HomeRoast Digest


Topic: messed up - froze beans (12 msgs / 736 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
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Okay, I really messed up, I think.  I have been trying different ways 
of doing things that I read about in various books, mostly Home 
Roasting Coffee - Romance and Revival.
While my machine, an IR2, has a cooling cycle, I like to try the 
different cooling methods or quenching.  So, when the cooling cycle 
starts, unless I am letting it do the first phase of the cooling, 
then having me put the beans in a colander where I finish cooling 
them, I stop the cycle and try some of the methods I have read 
about.  I want to take in as much as I can, find the how the flavor 
may or may not differ with different methods, all while really just having fun.
Off Topic for a moment: In one post someone discussed how many of our 
grandparents roasted beans on the porch or where ever in the 
evenings; sort of a ritual.  I am doing that with my neighbors, two 
who have ordered books, been on this sight, placed orders and also 
come over when I roast.  We want it to be like a block party, a 
social event at times.
On topic: One method in the book mentioned putting the beans in the 
freezer for a short period of time.  Well, last night I wanted to get 
a roast in before going to the movies.  I roasted the last of my 
Rwanda Butare Bourbon, a forgiving bean I have been told.
I totally forgot about it until I went to make coffee this 
morning.  There it was, still in the freezer.  Luckily, I had some of 
the Nicaragua Placeras Estate Miel I had roasted the other night.  My 
best roast so far.  I made it, it was really, really good and I 
promise, I don't mean to brag.
I didn't take out the Rwanda roast for I didn't know if I should thaw 
it and grind it, grind it frozen, or toss it.  I don't want it to get 
moldy, which thawing may do.
Any ideas?  Guess you can tell, still a new comer to all of this.  I 
don't mind tossing it if that is best, for the freezing seems like it 
would be harsh to the beans.  I also don't mind roasting it to taste 
the effects of the freeze, but if is going to be just plain bad, I 
guess I should toss it.
What would you comment?  Thank you for your help.  Hey, the movie, 
Hair Spray, was at least fun. 
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Okay, I really messed up, I think.  I have been trying different
ways of doing things that I read about in various books, mostly Home
Roasting Coffee - Romance and Revival.  
While my machine, an IR2, has a cooling cycle, I like to try the
different cooling methods or quenching.  So, when the cooling cycle
starts, unless I am letting it do the first phase of the cooling, then
having me put the beans in a colander where I finish cooling them, I stop
the cycle and try some of the methods I have read about.  I want to
take in as much as I can, find the how the flavor may or may not differ
with different methods, all while really just having fun.
Off Topic for a moment: In one post someone discussed how many of our
grandparents roasted beans on the porch or where ever in the evenings;
sort of a ritual.  I am doing that with my neighbors, two who have
ordered books, been on this sight, placed orders and also come over when
I roast.  We want it to be like a block party, a social event at
times.
On topic: One method in the book mentioned putting the beans in the
freezer for a short period of time.  Well, last night I wanted to
get a roast in before going to the movies.  I roasted the last of my
Rwanda Butare Bourbon, a forgiving bean I have been told.
I totally forgot about it until I went to make coffee this morning. 
There it was, still in the freezer.  Luckily, I had some of the
Nicaragua Placeras Estate Miel I had roasted the other night.  My
best roast so far.  I made it, it was really, really good and I
promise, I don't mean to brag.
I didn't take out the Rwanda roast for I didn't know if I should thaw it
and grind it, grind it frozen, or toss it.  I don't want it to get
moldy, which thawing may do.  
Any ideas?  Guess you can tell, still a new comer to all of
this.  I don't mind tossing it if that is best, for the freezing
seems like it would be harsh to the beans.  I also don't mind
roasting it to taste the effects of the freeze, but if is going to be
just plain bad, I guess I should toss it.
What would you comment?  Thank you for your help.  Hey, the
movie, Hair Spray, was at least fun.
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2) From: Les
Personally,
I would first pause and remember all the hardwork that went into picking,
processesing, sorting, cleaning and getting those wonderful gems all the way
from Rwanda!  Second, I wouldn't worry too much!  If you have a good
grinder, you should be able to grind them frozen without a problem.
Personally, I have gone straight from the freezer to the grinder.  I have
roasted too much coffee before leaving on vacation and freezing is a good
method to extend the freshness.  I wouldn't thaw them first.
You are worrying too much.  At least you know it will taste better than
freeze dryed Foldgers!
Les
On 7/27/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>

