HomeRoast Digest


Topic: Shame on Me! (13 msgs / 820 lines)
1) From: Les
We have an annual picnic for our book club and part of the desert
ritual is coffee.  I bring 4 thermoses full of good homeroast most of
the time.  I went out to pick what to brew yesterday afternoon, and I
was upset that the only two coffees roasted was the last of the Puro
Scuro Blend and some Brazil Yellow Bourbon.  Both are at their prime
and I didn't want to "throw my pearls before the swine" again!  As I
was prepping the grinder for 6 back to back TV brews, I picked up an
old Yogurt container and behold I heard the rattle of roasted beans!
I popped the top off and behold the smell of Harar Horse lot 30!  I
figured I roasted those beans around the 5th of May and just forgot to
put them in the care-package for my daughter and son-in-law when we
went to Idaho.  I vacillated for about 10 seconds, "Should I?"  "Yup!"
 I ground it up and brewed a pot.  I took a test sip and yes it was
Horse and yes it was stale!  Oh well.  Now for the smirk and
disappointment at the same time!  Everyone LOVED IT!  I could stomach
about half a cup.  It was gone gone gone and people were ranting and
raving about it being the best ever!  So for the average person, there
needs to be an added cupping score labeled "staleness."  So the good
thing is all the hard work of the folks in Ethiopia didn't go in the
trash without being brewed and I am enjoying my Puro Scuro this
morning as I type.  I am also a bit heart broken to think how ignorant
people can be.
Les

2) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_189307328==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
Les, glad you had some beans on hand.  I think a few things go into 
the people liking it.  Some is just what you state, they don't know 
better.  Some is the environment, if they are having a good time they 
will find food and drink more pleasing - I got that from my old 
sociology classes.  They are caught up in the good time.
Plus, there is the factor that you brought it and they like you, they 
won't tell you it is bad or stale.  If they knew you roasted it all 
the more likely they will complement it.
Who knows what they said in the car when they left.
What counts is you were kind enough to share your beans and talents 
with them, that will improve a cup any day.  Or, they just have no 
taste, I like thinking the other way.  Just me.
At 01:23 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_189307328==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Les, glad you had some beans on hand.  I think a few
things go into the people liking it.  Some is just what you state,
they don't know better.  Some is the environment, if they are having
a good time they will find food and drink more pleasing - I got that from
my old sociology classes.  They are caught up in the good
time.
Plus, there is the factor that you brought it and they like you, they
won't tell you it is bad or stale.  If they knew you roasted it all
the more likely they will complement it.
Who knows what they said in the car when they left.
What counts is you were kind enough to share your beans and talents with
them, that will improve a cup any day.  Or, they just have no taste,
I like thinking the other way.  Just me.
At 01:23 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
We have an annual picnic for our
book club and part of the desert
ritual is coffee.  I bring 4 thermoses full of good homeroast most
of
the time.  I went out to pick what to brew yesterday afternoon, and
I
was upset that the only two coffees roasted was the last of the Puro
Scuro Blend and some Brazil Yellow Bourbon.  Both are at their
prime
and I didn't want to "throw my pearls before the swine"
again!  As I
was prepping the grinder for 6 back to back TV brews, I picked up an
old Yogurt container and behold I heard the rattle of roasted beans!
I popped the top off and behold the smell of Harar Horse lot 30! 
I
figured I roasted those beans around the 5th of May and just forgot
to
put them in the care-package for my daughter and son-in-law when we
went to Idaho.  I vacillated for about 10 seconds, "Should
I?"  "Yup!"
 I ground it up and brewed a pot.  I took a test sip and yes it
was
Horse and yes it was stale!  Oh well.  Now for the smirk
and
disappointment at the same time!  Everyone LOVED IT!  I could
stomach
about half a cup.  It was gone gone gone and people were ranting
and
raving about it being the best ever!  So for the average person,
there
needs to be an added cupping score labeled "staleness." 
So the good
thing is all the hard work of the folks in Ethiopia didn't go in the
trash without being brewed and I am enjoying my Puro Scuro this
morning as I type.  I am also a bit heart broken to think how
ignorant
people can be.
Les
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_189307328==.ALT--

