HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Vietnamese Coffee test (30 msgs / 1018 lines)
1) From: Justin Marquez
OK -  I went out at lunchtime to an Asian market not far from the office and
bought a couple of the little drip filter thingies, two different brands of
condensed milk and some Vietnamese coffee which is "robusta and arabica"
coffees.
First I will see if I can successfully make Viet style coffee using pretty
much the same things they used in the restaurant where we like it so well.
Secondly - Assuming I can pass muster on that first test, then I will try my
homeroast in the same setup.
Test #3 will be the Vietnamese ground coffee in the Aeropress and use the
concentrate in place of the drip brew.
Test #4 will be my homeroast in the A/P and use the concentrate in place of
the drip brew. If Test #4 is satisfactory, I will also try a final test with
homeroast decaf.
I probably won't get around to this until Sat or Sunday (and after I come
down off the caffeine rush sometime next week), I'll try to report here the
results.
Hmmmm... I wonder if the Aeropress would drip thru on it's own in about the
right time frame? That would be an easier cleanup than the little metal
filters. I may try this eventually, too.  I'll time the Viet drip and see
how long it normally takes and compare it to the A/P unplunged.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

2) From: Larry Johnson
Sounds fascinating! Can't wait to hear how it comes out.
On 7/25/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Larry J
The greatest pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do.  -
Walter Bagehot

3) From: Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee
You are a brave man, Justin ...
OK -  I went out at lunchtime to an Asian market not far from the 
office and bought a couple of the little drip filter thingies, two 
different brands of condensed milk and some Vietnamese coffee which 
is "robusta and arabica" coffees.
First I will see if I can successfully make Viet style coffee using 
pretty much the same things they used in the restaurant where we like 
it so well.
Secondly - Assuming I can pass muster on that first test, then I will 
try my homeroast in the same setup.
Test #3 will be the Vietnamese ground coffee in the Aeropress and use 
the concentrate in place of the drip brew.
Test #4 will be my homeroast in the A/P and use the concentrate in 
place of the drip brew. If Test #4 is satisfactory, I will also try a 
final test with homeroast decaf.
I probably won't get around to this until Sat or Sunday (and after I 
come down off the caffeine rush sometime next week), I'll try to 
report here the results.
Hmmmm... I wonder if the Aeropress would drip thru on it's own in 
about the right time frame? That would be an easier cleanup than the 
little metal filters. I may try this eventually, too.  I'll time the 
Viet drip and see how long it normally takes and compare it to the 
A/P unplunged.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
--
                   "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"
            Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria
                      http://www.sweetmarias.com                Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com
     Sweet Maria's Coffee - 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA
             phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.com

4) From: Sandy Andina
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Warning--it will not taste the same unless you first put about an  
inch of sweetened condensed milk in the bottom of the cup and then  
drip the coffee in.
On Jul 25, 2007, at 7:21 PM, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Warning--it will not taste the =
same unless you first put about an inch of sweetened condensed milk in =
the bottom of the cup and then drip the coffee in.
On Jul =
25, 2007, at 7:21 PM, Tom & Maria - Sweet Maria's Coffee =
wrote:
You are a brave man, Justin = ... OK -  = I went out at lunchtime to an Asian market not far from the = office and bought a couple of the little drip filter thingies, two = different brands of condensed milk and some Vietnamese coffee which is = "robusta and arabica" coffees. First I will see if I can = successfully make Viet style coffee using pretty much the same things = they used in the restaurant where we like it so well. Secondly = - Assuming I can pass muster on that first test, then I will try my = homeroast in the same setup. Test #3 will be the Vietnamese = ground coffee in the Aeropress and use the concentrate in place of the = drip brew. Test #4 will be my homeroast in the A/P and use the = concentrate in place of the drip brew. If Test #4 is satisfactory, I = will also try a final test with homeroast decaf. I = probably won't get around to this until Sat or Sunday (and after I come = down off the caffeine rush sometime next week), I'll try to report here = the results. Hmmmm... I wonder if the Aeropress would drip thru = on it's own in about the right time frame? That would be an easier = cleanup than the little metal filters. I may try this eventually, = too.  I'll time the Viet = drip and see how long it normally takes and compare it to the A/P = unplunged. Safe Journeys and Sweet MusicJustin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX) --                   = "Great coffee comes from tiny roasters"       =     Sweet Maria's Home Coffee Roasting  -  Tom & Maria        =               http://www.sweetmarias.com      =         Thompson Owen george_at_sweetmarias.com    Sweet Maria's Coffee - = 1115 21st Street, Oakland, CA 94607 - USA            = phone/fax: 888 876 5917 - tom_at_sweetmarias.comhomeroast mailing listhttp://li=sts.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest = options, vacations, unsvbscribes) go to http://=sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-73-954641763--

