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Topic: Pre-heating drum (6 msgs / 208 lines)
1) From: Mike Koenig
I recently finished my home-built "cheapo" drum roaster, made mostly
from scrounged parts.  Thanks to everyone who gave input to my past
questions.  (I'll link to pictures, as soon as I put them somewhere).
It's made from a stainless steel canister (not perforated at all),
with aluminum flashing as stirring vanes, and a cone on the end (also
made of flashing).
Since the end is open, I can stick a thermocouple in, and measure the
temperature inside the drum (it will take some more tweaking to get it
immersed in the beans).  It seems to take FOREVER to heat up, almost
10 minutes to get the internal drum temperature to the ~300 F range,
and I don't get to first crack until about 20 minutes.
I know there are a few others out there that are using solid metal
drums.  Do you find you need to pre-heat the drum??  (I'm using a 36K
BTU Weber as my grill.)
I'm thinking about perforating the sides with some holes to help heat
transfer into the drum.  Anyone have any ideas whether this will help?
(my theory is that I'll get some convection into the drum, rather than
just relying on conduction through the metal)
Thanks in advance
--mike

2) From: Tom Ulmer
I always pre-heat the drum to 450-500F before I start roasting. The =
drum
rides in or very near the flame as it rotates at 10 RPM. The drum size
limits the volume of greens to 12-15 ounces. First crack can be =
manipulated
to occur from eight to fifteen minutes easily using a crudely modified
12,000 BTU table top gas grill with even results.

3) From: Oaxaca Charly
Mike Koenig  wrote: I recently finished my home-built "cheapo" drum roaster, made mostly
from scrounged parts.  Thanks to everyone who gave input to my past
questions.  (I'll link to pictures, as soon as I put them somewhere).
It's made from a stainless steel canister (not perforated at all),
with aluminum flashing as stirring vanes, and a cone on the end (also
made of flashing).
Since the end is open, I can stick a thermocouple in, and measure the
temperature inside the drum (it will take some more tweaking to get it
immersed in the beans).  It seems to take FOREVER to heat up, almost
10 minutes to get the internal drum temperature to the ~300 F range,
and I don't get to first crack until about 20 minutes.
I know there are a few others out there that are using solid metal
drums.  Do you find you need to pre-heat the drum??  (I'm using a 36K
BTU Weber as my grill.)
 I only pre -heat my RK drum in the winter, when it's mighty cold on my porch. I just place it on top of the grill while the grill is warming up, stabilized by the needle nose pliers that I use to pull the pin from the drum at the end of the roast.
I'm thinking about perforating the sides with some holes to help heat
transfer into the drum.  Anyone have any ideas whether this will help?
(my theory is that I'll get some convection into the drum, rather than
just relying on conduction through the metal)
 It will probably help, but wow, drilling all those holes after the metal is bent and the drum made...? good luck with that. You'll get a roasting dynamic that's a little like drum roasting/hot air roasting combined. I like it.  You may want to experiment with insulating your grill, too.
Thanks in advance
 de nada,
 Charly
---------------------------------
Moody friends. Drama queens. Your life? Nope! - their life, your story.
 Play Sims Stories at Yahoo! Games. 

4) From: Jim De Hoog
Mike,
I have to pre-heat my drum when I am roasting 2 pounds in my "ice bucket roaster".  My drum sits an inch or so from the burner of the grill.    If I am roasting 2 pounds, the gas valve is at the lighting position until it hits first crack. For a 1 pound roast, I set my gas valve at the pre-heat/lighting mode then reduce the flow to a little above high. I will pre-heat my grill to 600 degrees without my drum in it.
Are you pre-heating your grill?
Jim "Ice Bucket Roaster" De Hoog
----- Original Message ----
From: Mike Koenig 
To: homeroast 
Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2007 2:34:05 PM
Subject: +Pre-heating drum
I recently finished my home-built "cheapo" drum roaster, made mostly
from scrounged parts.  Thanks to everyone who gave input to my past
questions.  (I'll link to pictures, as soon as I put them somewhere).
It's made from a stainless steel canister (not perforated at all),
with aluminum flashing as stirring vanes, and a cone on the end (also
made of flashing).
Since the end is open, I can stick a thermocouple in, and measure the
temperature inside the drum (it will take some more tweaking to get it
immersed in the beans).  It seems to take FOREVER to heat up, almost
10 minutes to get the internal drum temperature to the ~300 F range,
and I don't get to first crack until about 20 minutes.
I know there are a few others out there that are using solid metal
drums.  Do you find you need to pre-heat the drum??  (I'm using a 36K
BTU Weber as my grill.)
I'm thinking about perforating the sides with some holes to help heat
transfer into the drum.  Anyone have any ideas whether this will help?
(my theory is that I'll get some convection into the drum, rather than
just relying on conduction through the metal)
Thanks in advance
--mike

5) From: Mike Koenig
I am pre-heating the grill - it gets to about ~650 F where my
thermocouple sits (before I put in the drum) after about 15 minutes.
I'll try my next batch with a pre-heat and see where it takes me.  My
guess is that this drum has quite a bit more heat capacity than
something like the RK, and thefore takes quite a bit longer to heat up
inside. The walls are fairly thick (which makes drilling obnoxious,
hence the lack of perforations at the moment).
--mike
On 7/26/07, Jim De Hoog  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Homeroaster
Preheat it and see if that makes a difference.  Remove the barrier between 
the flame and the drum.  It's not that critical with a solid-walled drum, 
and saves time and propane.
With a 1-2 pound load in my solid-walled stainless drum, I prefer to hit 
first crack somewhere around 13 minutes, and finish at around 16 or so.
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"http://www.homeroaster.com*********************


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