3) From: Stephen Carey
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Point made, thank you.  I don't feel like such a dork now.
At 10:33 AM 7/27/2007, you wrote:
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Point made, thank you.  I don't feel like such a dork
now.
At 10:33 AM 7/27/2007, you wrote:
Personally,
I would first pause and remember all the hardwork that went into picking,
processesing, sorting, cleaning and getting those wonderful gems all the
way from Rwanda!  Second, I wouldn't worry too much!  If you
have a good grinder, you should be able to grind them frozen without a
problem.  Personally, I have gone straight from the freezer to the
grinder.  I have roasted too much coffee before leaving on vacation
and freezing is a good method to extend the freshness.  I wouldn't
thaw them first. 
You are worrying too much.  At least you know it will taste better
than freeze dryed Foldgers!
Les
 
On 7/27/07, Stephen Carey
<steve
> wrote: 
Okay, I really messed up, I think.  I have been trying different
ways of doing things that I read about in various books, mostly Home
Roasting Coffee - Romance and Revival.  
While my machine, an IR2, has a cooling cycle, I like to try the
different cooling methods or quenching.  So, when the cooling cycle
starts, unless I am letting it do the first phase of the cooling, then
having me put the beans in a colander where I finish cooling them, I stop
the cycle and try some of the methods I have read about.  I want to
take in as much as I can, find the how the flavor may or may not differ
with different methods, all while really just having fun. 
Off Topic for a moment: In one post someone discussed how many of our
grandparents roasted beans on the porch or where ever in the evenings;
sort of a ritual.  I am doing that with my neighbors, two who have
ordered books, been on this sight, placed orders and also come over when
I roast.  We want it to be like a block party, a social event at
times. 
On topic: One method in the book mentioned putting the beans in the
freezer for a short period of time.  Well, last night I wanted to
get a roast in before going to the movies.  I roasted the last of my
Rwanda Butare Bourbon, a forgiving bean I have been told. 
I totally forgot about it until I went to make coffee this
morning.  There it was, still in the freezer.  Luckily, I had
some of the Nicaragua Placeras Estate Miel I had roasted the other
night.  My best roast so far.  I made it, it was really, really
good and I promise, I don't mean to brag. 
I didn't take out the Rwanda roast for I didn't know if I should thaw
it and grind it, grind it frozen, or toss it.  I don't want it to
get moldy, which thawing may do.  
Any ideas?  Guess you can tell, still a new comer to all of
this.  I don't mind tossing it if that is best, for the freezing
seems like it would be harsh to the beans.  I also don't mind
roasting it to taste the effects of the freeze, but if is going to be
just plain bad, I guess I should toss it. 
What would you comment?  Thank you for your help.  Hey, the
movie, Hair Spray, was at least fun.
--=====================_92300796==.ALT--

4) From: Jason Brooks
<Snip>
I would be a bit hesitant of putting hot beans in a freezer with food
therein.  If you had one dedicated to beans, it might be better.  It's not
likely enough (one batch) to cause problems, but it will, at a minimum,
but an increased load on the freezer.  Do you know the temp of the beans
when they went to the chill chest?
Side note - we cool everything before putting in the freezer or fridge for
food safety.  Like I said - if your freezer is good and cold, everything
frozen, you're probably fine.
Jason
-- 
Jason Brooks
jbrookshttp://javajeb.wordpress.com

