HomeRoast Digest


Topic: I-Roast 2 Questions (8 msgs / 520 lines)
1) From: happyusx4
Greetings!
I have been lurking and learning for some time.  I appreciate the free flowing information on this list and now I hope you'll help me!
I started roasting on a popcorn popper and really enjoyed the results and so I decided to move up to the I-Roast 2.  I started with the company's pre-set 2 for my first roast and ended up with burned beans.  I didn't stop it early since I was trying to see what the pre-set would do - yuck! I then programmed my own pre-set using the suggested roast in the Sweet Marias tip sheet for a city roast (Stage 1 350 for 2 min, Stage 2 400 for 3 min, Stage 3 460 for 4 1/2 min.). Once again I got badly burned beans.  I checked the temps during the roast and they varied from 320 to 390, no higher but I understand that is not the bean temp and the actual temp may vary. I did a third roast where I stopped the roaster early but the flavor of my coffee was still less than good, it was quite bitter.
My question is why are my beans burning at the "normal" pre-set times?  The unit was clean with no chaf or build up of oils. I have never tested the electric, it is a new service and I have no problems with other appliances working well. (I roasted on my stove top under the hood vent.)
Should I just adjust the time to less or do I need to lower the temps?  (I don't want to bake my beans but baked is better than burned!)  What pre-sets are others using?
I appreciate any suggestions!
Nancy
"Roasting worse than Starbucks"   
Greetings!
 
I have been lurking and learning for some time.  I appreciate the free flowing information on this list and now I hope you'll help me!
 
I started roasting on a popcorn popper and really enjoyed the results and so I decided to move up to the I-Roast 2.  I started with the company's pre-set 2 for my first roast and ended up with burned beans.  I didn't stop it early since I was trying to see what the pre-set would do - yuck! I then programmed my own pre-set using the suggested roast in the Sweet Marias tip sheet for a city roast (Stage 1 350 for 2 min, Stage 2 400 for 3 min, Stage 3 460 for 4 1/2 min.). Once again I got badly burned beans.  I checked the temps during the roast and they varied from 320 to 390, no higher but I understand that is not the bean temp and the actual temp may vary. I did a third roast where I stopped the roaster early but the flavor of my coffee was still less than good, it was quite bitter.
 
My question is why are my beans burning at the "normal" pre-set times?  The unit was clean with no chaf or build up of oils. I have never tested the electric, it is a new service and I have no problems with other appliances working well. (I roasted on my stove top under the hood vent.)
 
Should I just adjust the time to less or do I need to lower the temps?  (I don't want to bake my beans but baked is better than burned!)  What pre-sets are others using?
 
I appreciate any suggestions!
 
Nancy
"Roasting worse than Starbucks"   
 
 

2) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-49-854938995
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With any of the i-Roasts, results  vary depending on the way the  
individual unit has been calibrated (a crapshoot) and the strength  
and stability of your household voltage. My i-Roast and i-Roast 2  
both run hot, and I don't own a variac, so I found that using a heavy  
extension cord does drop the voltage to a lower level and can help  
keep my beans from burning. But be aware that heavier and denser  
beans may not move around as well and roast much, much faster--so use  
a smaller quantity when you roast them to avoid burning and even  
causing the circuit breaker to kick in and shut off the heater and fan.
On Jul 24, 2007, at 6:20 PM, happyusx4 wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
--Apple-Mail-49-854938995
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	charsetO-8859-1
With any of the i-Roasts, =
results  vary depending on the way the individual unit has been =
calibrated (a crapshoot) and the strength and stability of your =
household voltage. My i-Roast and i-Roast 2 both run hot, and I don't =
own a variac, so I found that using a heavy extension cord does drop the =
voltage to a lower level and can help keep my beans from burning. But be =
aware that heavier and denser beans may not move around as well and =
roast much, much faster--so use a smaller quantity when you roast them =
to avoid burning and even causing the circuit breaker to kick in and =
shut off the heater and fan.
On Jul 24, 2007, at 6:20 PM, =
happyusx4 =
wrote:
Greetings!   I have been = lurking and learning for some time.  I appreciate the free flowing = information on this list and now I hope you'll help me! =   I started roasting on a popcorn popper and really = enjoyed the results and so I decided to move up to the I-Roast 2.  I = started with the company's pre-set 2 for my first roast and ended up = with burned beans.  I didn't stop it early since I was trying to see = what the pre-set would do - yuck! I then programmed my own pre-set using = the suggested roast in the Sweet Marias tip sheet for a city roast = (Stage 1 350 for 2 min, Stage 2 400 for 3 min, Stage 3 460 for 4 1/2 = min.). Once again I got badly burned beans.  I checked the temps = during the roast and they varied from 320 to 390, no higher but I = understand that is not the bean temp and the actual temp may vary. I did = a third roast where I stopped the roaster early but the flavor of my = coffee was still less than good, it was quite bitter.  = My question is why are my beans burning at the "normal" pre-set = times?  The unit was clean with no chaf or build up of oils. I = have never tested the electric, it is a new service and I have no = problems with other appliances working well. (I roasted on my stove top = under the hood vent.)   Should I just adjust the = time to less or do I need to lower the temps?  (I don't want to bake = my beans but baked is better than burned!)  What pre-sets are others = using?   I appreciate any suggestions! =   Nancy "Roasting worse than = Starbucks"      =   Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-49-854938995--

3) From: Barry Luterman
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
In short for many of the machines and homes the pre sets a run too hot. =
You will have to program your machine. Once you find the programs that =
suit your needs save them to memory.

4) From: Stephen Carey
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Nancy, you don't mention the size of your roasts.  I am very new to 
roasting, only have roasted a few times, but all on the IR2.  This is 
just MY experience, the amount of the roast is a very big deal on the 
presets.  Also, I have backed off every roast from what the "recipe" 
is - either on time, temp or both.  I always end on a slightly 
warmer, but fairly short final cycle as compared to the cycle before that one.
I just roasted a Sumatra Classic Mandheling at: stage 1 - 455 degrees 
for 5 min; stage 2 - 400 for  min; stage 3 - 435 for 45 seconds.  I 
got a very nice roast, but can do better by lengthening the final 
cycle to 1 minute, I believe.
The very first roast I started on the machine's preset 2, but by gut 
feeling, look, sound and smell I cut the final roast down to 25 
seconds, there was no way it would last the full 1:30 for the final 
roast without being on the burnt side of things.
This is for my machine, I really don't know how it all transfers from 
machine to machine.  However, the first two roasts were with an 
ambient temperature of 74 degrees, on the stove, below the exhaust 
fan.  The last roast was outside with a surprisingly low ambient 
temperature of 73 degrees (in this area, DC, it is usually in the high 80's).
I hope this helps a little.  I certainly can pass on what others have 
told me, keep good records and just try things out until you get 
familiar with your machine.  Once familiar with it, you will be 
comfortable with it and will be roasting as you did with the popcorn 
popper you used.
All the best,
Stephen
At 07:20 PM 7/24/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Nancy, you don't mention the size of your roasts.  I am
very new to roasting, only have roasted a few times, but all on the
IR2.  This is just MY experience, the amount of the roast is a very
big deal on the presets.  Also, I have backed off every roast from
what the "recipe" is - either on time, temp or both.  I
always end on a slightly warmer, but fairly short final cycle as compared
to the cycle before that one.
I just roasted a Sumatra Classic Mandheling at: stage 1 - 455 degrees for
5 min; stage 2 - 400 for  min; stage 3 - 435 for 45 seconds.  I
got a very nice roast, but can do better by lengthening the final cycle
to 1 minute, I believe.  
The very first roast I started on the machine's preset 2, but by gut
feeling, look, sound and smell I cut the final roast down to 25 seconds,
there was no way it would last the full 1:30 for the final roast without
being on the burnt side of things.
This is for my machine, I really don't know how it all transfers from
machine to machine.  However, the first two roasts were with an
ambient temperature of 74 degrees, on the stove, below the exhaust
fan.  The last roast was outside with a surprisingly low ambient
temperature of 73 degrees (in this area, DC, it is usually in the high
80's).  
I hope this helps a little.  I certainly can pass on what others
have told me, keep good records and just try things out until you get
familiar with your machine.  Once familiar with it, you will be
comfortable with it and will be roasting as you did with the popcorn
popper you used.
All the best,
Stephen
At 07:20 PM 7/24/2007, you wrote:
Greetings!
 