3) From: Andy Thomas
Steve, I think what you say about context is certainly true. I am thinking =
about some of the truly horrible things I've eaten while camping that I tho=
ught were wonderful at the time. Besides, the stale Harar probably was much=
 better -- and also less stale -- than the coffee Les' guests usually drink=
 at home.
----- Original Message ----
From: Stephen Carey 
To: homeroast
Sent: Saturday, July=
 28, 2007 10:42:12 AM
Subject: Re: +Shame on Me!
Les, glad you=
 had some beans on hand.  I think a few
things go into the people liking =
it.  Some is just what you state,
they don't know better.  Some is the en=
vironment, if they are having
a good time they will find food and drink m=
ore pleasing - I got that from
my old sociology classes.  They are caught=
 up in the good
time.
Plus, there is the factor that you brought =
it and they like you, they
won't tell you it is bad or stale.  If they kn=
ew you roasted it all
the more likely they will complement it.
Wh=
o knows what they said in the car when they left.
What counts is yo=
u were kind enough to share your beans and talents with
them, that will i=
mprove a cup any day.  Or, they just have no taste,
I like thinking the o=
ther way.  Just me.
At 01:23 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
We=
 have an annual picnic for our
book club and part of the desert
ritu=
al is coffee.  I bring 4 thermoses full of good homeroast most
of
th=
e time.  I went out to pick what to brew yesterday afternoon, and
I
=
was upset that the only two coffees roasted was the last of the Puro
S=
curo Blend and some Brazil Yellow Bourbon.  Both are at their
prime
=
and I didn't want to "throw my pearls before the swine"
again!  As I
=
was prepping the grinder for 6 back to back TV brews, I picked up an
=
old Yogurt container and behold I heard the rattle of roasted beans!
=
I popped the top off and behold the smell of Harar Horse lot 30! 
I
=
figured I roasted those beans around the 5th of May and just forgot
to=
put them in the care-package for my daughter and son-in-law when we=
went to Idaho.  I vacillated for about 10 seconds, "Should
I?"  "Yu=
p!"
 I ground it up and brewed a pot.  I took a test sip and yes it
=
was
Horse and yes it was stale!  Oh well.  Now for the smirk
and
=
disappointment at the same time!  Everyone LOVED IT!  I could
stomach=
about half a cup.  It was gone gone gone and people were ranting
an=
d
raving about it being the best ever!  So for the average person,
t=
here
needs to be an added cupping score labeled "staleness." 
So the=
 good
thing is all the hard work of the folks in Ethiopia didn't go in=
 the
trash without being brewed and I am enjoying my Puro Scuro this=
morning as I type.  I am also a bit heart broken to think how
ignor=
ant
people can be.
Les=
homeroast mailing listhttp://lists.sweetmarias.=com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast
To change your personal list settings (=
digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go tohttp://sweetmarias.co=m/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings==
_Ready for the edge of your seat? 
Check out tonight's top picks on Yahoo=
! TV. http://tv.yahoo.com/

4) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_201060703==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
Oh, I totally agree.  I am sure it was much better than what comes 
out of most cans.  What I wrote wasn't meant as a slap, just an 
observation.  One I observed when people drank my first roast.  It 
was kind of "flat," if that makes sense.  I got kudos, though.  And, 
for these people it was genuine.  They knew I did something for them, 
we were all having a good time, that sort of thing.  And these people 
know coffee, they haven't had a can of coffee in their house since 
they were out of college.  They, as a group, don't like the chains, 
they like specialty brands and they know the difference.  But the 
situation led them to be kind and to probably taste a coffee that was 
still better than they usually got, certainly more fresh.
Also, what I am learning here is that we are fairly hard on ourselves 
and maybe the coffee was not up to what Les likes to roast, but it 
had to be better than a can of brand anything for 4 dollars a 
pound.  And, I bet it was far better than most of the people there 
are used to drinking.  Though truth be told, there is something we 
all eat that someone else would think is rather pedestrian in nature 
- from beer to bread to pasta.
What I do wonder is how many of those people will now want to roast 
their own or at least buy better brands.  I guess that gets into how 
do we educate people and get them to want the better stuff.  The 
reasons not to are many, from time in the day to children to money to 
"I'd rather spend my money and time on brewing beer."
What I have learned in my short time here is that this is not, or 
doesn't have to be, a massively time consuming effort.  I guess we 
just keep spreading the word.
At 04:38 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_201060703==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Oh, I totally agree.  I am sure it was much better than
what comes out of most cans.  What I wrote wasn't meant as a slap,
just an observation.  One I observed when people drank my first
roast.  It was kind of "flat," if that makes sense. 
I got kudos, though.  And, for these people it was genuine. 
They knew I did something for them, we were all having a good time, that
sort of thing.  And these people know coffee, they haven't had a can
of coffee in their house since they were out of college.  They, as a
group, don't like the chains, they like specialty brands and they know
the difference.  But the situation led them to be kind and to
probably taste a coffee that was still better than they usually got,
certainly more fresh.
Also, what I am learning here is that we are fairly hard on ourselves and
maybe the coffee was not up to what Les likes to roast, but it had to be
better than a can of brand anything for 4 dollars a pound.  And, I
bet it was far better than most of the people there are used to
drinking.  Though truth be told, there is something we all eat that
someone else would think is rather pedestrian in nature - from beer to
bread to pasta.  
What I do wonder is how many of those people will now want to roast their
own or at least buy better brands.  I guess that gets into how do we
educate people and get them to want the better stuff.  The reasons
not to are many, from time in the day to children to money to "I'd
rather spend my money and time on brewing beer."  
What I have learned in my short time here is that this is not, or doesn't
have to be, a massively time consuming effort.  I guess we just keep
spreading the word.
At 04:38 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
Steve, I think what you say
about context is certainly true. I am thinking about some of the truly
horrible things I've eaten while camping that I thought were wonderful at
the time. Besides, the stale Harar probably was much better -- and also
less stale -- than the coffee Les' guests usually drink at home.
----- Original Message ----
From: Stephen Carey <steve>
To: homeroast
Sent: Saturday, July 28, 2007 10:42:12 AM
Subject: Re: +Shame on Me!
Les, glad you had some beans on hand.  I think a few things go into
the people liking it.  Some is just what you state, they don't know
better.  Some is the environment, if they are having a good time
they will find food and drink more pleasing - I got that from my old
sociology classes.  They are caught up in the good time.
Plus, there is the factor that you brought it and they like you, they
won't tell you it is bad or stale.  If they knew you roasted it all
the more likely they will complement it.
Who knows what they said in the car when they left.
What counts is you were kind enough to share your beans and talents with
them, that will improve a cup any day.  Or, they just have no taste,
I like thinking the other way.  Just me.
At 01:23 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
We have an annual picnic for our
book club and part of the desert
ritual is coffee.  I bring 4 thermoses full of good homeroast most
of
the time.  I went out to pick what to brew yesterday afternoon, and
I
was upset that the only two coffees roasted was the last of the Puro
Scuro Blend and some Brazil Yellow Bourbon.  Both are at their
prime
and I didn't want to "throw my pearls before the swine"
again!  As I
was prepping the grinder for 6 back to back TV brews, I picked up an
old Yogurt container and behold I heard the rattle of roasted beans!
I popped the top off and behold the smell of Harar Horse lot 30! 
I
figured I roasted those beans around the 5th of May and just forgot
to
put them in the care-package for my daughter and son-in-law when we
went to Idaho.  I vacillated for about 10 seconds, "Should
I?"  "Yup!"
 I ground it up and brewed a pot.  I took a test sip and yes it
was
Horse and yes it was stale!  Oh well.  Now for the smirk
and
disappointment at the same time!  Everyone LOVED IT!  I could
stomach
about half a cup.  It was gone gone gone and people were ranting
and
raving about it being the best ever!  So for the average person,
there
needs to be an added cupping score labeled "staleness." 
So the good
thing is all the hard work of the folks in Ethiopia didn't go in the
trash without being brewed and I am enjoying my Puro Scuro this
morning as I type.  I am also a bit heart broken to think how
ignorant
people can be.
Les
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings
Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
--=====================_201060703==.ALT--