5) From: Frank Parth
Sandy,
During the two weeks I spent in Saigon recently I never had anything put in the cup before the coffee was made. It 
justdripped into an empty cup.
The pitcher of lukewarm "coffee" on the buffet table was heavy with sweetened condensed milk, but not if I ordered 
coffee at the table.
Since I bought a couple of those drip coffee makers when I was there I'll have to try it different ways just as Justin 
is doing and see if I can reproduce it.
Frank Parth
<Snip>

6) From: dvarona
In my experience those Viet coffee brewers drip quite slowly. I try to re=
member to order the coffee at the beginning of the meal so it can take 20=
 minutes or so to drip through. (It may not be quite that long, but it's =
more than 10 minutes.) The AP I think would drip in about 3 or 4, even wi=
th a very fine grind. However, my grinder won't do an espresso grind so p=
erhaps a finer grind would give you more time than that.
--dv

7) From: CoffeeRoastersClub
Justin,
I have heard of Vietnamese coffee brewing, but have never read about 
the technique used.  How is it generally brewed that distinquishes it 
apart from other types of brewing?
Len

8) From: dvarona
An inch? I think that's too much, unless you're brewing a whole large pot=
. My experience with Vietnamese restaurants is about a tablespoon or so i=
n the bottom of a six-ounce cup. An inch there would be at least two ounc=
es or 4 tbsp, and that sounds off.
I too always have received the condensed-milk-in-the-bottom cup, but I ca=
n imagine that there are aficionados of both. Perhaps in Saigon they give=
 the drinker the option while here they assume our American tastes requir=
e it.
--dv
<Snip>
t in the cup before the coffee was made. It 
<Snip>
etened condensed milk, but not if I ordered 
<Snip>
ll have to try it different ways just as Justin 
<Snip>
h of sweetened condensed milk in the bottom of 
<Snip>
:
<Snip>
ice and bought a couple of the little drip 
<Snip>
tnamese coffee which is "robusta and 
<Snip>
pretty much the same things they used in the 
<Snip>
l try my homeroast in the same setup.
<Snip>
e the concentrate in place of the drip brew.
<Snip>
lace of the drip brew. If Test #4 is 
<Snip>
 come down off the caffeine rush sometime next 
<Snip>
out the right time frame? That would be an 
<Snip>
lly, too. I'll time the Viet drip and see 
<Snip>
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s.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast
<Snip>
svbscribes) go to 
<Snip>
eetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
<Snip>
scribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

9) From: dvarona
It uses a dark roast of some kind; I can't say what kind of coffee is use=
d, whether it varies much or there is a Special Vietnamese Style (like Th=
ai tea). Hot water is poured into a special brewing dripper that sits on =
the top of the cup. The brewer holds the grounds between two perforated p=
lates. The hot water drips through very slowly; in my experience it takes=
 about 15 minutes for 6oz. If I were to guess how hot the water is, I'd s=
ay about 175F or so.
You often get extra hot water to either dilute the resulting brew, or to =
extract more from the grounds. In recent years I've been getting the extr=
a water in a little glass-lined thermos. And often condensed milk is alre=
ady in the bottom of the cup when you get it. After the brew is finished,=
 you stir the milk from the bottom and get a unique taste experience. 
Unfortunately I've never taken the opportunity to try it black, so I can'=
t say how it really differs from other brewing styles.
<Snip>
scribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings<Snip>