I have been lurking and learning for some time.  I appreciate the
free flowing information on this list and now I hope you'll help me!
 
I started roasting on a popcorn popper and really enjoyed the results and
so I decided to move up to the I-Roast 2.  I started with the
company's pre-set 2 for my first roast and ended up with burned
beans.  I didn't stop it early since I was trying to see what the
pre-set would do - yuck! I then programmed my own pre-set using the
suggested roast in the Sweet Marias tip sheet for a city roast (Stage 1
350 for 2 min, Stage 2 400 for 3 min, Stage 3 460 for 4 1/2 min.). Once
again I got badly burned beans.  I checked the temps during the
roast and they varied from 320 to 390, no higher but I understand that is
not the bean temp and the actual temp may vary. I did a third roast where
I stopped the roaster early but the flavor of my coffee was still less
than good, it was quite bitter.
 
My question is why are my beans burning at the "normal" pre-set
times?  The unit was clean with no chaf or build up of oils. I have
never tested the electric, it is a new service and I have no problems
with other appliances working well. (I roasted on my stove top under the
hood vent.)
 
Should I just adjust the time to less or do I need to lower the
temps?  (I don't want to bake my beans but baked is better than
burned!)  What pre-sets are others using?
 
I appreciate any suggestions!
 
Nancy
"Roasting worse than Starbucks"   
 
 
--=====================_20413890==.ALT--

5) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
IMO the biggest problem inherent in virtually all off the shelf air home
roasters is they roast way too fast, especially early stages of the roast.
Generally speaking use the lowest temp setting possible first stage with the
IR. Earlier today a website was mentioned in the P1 profile query that had
some good I-Roast specific discussion. Here it is again:http://iyume.com/coffee/iroast/RoastProfileSample.html 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Stephen Carey
Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2007 4:52 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +I-Roast 2 Questions
Nancy, you don't mention the size of your roasts.  I am very new to
roasting, only have roasted a few times, but all on the IR2.  This is just
MY experience, the amount of the roast is a very big deal on the presets.
Also, I have backed off every roast from what the "recipe" is - either on
time, temp or both.  I always end on a slightly warmer, but fairly short
final cycle as compared to the cycle before that one.
I just roasted a Sumatra Classic Mandheling at: stage 1 - 455 degrees for 5
min; stage 2 - 400 for  min; stage 3 - 435 for 45 seconds.  I got a very
nice roast, but can do better by lengthening the final cycle to 1 minute, I
believe.  
The very first roast I started on the machine's preset 2, but by gut
feeling, look, sound and smell I cut the final roast down to 25 seconds,
there was no way it would last the full 1:30 for the final roast without
being on the burnt side of things.
This is for my machine, I really don't know how it all transfers from
machine to machine.  However, the first two roasts were with an ambient
temperature of 74 degrees, on the stove, below the exhaust fan.  The last
roast was outside with a surprisingly low ambient temperature of 73 degrees
(in this area, DC, it is usually in the high 80's).  
I hope this helps a little.  I certainly can pass on what others have told
me, keep good records and just try things out until you get familiar with
your machine.  Once familiar with it, you will be comfortable with it and
will be roasting as you did with the popcorn popper you used.
All the best,
Stephen
At 07:20 PM 7/24/2007, you wrote:
Greetings!
 
I have been lurking and learning for some time.  I appreciate the free
flowing information on this list and now I hope you'll help me!
 