5) From: Les
You are being a bit kind to my friends.  They speak their minds!  We
have been meeting together for about 10 years.  This was the first Ooh
and Ah session about the homeroast.  They really thought the stale was
better!  Yup, I am convinced for the general public, stale needs to be
a part of the cupping correction!  Generally they think my homeroast
is a cut above the average coffee, but this was over the top praise!
Les
On 7/28/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>

6) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_214160546==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
Les, I think you should bask in the praise, odd as it may be.  I 
guess it is like pasta and gravy (sause), my brothers can't believe 
anyone would buy pasta or gravy - from Prego to the best imported, 
they just don't understand anyone settling for it.  While I will buy 
pasta, I won't buy gravy.  I want the fresh tomatos and peperoni and 
spices (as fresh as possible in there).
It is kind of scarry what people will settle for in coffee.  For that 
could mean that people did really like my first roast as being some 
of the best coffee they had tasted.  Maybe it was, for even in fine 
restaurants the coffee seems to be last on the list to be great or 
even very good.
Do you think some of it is regional or has to do with access?  Though 
access as an issue is going away fast,  actually, has gone away.
Maybe here in the States coffee, for some, is just a habit that 
happens at the end of dinner and in the morning.  God, I hate to 
think that, but it may be.  I know my mother had her sister-in-law 
call her a snob because she buys freshly roasted coffee and uses a 
French Press.  My sister-in-law also called me one because I set out 
two forks at a nice dinner.  Go figure.
What I don't know is if the roasting of our own coffee or the buying 
of the better coffee is growing or in our busy world just isn't 
important to others.  The other thought on this is that I don't want 
to judge my friends by the coffee they drink as long as they don't 
judge me by the fact that I am now roasting my coffee.
Heck, there is a noticeable difference in jeans that cost $200 and 
those that cost $45 - at least in most cases.  I don't want to be one 
of those people who judge others because they buy the more expensive 
ones or don't.  I guess it comes down to live and let live, but, for 
me, at the same time try to get others interested in roasting.  It 
kind of feels lonely, for none of my friends do it, though, one is 
very interested.
Sorry, I rambled there.
Have a good night.
At 08:06 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_214160546==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Les, I think you should bask in the praise, odd as it may
be.  I guess it is like pasta and gravy (sause), my brothers can't
believe anyone would buy pasta or gravy - from Prego to the best
imported, they just don't understand anyone settling for it.  While
I will buy pasta, I won't buy gravy.  I want the fresh tomatos and
peperoni and spices (as fresh as possible in there).
It is kind of scarry what people will settle for in coffee.  For
that could mean that people did really like my first roast as being some
of the best coffee they had tasted.  Maybe it was, for even in fine
restaurants the coffee seems to be last on the list to be great or even
very good.  
Do you think some of it is regional or has to do with access? 
Though access as an issue is going away fast,  actually, has gone
away.
Maybe here in the States coffee, for some, is just a habit that happens
at the end of dinner and in the morning.  God, I hate to think that,
but it may be.  I know my mother had her sister-in-law call her a
snob because she buys freshly roasted coffee and uses a French
Press.  My sister-in-law also called me one because I set out two
forks at a nice dinner.  Go figure.
What I don't know is if the roasting of our own coffee or the buying of
the better coffee is growing or in our busy world just isn't important to
others.  The other thought on this is that I don't want to judge my
friends by the coffee they drink as long as they don't judge me by the
fact that I am now roasting my coffee.  
Heck, there is a noticeable difference in jeans that cost $200 and those
that cost $45 - at least in most cases.  I don't want to be one of
those people who judge others because they buy the more expensive ones or
don't.  I guess it comes down to live and let live, but, for me, at
the same time try to get others interested in roasting.  It kind of
feels lonely, for none of my friends do it, though, one is very
interested.  
Sorry, I rambled there.  
Have a good night. 
At 08:06 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
You are being a bit kind to my
friends.  They speak their minds!  We
have been meeting together for about 10 years.  This was the first
Ooh
and Ah session about the homeroast.  They really thought the stale
was
better!  Yup, I am convinced for the general public, stale needs to
be
a part of the cupping correction!  Generally they think my