10) From: Justin Marquez
I made some last night at home as a first test. It worked very well - tasted
just like the result from our favorite Vietnamese restaurant here in Houston
area (Kim Kim is it's name, at Hwy 6 and US 290, in case any other
Houstonians are monitoring this channel). SWMBO and I agreed - we have
duplicated it. The Vietnamese coffee I bought was a blend of robusta and
arabica.  It had chocolately fragrance dry and after pouring it all over the
crushed ice, you'd SWEAR there was chocolate in there with the coffee.
 You use a small drip apparatus which has built-in metal filters. There is a
filter on the bottom and a similar screen on the top.  You put 20 gr grounds
in the filter, moisten with about 20 ml boiling water and put it on top of a
cup. Then put the screen on top and add another 45 ml boiling water. Then
you wait about 5-10 minutes (haven't timed it yet - seems like FOREVER, but
probably is about 5 minutes).  After all the dripping has done, add
sweetened condensed milk to the drip brew, mix and pour over crushed ice.
Wickedly good.
The instructions were on the bag for the coffee and they worked fine.
The little drip/press thingies cost $2.99 each. The *Trung Nguyen* brand
coffee cost about $4 for 500 grams. The condensed milk I used was branded
"Black and White" and cost $1.09 for 14 oz.  These were the brands used at
Kim Kim.
I would guess that in great part the coffee itself may be crucial, but I
will be testing that over the next few days. Another factor may be the
relatively long extraction time. I will also be testing that as well.
The Thai Iced coffee video was a very short extraction time, but I have
never had it that way, so I don't know if it tastes the same (CHOCOLATE!) or
not.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/26/07, CoffeeRoastersClub  wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Angelo
The first time I had Vietnamese coffee was here in Manhattan. I had 
no idea of what it was supposed to be like.
They brought out the cup with the apparatus on top, and  I waited 
until it dripped through. I took a sip and called the waiter over and 
told him I couldn't take it black and could he bring some sugar.
He smiled, took my spoon and began stirring the coffee. Lo, and 
behold! The black coffee turned brown. I felt a bit stupid (not the 
first, or last time). It was delicious.
I asked what coffee they used. He brought out the can. It was Caffe 
Du Monde w/chicory. In about five different Vietnamese restaurants 
I've eaten in, every time I ask the brand of coffee, they bring out 
the same can...Caffe Du Monde
Angelo
<Snip>

12) From: Justin Marquez
The first test - brewing it as best I can to replicate it - worked very
well. I put in a little too much condensed milk, but the right flavor mix
was right there. Linda agreed with me, too. We nailed the taste using the
traditional methods and materials.
More test results to follow.  I can't drink too much of that stuff at night
and I am really hard pressed to throw out a great flavored cup.  Even if I
had the taste buds for it, I doubt if I could be a real "professional
taster" of anything as I enjoy the good stuff too much to take a taste and
toss the rest!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/25/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>

13) From: Lynne Biziewski
I haven't had either (although the videos on that site make me want to visit
Thailand to try some!), but
you got me interested. We have quite a few Vietnamese restaurants around
here (not directly in the community
where I now live, but closer to Boston). Never checked to see if they have
any on the menu - but I will now.
Lynne
<Snip>

14) From: Justin Marquez
The restaurant where we liked it best used Trung Nguyen brand:http://www.trung-nguyen-online.com/  The Asian market only had their
Robusta and Arabica blend (in a can, in a bag and in a box!).  I bought a
bag of it.
The Asian market where I bought it locally also did have the Cafe Du Monde
brand. They were all about $4 for about a pound.
Cafe Du Monde is the brand they use (and sell) in the New Orleans French
Quarter beignet place of the same name. Isn't it just a US brand?http://www.cafedumonde.com/coffee.htmlI am planning to go back and buy 2 more of the drip thingies, so I'll check
the Cafe Du Monde coffee can label to see where it is made. If I decide from
testing that using homeroasted arabica-only coffee doesn't cut it, then I'll
buy some of the Cafe Du Monde and do a head-to-head test against the Trung
Nguyen brand.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/26/07, Angelo  wrote:
<Snip>

15) From: Justin Marquez
I'll bet they do have it.  If they do, try one - it's totally different
coffee experience.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/26/07, Lynne Biziewski  wrote:
<Snip>

16) From: Sandy Andina
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Saigon is more authentic than Stateside Vietnamese and Thai  
restaurants, so perhaps over here they may be catering to perceived  
Western tastes. BTW, long before Starbucks the Japanese were canning  
espresso drinks--and they were always heavily sweetened and usually  
with milk in some form or another.
On Jul 26, 2007, at 9:02 AM, Frank Parth wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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Saigon is more authentic than =
Stateside Vietnamese and Thai restaurants, so perhaps over here they may =
be catering to perceived Western tastes. BTW, long before Starbucks the =
Japanese were canning espresso drinks--and they were always heavily =
sweetened and usually with milk in some form or another.
On =
Jul 26, 2007, at 9:02 AM, Frank Parth wrote:
Sandy,During the = two weeks I spent in Saigon recently I never had anything put in the cup = before the coffee was made. It justdripped into an empty cup. The = pitcher of lukewarm "coffee" on the buffet table was heavy with = sweetened condensed milk, but not if I ordered coffee at the = table. Since I bought a couple of those drip coffee makers = when I was there I'll have to try it different ways just as Justin is = doing and see if I can reproduce it. Frank = ParthSandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-75-1004577427--

