HomeRoast Digest


Topic: vaguely OT: uses for coffee grounds (16 msgs / 361 lines)
1) From: Silvia Marsh
I've seen people talk about what they do with their coffee grounds before,
but there's a couple here that I haven't seen. Have fun:http://www.diylife.com/2007/07/25/the-many-uses-for-coffee-grounds/Silvia

2) From: Leo Zick
i cant imagine how used coffee grounds will improve the smell of anything.
just ask my garbage can.
most old school italians i know dump espresso grounds into their gardens.
highly doubt it does a thing, but at least it blends in well, and probably
decomposes at a minimum.
On 7/25/07, Silvia Marsh  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From:
not of topic at all Silvia,
thanks for the information!
way cool,
ginny
---- Silvia Marsh  wrote: 
<Snip>

4) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
I don't know about the odor reduction in the frig or your hands, but it
gives a different odor to my worms. I have a 5 gal. bucket that I keep my
worms in for fishing, and they do a pretty good job of decomposing the
coffee grounds, and the added benefit of a stronger odor to the worm. Seems
to help in the fish attraction area.
I am thinking of using the decaf grounds though, it's getting really hard to
get them on the hook with all the caffeine they have been chewing.
TerryT
On 7/25/07, Leo Zick  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...
(I'm the tall guy in the middle)

5) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
LOL:-) But you might want to reconsider the decaf. Could be not just the
aroma but also the hyper-active caffeinated worms attracting the fiddies.
 
miKe  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of TERRY TITSWORTH
Sent: Wednesday, July 25, 2007 9:56 AM
I don't know about the odor reduction in the frig or your hands, but it
gives a different odor to my worms. I have a 5 gal. bucket that I keep my
worms in for fishing, and they do a pretty good job of decomposing the
coffee grounds, and the added benefit of a stronger odor to the worm. Seems
to help in the fish attraction area. 
I am thinking of using the decaf grounds though, it's getting really hard to
get them on the hook with all the caffeine they have been chewing.
 
TerryT

6) From: MSMB
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
My wife, an avid listener of Mike McGraff on the NPR program about gardening
("You Bet Your Garden," I think) stopped putting the grinds into her garden
after hearing that they were too acidic.  She decided the grounds accounted
for the difficulty she was having with tomato plants and probably not good
for flowers either..  But she was thinking that they were OK for leafy
plants and bushes.  You can probably check out the program's web site for
this.  
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Leo Zick
Sent: Wednesday, July 25, 2007 12:39 PM
To: homeroast
Subject: Re: +vaguely OT: uses for coffee grounds
i cant imagine how used coffee grounds will improve the smell of anything.
just ask my garbage can.
most old school italians i know dump espresso grounds into their gardens.
highly doubt it does a thing, but at least it blends in well, and probably
decomposes at a minimum. 
On 7/25/07, Silvia Marsh  wrote:
I've seen people talk about what they do with their coffee grounds before,
but there's a couple here that I haven't seen. Have fun:http://www.diylife.com/2007/07/25/the-many-uses-for-coffee-grounds/Silvia

7) From: Leo Zick
guess someone should start promoting more java blends and stuff then, huh??
:)
On 7/25/07, MSMB  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: John Brown
it make for very good worms for fishing.
i remember one of my neighbors doing this back in the fifties.  he 
always had worms to go fishing with.
one of my friends does this now for his garden he even goes to the near 
by coffe3 shop to get the grounds.
Leo Zick wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: John Brown
it would depend on the soil conditions in your local area.
Tucson Arizona is very alkaline.
MSMB wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: JanoMac
Rather than give up on coffee grounds, a better solution is to compost the
stuff before putting it into the garden. Once the critters go through the
coffee -- or rather after the grounds go through the critters  -- it
is buffered and quite good for the soil and your plants.
"Normal" pH of good soil is just below 7 (neutral). "Most" garden plants (o=
f
course there are notable exceptions, as expected) do best with pH in the
range 6.5-6.8. 
If you put "raw" grounds out, they will leach and acidify the soil --
wonderful for roses and absolutely loved by Rhododendrons and Azaleas and
many evergreen shrubs. Add a little iron and your pines will thank you for
it, too! If you compost the stuff with your kitchen scraps, grass clippings
and lawn leaves, then the critters (various little insects, worms, bacteria=
,
& fungi) process the material, the pH gets to around 6.7 or so and is
buffered so that it doesn't swing wildly acid or alkaline.
I cannot imagine a master gardener suggesting folks NOT use coffee grounds
in their compost...unless they are growing cacti or field corn (these prefe=
r
conditions more on the alkaline side). The coffee even adds some trace
materials not found in my lawn clippings. My 'maters love the compost I mak=
e
with grounds; as do my melons, squash, cabbage family plants, and all but a
couple of my flowers (the true, dyed-in-the-proverbial-wool prairie plants
like it a little more alkaline). For my alkaline-loving plants, I add a
handful of bone meal around them when I dig in the compost and all is well.
Kirk
<Snip>
ing
<Snip>
en
<Snip>
ed
<Snip>
d for
<Snip>
 and
<Snip>