homeroast
is a cut above the average coffee, but this was over the top
praise!
Les
On 7/28/07, Stephen Carey <steve> wrote:
>
>  Oh, I totally agree.  I am sure it was much better than
what comes out of
> most cans. What I wrote wasn't meant as a slap, just an
observation.  One I
> observed when people drank my first roast.  It was kind of
"flat," if that
> makes sense.  I got kudos, though.  And, for these people
it was genuine.
> They knew I did something for them, we were all having a good time,
that
> sort of thing.  And these people know coffee, they haven't had
a can of
> coffee in their house since they were out of college.  They, as
a group,
> don't like the chains, they like specialty brands and they know
the
> difference.  But the situation led them to be kind and to
probably taste a
> coffee that was still better than they usually got, certainly more
fresh.
>
>  Also, what I am learning here is that we are fairly hard on
ourselves and
> maybe the coffee was not up to what Les likes to roast, but it had
to be
> better than a can of brand anything for 4 dollars a pound. 
And, I bet it
> was far better than most of the people there are used to
drinking.  Though
> truth be told, there is something we all eat that someone else would
think
> is rather pedestrian in nature - from beer to bread to pasta.
>
>  What I do wonder is how many of those people will now want to
roast their
> own or at least buy better brands.  I guess that gets into how
do we educate
> people and get them to want the better stuff.  The reasons not
to are many,
> from time in the day to children to money to "I'd rather spend
my money and
> time on brewing beer."
>
>  What I have learned in my short time here is that this is not,
or doesn't
> have to be, a massively time consuming effort.  I guess we just
keep
> spreading the word.
>
>
>
>  At 04:38 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
>
> Steve, I think what you say about context is certainly true. I am
thinking
> about some of the truly horrible things I've eaten while camping
that I
> thought were wonderful at the time. Besides, the stale Harar
probably was
> much better -- and also less stale -- than the coffee Les' guests
usually
> drink at home.
>
>  ----- Original Message ----
>  From: Stephen Carey <steve>
>  To: homeroast
>  Sent: Saturday, July 28, 2007 10:42:12 AM
>  Subject: Re: +Shame on Me!
>
>  Les, glad you had some beans on hand.  I think a few
things go into the
> people liking it.  Some is just what you state, they don't know
better.
> Some is the environment, if they are having a good time they will
find food
> and drink more pleasing - I got that from my old sociology
classes.  They
> are caught up in the good time.
>
>  Plus, there is the factor that you brought it and they like
you, they won't
> tell you it is bad or stale.  If they knew you roasted it all
the more
> likely they will complement it.
>
>  Who knows what they said in the car when they left.
>
>  What counts is you were kind enough to share your beans and
talents with
> them, that will improve a cup any day.  Or, they just have no
taste, I like
> thinking the other way.  Just me.
>
>
>  At 01:23 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
>
> We have an annual picnic for our book club and part of the
desert
>  ritual is coffee.  I bring 4 thermoses full of good
homeroast most of
>  the time.  I went out to pick what to brew yesterday
afternoon, and I
>  was upset that the only two coffees roasted was the last of
the Puro
>  Scuro Blend and some Brazil Yellow Bourbon.  Both are at
their prime
>  and I didn't want to "throw my pearls before the
swine" again!  As I
>  was prepping the grinder for 6 back to back TV brews, I picked
up an
>  old Yogurt container and behold I heard the rattle of roasted
beans!
>  I popped the top off and behold the smell of Harar Horse lot
30!  I
>  figured I roasted those beans around the 5th of May and just
forgot to
>  put them in the care-package for my daughter and son-in-law
when we
>  went to Idaho.  I vacillated for about 10 seconds,
"Should I?"  "Yup!"
>   I ground it up and brewed a pot.  I took a test sip
and yes it was
>  Horse and yes it was stale!  Oh well.  Now for the
smirk and
>  disappointment at the same time!  Everyone LOVED
IT!  I could stomach
>  about half a cup.  It was gone gone gone and people were
ranting and
>  raving about it being the best ever!  So for the average
person, there
>  needs to be an added cupping score labeled
"staleness."  So the good
>  thing is all the hard work of the folks in Ethiopia didn't go
in the
>  trash without being brewed and I am enjoying my Puro Scuro
this
>  morning as I type.  I am also a bit heart broken to think
how ignorant
>  people can be.
>
>  Les
> 
>  homeroast mailing list
> 
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroast>  To change your personal list settings (digest options,
vacations,
> unsvbscribes) go to
>
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings>
>
>  Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_214160546==.ALT--