5) From: Stephen Carey
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I don't know the temperature, but I do know that I still pour them 
into a colander, move them around a bit, then I put them in the 
freeze.  It is a super fast freezer, ice trays take no time at 
all.  The roast ended at 435 for 30 seconds, up from 400 for 400 for 
4 minutes, I am betting that by the time I made it to the freeze they 
were not hot, but warm, I could certainly touch them for I pulled one 
out for my taste crunch.
Thank you.
At 10:46 AM 7/27/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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I don't know the temperature, but I do know that I still
pour them into a colander, move them around a bit, then I put them in the
freeze.  It is a super fast freezer, ice trays take no time at
all.  The roast ended at 435 for 30 seconds, up from 400 for 400 for
4 minutes, I am betting that by the time I made it to the freeze they
were not hot, but warm, I could certainly touch them for I pulled one out
for my taste crunch.
Thank you.
At 10:46 AM 7/27/2007, you wrote:
<quote who="Stephen
Carey">
> Okay, I really messed up, I think.  I have been trying
different ways
> of doing things that I read about in various books, mostly Home
> Roasting Coffee - Romance and Revival.
>
> While my machine, an IR2, has a cooling cycle, I like to try
the
> different cooling methods or quenching.  So, when the cooling
cycle
> starts, unless I am letting it do the first phase of the
cooling,
> then having me put the beans in a colander where I finish
cooling
> them, I stop the cycle and try some of the methods I have read
> about.  I want to take in as much as I can, find the how the
flavor
> may or may not differ with different methods, all while really just
having
> fun.
>
> Off Topic for a moment: In one post someone discussed how many of
our
> grandparents roasted beans on the porch or where ever in the
> evenings; sort of a ritual.  I am doing that with my neighbors,
two
> who have ordered books, been on this sight, placed orders and
also
> come over when I roast.  We want it to be like a block party,
a
> social event at times.
>
> On topic: One method in the book mentioned putting the beans in
the
> freezer for a short period of time.  Well, last night I wanted
to get
> a roast in before going to the movies.  I roasted the last of
my
> Rwanda Butare Bourbon, a forgiving bean I have been told.
>
> I totally forgot about it until I went to make coffee this
> morning.  There it was, still in the freezer.  Luckily, I
had some of
> the Nicaragua Placeras Estate Miel I had roasted the other
night.  My
> best roast so far.  I made it, it was really, really good and
I
> promise, I don't mean to brag.
>
> I didn't take out the Rwanda roast for I didn't know if I should
thaw
> it and grind it, grind it frozen, or toss it.  I don't want it
to get
> moldy, which thawing may do.
>
> Any ideas?  Guess you can tell, still a new comer to all of
this.  I
> don't mind tossing it if that is best, for the freezing seems like
it
> would be harsh to the beans.  I also don't mind roasting it to
taste
> the effects of the freeze, but if is going to be just plain bad,
I
> guess I should toss it.
>
> What would you comment?  Thank you for your help.  Hey,
the movie,
> Hair Spray, was at least fun.
I would be a bit hesitant of putting hot beans in a freezer with
food
therein.  If you had one dedicated to beans, it might be
better.  It's not
likely enough (one batch) to cause problems, but it will, at a
minimum,
but an increased load on the freezer.  Do you know the temp of the
beans
when they went to the chill chest?
Side note - we cool everything before putting in the freezer or fridge
for
food safety.  Like I said - if your freezer is good and cold,
everything
frozen, you're probably fine.
Jason
-- 
Jason Brooks
jbrooks
http://javajeb.wordpress.comhomeroast mailing list
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6) From: Michael Wade
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Stephen:
For over 20 years I lived in a cabin out in the boonies with no =
electricity but was fortunate to have an old propane refrigerator.  I =
was buying excellent roasted beans from a local roaster and, whether a =
good idea or not by list standards, I kept them in the freezer, my =
theory being that nearly all chemical processes slow down at lower =
temperatures.  The biggest problem I had was that every time I would =
open the container to measure out some beans I would expose the =
remaining beans to warm moist air and some moisture would condense on =
the beans.  Not much, but the effect was cumulative, and toward the end =
of every container the coffee would be noticeably degraded, though not =
as badly as coffee stored at room temperature.  It still beat the pants =
off of canned coffee and I was glad to have it.
You develop processes that suit your lifestyle and circumstances.  I =
don't see any problem with freezing beans, personally, or even measuring =
out one pot's worth and grinding frozen, but not as a regular process.  =
I would recommend allowing them to reach room temperature while still =
sealed in the container.
Michael (another one)

7) From: miKe mcKoffee
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
FWIW the challenge of freezing roast, taking some out and returning to
freezer etc. and the beans picking up accumulated moisture can be eliminated
or at least minimized IMO if vac sealing & freezing. Remove beans from
freezer, take out what you needed for the grind and brew, re-vac the beans
and return to freezer. 
 
Back to running some more Behmor 1# test runs...
 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/ 
From: homeroast-admin
[mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of Michael Wade
Sent: Friday, July 27, 2007 8:55 AM
Stephen:
 
For over 20 years I lived in a cabin out in the boonies with no electricity
but was fortunate to have an old propane refrigerator.  I was buying
excellent roasted beans from a local roaster and, whether a good idea or not
by list standards, I kept them in the freezer, my theory being that nearly
all chemical processes slow down at lower temperatures.  The biggest problem
I had was that every time I would open the container to measure out some
beans I would expose the remaining beans to warm moist air and some moisture
would condense on the beans.  Not much, but the effect was cumulative, and
toward the end of every container the coffee would be noticeably degraded,
though not as badly as coffee stored at room temperature.  It still beat the
pants off of canned coffee and I was glad to have it.
 