I started roasting on a popcorn popper and really enjoyed the results and so
I decided to move up to the I-Roast 2.  I started with the company's pre-set
2 for my first roast and ended up with burned beans.  I didn't stop it early
since I was trying to see what the pre-set would do - yuck! I then
programmed my own pre-set using the suggested roast in the Sweet Marias tip
sheet for a city roast (Stage 1 350 for 2 min, Stage 2 400 for 3 min, Stage
3 460 for 4 1/2 min.). Once again I got badly burned beans.  I checked the
temps during the roast and they varied from 320 to 390, no higher but I
understand that is not the bean temp and the actual temp may vary. I did a
third roast where I stopped the roaster early but the flavor of my coffee
was still less than good, it was quite bitter.
 
My question is why are my beans burning at the "normal" pre-set times?  The
unit was clean with no chaf or build up of oils. I have never tested the
electric, it is a new service and I have no problems with other appliances
working well. (I roasted on my stove top under the hood vent.)
 
Should I just adjust the time to less or do I need to lower the temps?  (I
don't want to bake my beans but baked is better than burned!)  What pre-sets
are others using?
 
I appreciate any suggestions!
 
Nancy
"Roasting worse than Starbucks"   
 

6) From: Larry Johnson
I just (30 minutes ago) roasted 1 cup of Mexico FTO Chiapas - Special Lot to
about FC+ using the Preset 2, switching to cool mode with about 3 minutes
left in the cycle. Haven't brewed yet, but the beans look and smell great.
Oh, the ambient here in Athens, GA is about 86 F, and the humidity ~ 35%.
These are both factors that can affect roasts as well, BTW.
To echo several (more learned) others here; you have to try it and see what
works. Take notes. Refer to your notes often. Above all: Have fun.
On 7/24/07, happyusx4  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do.  -
Walter Bagehot

7) From: Aaron
With the I roasts you have to play around and see what works for you.  
Each machine has a mind of it's own and behaves differently.  I have 4 
of them and can attest to this soundly.
As you do experiment with them to try to tweak it in for your 
perfection, remember to only adjust one thing at a time.  If you want to 
try a temp change do that, if you want to try less or more beans, try 
that, or longer roasts, etc.. do one at a time, this way you don't get 
confused as to what you did, and when you find something that works 
you'll know what made it work and why, and are not guessing as to which 
'thing' caused it to work better this time... by going this route, next 
time you have to tweak in a bean for the best roast, you'll know what 
does what for you and are not stuck trying to reinvent how to roast coffee.
Aaron

8) From: Ross
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Nancy,
My IR2 will also produce pure charcoal if I use the preset programs.  If =
you don't have a variac to control voltage, your IR2 will be different =
every time you plug it in somewhere new, I can only speak for mine but =
it also runs hot on "standard" household voltage.   The best thing you =
can do is program lower temps and remember the cool button is the way to =
finish a roast at the right time in the IR2.  Experiment with lower =
programmed temps and try to stretch the time to 1st crack as long as you =
can (good luck getting anything over 8 minutes) remember after 1st crack =
you might want to drop the temp even further to stretch the time to 2nd =
as much as possible, it will take some experimenting.  You can get some =
very nice roasts if you watch it and terminate with the cool button at =
an appropriate level of roast.  Look on the SM web site for help in =
deciding what level of roast you want.  I finally sprung for a Variac =
and inserted a long thermometer in the top of my IRoast, it works great, =
and I am able to replicate good results.  You can drive yourself crazy =
trying to use the built in temperature function because it is all over =
the place and really has no relation to the actual bean mass temp.
The cheapest mod that will help a lot is the temp probe.  Get the 8 in =
Cooper thermometer from SM and drill a hole in the screen and chaff cup =
so you can insert it in the bean mass.  That one mod will give you the =
big picture.  You will notice 1st crack almost always happens at the =
same temperature and you will be able to make some better decisions on =
your programs.  As others have mentioned if your voltage is too hot use =
some long (like a couple 100 foot) extension cords or spring for a =
Variac and get almost total control.  
Good luck,
Ross


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