7) From: Les
Oh, I was enjoying myself.  I had a hard time not busting out laughing
as I saw 3-4 of the group check out all 4 themos to see if they could
find that elusive last drop!
On 7/28/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>

8) From: Justin Marquez
What we do with our green coffee beans when compared to store-bought coffee
is much like the difference between home-baked bread and that stuff down on
aisle 2 at the supermarket wrapped in colorful plasic.  The typical consumer
relies on convenience and habit more than anything else.  How many of us
here bake all our own bread?  There are a few perhaps, probably more than
the average sampling of consumers - but not many I'd bet.
Safe Journeys and Sweet Music
Justin Marquez (CYPRESS, TX)
On 7/28/07, Stephen Carey  wrote:
<Snip>

9) From: Eddie Dove
So Les,
Shouldn't you be planning / roasting for you book club meeting around Halloween?
Eddie
-- 
Vita non est vivere sed valere vita est
Roasting Blog and Profiles for the Gene Cafehttp://southcoastcoffeeroaster.blogspot.com/On 7/28/07, Les  wrote:
<Snip>

10) From: Stephen Carey
Stephen Carey 
July 28, 2007  
   Justin, I see your point.  I do wonder how much is habit and added to
   that the belief that there isn't time.  It can be a family or couples
   thing, there are many ways to fit this or other things, like bread
   into our lives, we just want to have to.  I will say that both of my
   brothers-in-law bake all of their bread for their families and one
   has 3 children and the other has triplets who are 3, another one who
   is 2, and a 9 year old.  If they can find time most anyone should be
   able to.  For them it is about quality, variety, and a little about
   cost and quality combined.  For the quality they get per dollar can't
   be matched in most grocery stores.
   
   Stephen Mark Carey
   
   (703) 914-9593 Tel
   
  http://www.atriptoparadise.comStephen Carey
7413 Inzer Street
North Springfield, VA 22181
 http://www.atriptoparadise.com)------------------------------------------------------------------------
Email that means Business, Every email, Every day! - LetterClick BrandMail(=
TM) found only at www.letterclick.net
At 10:00 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

11) From: Stephen Carey
Justin, I see your point.  I do wonder how much is habit and added to 
that the belief that there isn't time.  It can be a family or couples 
thing, there are many ways to fit this or other things, like bread 
into our lives, we just want to have to.  I will say that both of my 
brothers-in-law bake all of their bread for their families and one 
has 3 children and the other has triplets who are 3, another one who 
is 2, and a 9 year old.  If they can find time most anyone should be 
able to.  For them it is about quality, variety, and a little about 
cost and quality combined.  For the quality they get per dollar can't 
be matched in most grocery stores.
At 10:00 PM 7/28/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