17) From: Sandy Andina
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The Vietnamese restaurants here in Chicago seem to use mostly Cafe du  
Monde.
On Jul 26, 2007, at 10:05 AM, Justin Marquez wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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The Vietnamese restaurants here =
in Chicago seem to use mostly Cafe du Monde.
On Jul 26, =
2007, at 10:05 AM, Justin Marquez wrote:
I = made some last night at home as a first test. It worked very well - = tasted just like the result from our favorite Vietnamese restaurant here = in Houston area (Kim Kim is it's name, at Hwy 6 and US 290, in case = any other Houstonians are monitoring this channel). SWMBO and I agreed - = we have duplicated it. The Vietnamese coffee I bought was a blend of = robusta and arabica.  It had chocolately fragrance dry and after = pouring it all over the crushed ice, you'd SWEAR there was chocolate in = there with the coffee.    You use a small drip = apparatus which has built-in metal filters. There is a filter on the = bottom and a similar screen on the top.  You put 20 gr grounds in the = filter, moisten with about 20 ml boiling water and put it on top of a = cup. Then put the screen on top and add another 45 ml boiling water. = Then you wait about 5-10 minutes (haven't timed it yet - seems like = FOREVER, but probably is about 5 minutes).  After all the dripping has = done, add sweetened condensed milk to the drip brew, mix and pour over = crushed ice.    Wickedly good. =   The instructions were on the bag for the coffee and = they worked fine.   The little drip/press = thingies cost $2.99 each. The Trung Nguyen brand = coffee cost about $4 for 500 grams. The condensed milk I used was = branded "Black and White" and cost $1.09 for 14 oz.  These were the = brands used at Kim Kim.   I would guess that in = great part the coffee itself may be crucial, but I will be testing that = over the next few days. Another factor may be the relatively long = extraction time. I will also be testing that as well.  = The Thai Iced coffee video was a very short extraction time, but I = have never had it that way, so I don't know if it tastes the same = (CHOCOLATE!) or not.   Safe Journeys and Sweet = Music Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)   On 7/26/07, CoffeeRoastersClub <len&= gt; wrote: Justin, I have heard of Vietnamese coffee brewing, but = have never read about the technique used.  How is it generally = brewed that distinquishes it apart from other types of = brewing? Len = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-76-1004681895--

18) From: Justin Marquez
Cafe Du Monda is coffee and chicory. Don't know if the coffee is Arabica or
Robusta.  I went by the Asian market at lunchtime, picked up two more of the
drip filter pots, yet another condensed milk (the once recommended on the
Vietnamese coffee site) and checked the Cafe Du Monde can. It said "Roasted
and Packaged in New orleans, LA" on the can. So, I would find it hard to
believe that in Vietnam they would use it. (Although I am not necessarily
trying to clone what they serve in Vietnam, just what we tasted in Kim Kim
restaurant.)
On 7/26/07, Sandy Andina  wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)

19) From: John Brown
the sweetened condensed cream deal, was what i got in the mid sixties.
along with ice in your beer.  Bom de Bom "33 brand"or Beir La Rue a 
french  export beer or so we were told. neither much good  i was not in 
Saigon,but was in Nah Trang, Vung Tau, Qhon Nagai, Qui Non, Hue, Dong 
Ha, Da Nang,  and a few others i have forgotten. on the whole not good 
memories.
dvarona wrote:
<Snip>

20) From: John Brown
ladies and gentlemen. one should remember that up until
the mid fifties the area was called French IndoChina, for a reason.  
think French colonial cooking and influence.
Sandy Andina wrote:
<Snip>

21) From: raymanowen
It's in here- How-to with pix:
I like the Vietnamese iced coffee at the Pho 88 out on the hard road. Monkey
see, monkey do- I picked up a Vietnamese coffee filter for pocket change at
Tay Do, but I never quite duplicated the brew until I read the directions at
.
The waiter never served the dripping filter/ cup with any instructions on
whether I should tighten the filter assembly at any time. Now, I know- no.
Cheers -RayO, aka Opa!
Got Grinder?

