynne Biziewski  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Lynne Biziewski
I think the problem is that these places make plenty of money with swill
coffee - so why
invest the time & money? The bottom line with MOST shopkeepers is money. Of
course,
they have to make a profit - but doesn't anyone have pride of workmanship
anymore? Did it go
out with manual Royal typewriters and watches that actually are wound by
hand...?
I haven't been to Simon's yet, but when I actually talked with one of the
owners of The Atomic
Cafe, I was thrilled. Not only did I get great coffee, but he really knows
his stuff.
I wish THAT cafe was right around the corner from me!
At any rate, you are so right. Boston IS ripe for a great opportunity.
Of course, we always have Dunkins'. Everywhere. Absolutely EVERYWHERE.
L.
On 7/20/07, Floyd Lozano  wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: Michael I
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Floyd,
I stop at Red Barn out in Westboro occasionally on my way out to work (I
sometimes work in Westboro), and their coffee is quite good, though I often
get an iced coffee or iced red eye there.  The brewed stuff is pretty good,
too, especially when I'm not coming directly from home, so don't have a mug
of my own with me.  Not enough to bring up the Boston quality average
substantially, but better than many alternatives.
-AdkMike  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Floyd Lozano
Sent: Friday, July 20, 2007 4:47 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +coffee in boston
I am stunned by the poor coffee in Boston.  It's ripe for gourmet
opportunity.  I tried 3 places in the North End, the Italian section of all
places and the BEST espresso I had was made by a Franke Evolution, a
pushbutton machine, at Lulu's Bakery.  Granted I didn't try all the coffee
joints there, but two of the mainstays, Cafe Vittoria and Cafe Paradiso were
less than impressive.  Lulu's at least was using George Howell's Daterra
north italian roast for their espresso, which probably had a lot to do with
the flavor.  Still have yet to find a place that compares to Simon's in
Cambridge. 
I am curious about the 'local microroasters' Beanstock employs to provide
their coffee - there are not that many such places.  Red Barn roasters and
George Howell are the two main ones that come immediately to mind.  In fact,
the intersection of their offerings is a one to one match for the coffee
menu at Beanstock, so I guess that answers that question!  I'll have to give
it a shot (or rather have them give me one).  As I recall, Red Barn isn't
too bad, but do go a little darker than I would on the Yirg. 
-F


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