You develop processes that suit your lifestyle and circumstances.  I don't
see any problem with freezing beans, personally, or even measuring out one
pot's worth and grinding frozen, but not as a regular process.  I would
recommend allowing them to reach room temperature while still sealed in the
container.
 
Michael (another one)
 

8) From: Sandy Andina
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Or freeze individual portions.
On Jul 27, 2007, at 11:20 AM, miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>
Sandy Andina
www.sandyandina.com
www.myspace.com/sandyandina
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	charsetO-8859-1
Or freeze individual =
portions.
On Jul 27, 2007, at 11:20 AM, miKe mcKoffee =
wrote:
FWIW the challenge of freezing roast, taking = some out and returning to freezer etc. and the beans picking up = accumulated moisture can be eliminated or at least minimized IMO if vac = sealing & freezing. Remove beans from freezer, take out what you = needed for the grind and brew, re-vac the beans and return to = freezer.Back to running some = more Behmor 1# test runs...

Pacific Northwest = Gathering VI

Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, =">http://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htm=="=" style="3D"font-size:" 13px;="13px;" text-align:="text-align:" -khtml-left;="-khtml-left;" "=""">
Kona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, = FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:
Ultimately the =">http://www.mckoffee.com/style="3D"font-size:" =="=" 13px;="13px;" text-align:="text-align:" -khtml-left;="-khtml-left;" "=""">Ultimately the = quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must first not = know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment found = exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone = before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archives

homeroast-admin= s.sweetmarias.com [mailto:homeroast-adm= in] On Behalf Of = Michael = Wade
Friday, July 27, = 2007 8:55 AM

   Michael (another one) <= BR class="Apple-interchange-newline"> = Sandy = Andinawww.sandyandina.comwww.myspace.com/sandyandina=

= = --Apple-Mail-84--1054170211--

9) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This has brought up an interesting idea going srtraight from the roaster
to cooler to freezer 
Was it MM that did the freezer test on beans? Did he cover this thougth
too?
(I can't search the acrhives underway due to internet restrictions)
Dennis

10) From: miKe mcKoffee
Michael Sivetz has been a proponent of exactly that commercially for many
years.
MM test this? Who knows! Done so many vac room temp, vac & freeze, long term
multi-year greens vac storage, vac & freeze greens (more testing needed),
vac versus co2 scrubber added vac'd versus valve bag versus zip lock roast
storage, same time same finish temp different profiles etc tests the past 6+
years home roasting it's a distinct possibility:-) I can say with 99.999%
certainty that freezing roasts at home freezer temperatures around -10 to 0f
extremely slows degassing and staling. Michael Sivetz believes freezing down
around -40f 100% ceases it. My norm is not to go directly from roast cooling
to vac freezing.  Though recently I have started doing that a bit do to
copious roasting of prime greens with the Behmor before getting the 40# of
test greens:-)
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Konnaisseur miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>

11) From: John Brown
or repackage to what you need for each brewing
miKe mcKoffee wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: miKe mcKoffee
That would mean always packaging for one double shot in many very small vac
bags since never know if session would be for one or more pulls. Very doable
but very time consuming and bag material consuming. I prefer using
resealable washable reusable mason jars and dome lids measuring out what's
just needed each time, immediately re-vac dome lid and back to the freezer.
Over one year mason jar vac frozen already 9 day room temp rested meaning on
the tail end before freezing with a few openings and re-vac and freezing
along the way yielding great taste and 75 to 80% crema shots enough evidence
for me it works quite well. 
Pacific Northwest Gathering VIhttp://home.comcast.net/~mckona/PNWGVI.htmKona Kurmudgeon miKe mcKoffee
URL to Rosto mods, FrankenFormer, some recipes etc:http://www.mckoffee.com/Ultimately the quest for Koffee Nirvana is a solitary path. To know I must
first not know. And in knowing know I know not. Each Personal enlightenment
found exploring the many divergent foot steps of Those who have gone before.
Sweet Maria's List - Searchable Archiveshttp://themeyers.org/HomeRoast/
<Snip>
<Snip>


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