22) From: dvarona
Excellent link. I didn't realize that the screw-play was so important, bu=
t by the time I get it it's always full of water.
Oh, and I am a bit chagrined that I didn't realize the brew contained chi=
cory. That probably contributes more to the difference in flavor experien=
ce than the condensed milk does. I thought it was just dark roast. :"^>
--dv

23) From: Justin Marquez
Update -
Test #2 - Homeroasted in the same Viet setup.  It tasted fine, but wasn't
the definitive flavor. Moving along...
Two of our three children will be coming over tomorrow for lunch. I will try
Test #3 (Viet coffee in the A/P instead of the dip thingie) and will report
results back here sometime afterwards. I will probably try it inverted with
about the same extract time as the drips.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/25/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>

24) From: Justin Marquez
Update -
Test #3 - Vietnamese coffee used in Aeropress.  A reasonable success. I
brewed it alongside of 4 Viet style drippers for family dessert today.  I
put in about 1 and 1/2 A/P scoops of the pre-ground Vietnamese coffee and
let it self drip with the regular A/P paper filter in the bottom.  It
dripped a tiny bit faster than the Viet drippers, but not by much.  The
resulting brew mixed with the condensed milk and poured over ice was
distinguishable in difference, but not by very much.  It would do for me.
Therefore, if you have an A/P and no easy access to the little
Vietnamese-style drip pots, you can have a reasonable facsimile with your
A/P. You will need to use the Vietnamese style coffee, either the
Robusta/Arabica mix or perhaps the Cafe Du Monde with chicory blend.
Straight Arabica homeroast didn't end up with the same distinctive flavor.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/25/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
*  Test #3 will be the Vietnamese ground coffee in the Aeropress and use the
concentrate in place of the drip brew. (WORKED WELL)  *
<Snip>
--

25) From: Justin Marquez
Final Test - I decided to try the A/P inverted, using the Vietnamese
pre-ground coffee.  The results were bitter.
To sum it up - The little Viet style drip pots plus the right coffee make
it easy to get the traditional results.
Using the Aeropress in a similar fashion - filter in the bottom, add the
grounds and letting it drip by itself into the cup over about 5 minutes,
then pressing out the remainder - works nearly as well.  In fact, without
having a traditional setup right next to it for comparison you probably
would not know there was a difference.
Having the right coffee is essential. Straight homeroasted doesn't work.  If
I had some homeroasted Robusta to add to the regular stuff, it might work.
If "someone out there" has homeroasted robusta, please let me know your
results if you test it with the regular roasted.
 Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/29/07, Justin Marquez  wrote:
<Snip>
--

26) From: Woody DeCasere
SM offers chicory right, you could order some and try adding it to the
coffee to see how that went. it would be cool to find a good blend, i might
have to order some good SM robusta to try
On 7/30/07, Justin Marquez < jjmarquez> wrote:
<Snip>
-- 
"And we'd better not risk another frontal assault, that rabbit's dynamite!!"http://www.decasere.blogspot.com/

27) From: Justin Marquez
That's correct.  SM sells both chicory and robusta. And, undoubtedly the
highest quality of both.  I didn't try that because I don't have any of
either on hand and the Asian market with the coffee from Vietnam isn't much
off my regular paths here in the Houston area. If it were not, I probably
would have ordered some from SM to try. If you do, let us know about the
results!
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/30/07, Woody DeCasere  wrote:
<Snip>

28) From: Angelo
Justin,
Did you use the Aeropress with the paper filters supplied? If so, the 
results may be a bit skewed, as the Vietnamese brewers do not use 
paper filters,  allowing more of the oils/flavors of the coffee to 
come through..
Maybe, another test using a cloth or polyester filter on the 
Aeropress might give a truer comparison...
Scott could probably hook you up with a poly filter. I sometimes use 
(extremely) washed out baby wipes (new, of course)... :-)
A
<Snip>