12) From: Rick Copple
I have converted a few friends. Mostly by taking a thermos of it to 
church on occasion. Several like that when I do it, and at a big get 
together they were planning, the asked me if I would make the coffee for 
the event. Even though it meant running the coffee through their urn, I 
did and it would still be far better than anything they could get at the 
store.
But, for some people, they have grown up with stale coffee, Folgers, MH 
or whatever, and as far as they are concerned, that's what coffee taste 
like. When it doesn't taste like that to some degree, doesn't have that 
stale taste in it, they think it isn't as good because for them, coffee 
that comes out of a can is their standard of what it should taste like, 
and they have acclimated themselves to that taste as what they want. I 
know before home roasting, I probably would have taken that attitude, 
and if I had tasted something like Horse or Monsoon Malibar, I would 
have thought it weird and gone back to my Folgers.
So, some people have that reaction, it needs to be stale to "taste" like 
good coffee to them, if it has flavor added to that, then it is great. 
Others, like when I took that first sip of freshly roasted Costa Rican 
Tarasu, my eyes lit up and I couldn't keep the cup away from mouth it 
tasted so good.
So, some like it, some are too stuck that good coffee taste like Folgers 
to want it. Some love it, and those are the ones who tend to start home 
roasting.
-- 
Rick Copplehttp://www.copple.us/blog/

13) From: Stephen Carey
--=====================_265676296==.ALT
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed
Rick,
Excellent point.  And if I think about it, I know the ones who may 
want to start home roasting or will be at my door for a bag or 
so.  They are the ones who shop carefully at the local coffee shop 
with a roaster, they bake from scratch, their eyes do light up at 
something different and special, even if it takes a few attempts to 
get used to it.  Thank you.
Stephen
At 02:57 AM 7/29/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
--=====================_265676296==.ALT
Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Rick,
Excellent point.  And if I think about it, I know the ones who may
want to start home roasting or will be at my door for a bag or so. 
They are the ones who shop carefully at the local coffee shop with a
roaster, they bake from scratch, their eyes do light up at something
different and special, even if it takes a few attempts to get used to
it.  Thank you.
Stephen
At 02:57 AM 7/29/2007, you wrote:
I have converted a few friends.
Mostly by taking a thermos of it to church on occasion. Several like that
when I do it, and at a big get together they were planning, the asked me
if I would make the coffee for the event. Even though it meant running
the coffee through their urn, I did and it would still be far better than
anything they could get at the store.
But, for some people, they have grown up with stale coffee, Folgers, MH
or whatever, and as far as they are concerned, that's what coffee taste
like. When it doesn't taste like that to some degree, doesn't have that
stale taste in it, they think it isn't as good because for them, coffee
that comes out of a can is their standard of what it should taste like,
and they have acclimated themselves to that taste as what they want. I
know before home roasting, I probably would have taken that attitude, and
if I had tasted something like Horse or Monsoon Malibar, I would have
thought it weird and gone back to my Folgers.
So, some people have that reaction, it needs to be stale to
"taste" like good coffee to them, if it has flavor added to
that, then it is great. Others, like when I took that first sip of
freshly roasted Costa Rican Tarasu, my eyes lit up and I couldn't keep
the cup away from mouth it tasted so good.
So, some like it, some are too stuck that good coffee taste like Folgers
to want it. Some love it, and those are the ones who tend to start home
roasting.
-- 
Rick Copple
http://www.copple.us/blog/homeroast mailing list
http://lists.sweetmarias.com/mailman/listinfo/homeroastTo change your personal list settings (digest options, vacations,
unsvbscribes) go to
http://sweetmarias.com/maillistinfo.html#personalsettings--=====================_265676296==.ALT--


HomeRoast Digest