11) From: Aaron
some plants love acid though, so the grounds will actually do them good.
I throw my grounds into my plants, mostly peppers,  some sugar canes, 
coffee plants, peanuts, saffron, and strawberries and they all seem to 
love it.  If you bury them in grounds it might be a problem, but a 
little mixed with the regular soil if they are planted in the ground I 
don't see how it would hurt very much.
Aaron

12) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
i don't think coffee grounds acidify soil much, as john writes it 
depends on your existing soil. nor does it contribute much 
nutrionally but what it does have is great texture! i have 2 worm 
systems for composting, plus another compost that happens to have a 
lot of worms. i always wonder of the caffeine is making the poor 
little fellows so productive, but they love the texture/air/drainage 
of the grounds, and it is a perfect compliment to heavy organic 
matter in their bedding. so look into a worm farm using california 
red worms - its such a clean way to compost you can actually do it 
indoors, like in a pantry near the kitchen.
<Snip>
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

13) From: Lynne Biziewski
Thank you, Kirk - very informative!
I haven't gardened in quite awhile - couldn't remember enough to write, but
you
certainly shared some great info with us.
Makes me wish I had my own place again, just so I could have a garden!
Lynne
On 7/25/07, JanoMac  wrote:
<Snip>
e
<Snip>
t
<Snip>
r
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
s
<Snip>
r
<Snip>

14) From: Sandy Andina
--Apple-Mail-72-954541613
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
Content-Type: text/plain;
	charset-ASCII;
	delsp=yes;
	format=flowed
I put it into the garbage disposal if I have been using garlic and  
onions--it's a great odor-neutralizer, and I even plunge my hands  
into my knockbox and break up the pucks if I've been chopping garlic,  
onions or shallots.
On Jul 25, 2007, at 7:14 PM, Aaron wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
--Apple-Mail-72-954541613
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
Content-Type: text/html;
	charsetO-8859-1
I put it into the garbage =
disposal if I have been using garlic and onions--it's a great =
odor-neutralizer, and I even plunge my hands into my knockbox and break =
up the pucks if I've been chopping garlic, onions or =
shallots.
On Jul 25, 2007, at 7:14 PM, Aaron =
wrote:
some plants love acid though, so = the grounds will actually do them good. I throw my = grounds into my plants, mostly peppers,  some sugar canes, coffee = plants, peanuts, saffron, and strawberries and they all seem to love = it.  If you bury them in = grounds it might be a problem, but a little mixed with the regular soil = if they are planted in the ground I don't see how it would hurt very = much. Aaronhomeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-72-954541613--

15) From: CoffeeRoastersClub
Hello.  I see where Terry has used coffee grounds for feeding her 
fishing worms.  Years ago I used to raise redworms (a.k.a. "Red 
Wigglers") for fishing, and I feed them used coffee grounds very 
often.  They would not mold as quickly as the corn meal you also feed 
them.  Also another good use is in gardening.  In fact it must be a 
very popular use as our local Starbucks has containers of bagged used 
grounds out for the public to take for free "for gardening".
I used to grab a bag or two when I was raising the redworms.  I would 
tease the workers a bit and tell them I would make coffee with it ... 
"not bad, you just need twice as much for a good cup".
Len

16) From: TERRY TITSWORTH
Who you callin a her?
TerryT
On 7/26/07, CoffeeRoastersClub  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Start HOT and work your way Down...
Peppers AND Coffee.
[|:{O....[|:{U...
(I'm the tall guy in the middle)


HomeRoast Digest