29) From: Sandy Andina
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I've made a passable facsimile of Cafe du Monde coffee by using 3  
parts coarsely ground French Roast Blend or Puro Scuro (either one  
taken to a very dark Vienna or in a melange of Vienna ad French) to 1  
part SM's ground chicory, in a press pot.
On Jul 30, 2007, at 8:22 AM, Woody DeCasere wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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I've made a passable facsimile =
of Cafe du Monde coffee by using 3 parts coarsely ground French Roast =
Blend or Puro Scuro (either one taken to a very dark Vienna or in a =
melange of Vienna ad French) to 1 part SM's ground chicory, in a press =
pot.
On Jul 30, 2007, at 8:22 AM, Woody DeCasere =
wrote:
SM offers chicory right, you could order some and try = adding it to the coffee to see how that went. it would be cool to find a = good blend, i might have to order some good SM robusta to = try On 7/30/07, Justin Marquez < jjmarquez> = wrote:Final Test - I decided to try the A/P inverted, using the = Vietnamese pre-ground coffee.  The results were bitter. =   To sum it up - The little Viet style drip pots plus = the right coffee make it easy to get the traditional results. =   Using the Aeropress in a similar fashion - filter in = the bottom, add the grounds and letting it drip by itself into the = cup over about 5 minutes, then pressing out the remainder - works = nearly as well.  In fact, without having a traditional setup right = next to it for comparison you probably would not know there was a = difference.   Having the right coffee is = essential. Straight homeroasted doesn't work.  If I had some = homeroasted Robusta to add to the regular stuff, it might work.  If = "someone out there" has homeroasted robusta, please let me know your = results if you test it with the regular roasted. =    Safe Journeys and Sweet Music Justin Marquez = (CYPRESS, TX)   On 7/29/07, Justin = Marquez <jjmarquez > = wrote: Update -   Test #3 - Vietnamese = coffee used in Aeropress.  A reasonable success. I brewed it alongside = of 4 Viet style drippers for family dessert today.  I put in about 1 = and 1/2 A/P scoops of the pre-ground Vietnamese coffee and let it self = drip with the regular A/P paper filter in the bottom.  It dripped a = tiny bit faster than the Viet drippers, but not by much.  The = resulting brew mixed with the condensed milk and poured over ice was = distinguishable in difference, but not by very much.  It would do for = me. Therefore, if you have an A/P and no easy access to the little = Vietnamese-style drip pots, you can have a reasonable facsimile with = your A/P. You will need to use the Vietnamese style coffee, either the = Robusta/Arabica mix or perhaps the Cafe Du Monde with chicory blend. = Straight Arabica homeroast didn't end up with the same distinctive = flavor. Safe Journeys and Sweet Music Justin = Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)   On 7/25/07, Justin = Marquez <jjmarquez > = wrote: OK -  I went out at lunchtime = to an Asian market not far from the office and bought a couple of the = little drip filter thingies, two different brands of condensed milk and = some Vietnamese coffee which is "robusta and arabica" coffees. =   First I will = see if I can successfully make Viet style coffee using pretty much the = same things they used in the restaurant where we like it so well. = (WORKED VERY WELL)    Secondly - Assuming I can pass muster on that first = test, then I will try my homeroast in the same setup. (NOPE)  =     Test #3 will be = the Vietnamese ground coffee in the Aeropress and use the concentrate in = place of the drip brew. (WORKED WELL)  =   Test #4 will be my = homeroast in the A/P and use the concentrate in place of the drip brew. = If Test #4 is satisfactory, I will also try a final test with homeroast = decaf. (Abandoned) =     Safe Journeys and = Sweet Music Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX) =
-- =
-- =
-- "And we'd better not = risk another frontal assault, that rabbit's dynamite!!" =http://www.decasere.blogspot.com/ Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-130--789558656--

30) From: Justin Marquez
It worked just fine with the A/P-supplied paper filters when I just set the
A/P on top of the cup and let it drip down via gravity (like the little Viet
pots do). It didn't taste exactly the same as one of the traditional
drippers, but the difference was very minor.  Without a traditional version
to head-to-head cup against it, I would not have thought it different at all
- it tasted like I remembered it, even when I had the "real thing" just the
day before. Side-by-side, it wasn't quite a chocolatey tasting. It also was
not quite as dark an extraction as the traditional, as the A/P did drip
slightly faster at first, then slower at the end.  After about 4-5 minutes,
I pressed it on out.
When I tried an inverted for 5 minutes, it got really bitter. I doubt it was
a filter material issue.  Maybe a shorter extraction time.  I will probably
try that later.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/30/07, Angelo  wrote:
<Snip>


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