HomeRoast Digest


Topic: 5 Roast - a winner (8 msgs / 1101 lines)
1) From: Stephen Carey
It may be a bit premature to say that the roast is a winner for it is 
only 15 minutes old, but the first crunch test was magnificent.  The 
flavors flooded my tongue, but not all at once, some seemed to want 
to take their time.
So, I roasted, on my IR2, 171 grams of Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma with 
the intent on hitting City +.  I think I got there.
I used a suggested setting format to attempt this.  It was, and many 
of you will recognize it:
340 F for 2 minutes
395 F for 3 minutes
450 F for 4 minutes
Then a cool down cycle of 4 minutes, then the colander and a wooden 
spoon for another 10 minutes until the beans were room temperature.
The first crack came at 6 minutes 6 seconds into the roast.
The end result is a beautiful looking bean, a bit oily, I do have to 
admit.  The smell is wonderful.
There was more chaff than in any of my roasts to date.  Enough that 
the chaff began to smoke just as it went into the cool cycle.
Big question:  we talk of testing a roast and not waiting 24 hours to 
get a feel for it.  But how soon is that?  4 or 12 hours?  Help on 
this one is appreciated.
I did NOT use the stethoscope.  I was using two hands to keep the 
dryer tube which is attached to the fan from vibrating the lid right 
off.  With our measly fan it doesn't do much anyway, but it does 
some, for the neighbors came over again to try a bean.
They are great, the wife is from South Africa and the husband from 
Hungary, so we always try out food from them.  It is nice to have 
something to offer them in return - they love coffee.  They shop 
where I do, either at Jammin Java (in Vienna, VA) or Java House (in DC).
I will let you know how the roast turns out.  I still get confused by 
City+ and Full City+, but keep on learning.
Thank you,
Stephen

2) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Stephen,
    If you were trying for a C+ and the beans are oily then I think you
went to a FC+  IMO.  Try stopping a bit sooner and remember once you hit
second crack the roast will continue until the cooling brings the
temperature down.  The beans go from an ENDOTHERMIC start (they adsorb
heat) all the way up to second crack. Once Second Crack starts the beans
go through a chemical breakdown and become EXOTHERMIC (give off heat)
this chemical breakdown is what causes the sugars to breakdown and
causes the beans to release the oils trapped inside.  Knowing that you
can and I have had a roast "run away from me" and get WAY too dark.  
Here is what I use for my roasting:
My FRESHROASTED Guide
Just at the end of First Crack = C
Lighter brown midway between first and second crack = C+/FC
No oil, but just before the oils start, dark brown beans (few outlying
second crackers just starting up) = FC
Oily only in spots(into second crack) = FC/FC+
Oily(nearing the end of second crack) = FC+/Vienna
This is my guide for roasting and YMMV and I am sure the group will have
varying opinions on the levels, but most of us roughly go by what Tom
has on the site
{I am without internet currently if some one could post the link to
Tom's roasting guide thanks!}
Personally what I thougth when I read your post the first thing that
stood out in my mind was that you said it took 14 min to cool the beans.
Personally I like them cool in under 5 min to prevent the runaways (but
if you pull your roast early a slower cooling can allow the roast to
"coast" to where you want it to end.)
Most beans after sitting for a length of time (7+ days at the FC range)
will start to show some oily spots but if you have oil right after the
roast I would say that most on the list would agree that you are beyond
the C+ range.
That all being said the most important thing to remember is - YOU are
the roaster and the consumer therefore if you like it you make it like
that! Your cup is what matters the most to you!
Stephen thank you for sharing with the group, we all enjoy the excitment
when someone goes through the roasting from the start. We are all there
in spirit with you everytime you fire up your roaster! We are all
learning more everyday!
 
***If you ever make it down to the Hampton Roads part of VA let me know
I'll gladly set up a demo of my roasting for you!***
Dennis
V/R,
FC1(SW/AW) Dennis W. True
"Life Liberty and the pursuit of all who threaten it..."
 Stephen Carey wrote:
It may be a bit premature to say that the roast is a winner for it is
only 15 minutes old, but the first crunch test was magnificent.  The
flavors flooded my tongue, but not all at once, some seemed to want
to take their time.
So, I roasted, on my IR2, 171 grams of Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma with
the intent on hitting City +.  I think I got there.
I used a suggested setting format to attempt this.  It was, and many
of you will recognize it:
340 F for 2 minutes
395 F for 3 minutes
450 F for 4 minutes
Then a cool down cycle of 4 minutes, then the colander and a wooden
spoon for another 10 minutes until the beans were room temperature.
The first crack came at 6 minutes 6 seconds into the roast.
The end result is a beautiful looking bean, a bit oily, I do have to
admit.  The smell is wonderful.
There was more chaff than in any of my roasts to date.  Enough that
the chaff began to smoke just as it went into the cool cycle.
Big question:  we talk of testing a roast and not waiting 24 hours to
get a feel for it.  But how soon is that?  4 or 12 hours?  Help on
this one is appreciated.
I did NOT use the stethoscope.  I was using two hands to keep the
dryer tube which is attached to the fan from vibrating the lid right
off.  With our measly fan it doesn't do much anyway, but it does
some, for the neighbors came over again to try a bean.
They are great, the wife is from South Africa and the husband from
Hungary, so we always try out food from them.  It is nice to have
something to offer them in return - they love coffee.  They shop
where I do, either at Jammin Java (in Vienna, VA) or Java House (in DC).
I will let you know how the roast turns out.  I still get confused by
City+ and Full City+, but keep on learning.
Thank you,
Stephen

3) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
 
 
Stephen,
	    If you were trying for a C+ and the beans are oily then I
think you went to a FC+  IMO.  Try stopping a bit sooner and remember
once you hit second crack the roast will continue until the cooling
brings the temperature down.  The beans go from an ENDOTHERMIC start
(they adsorb heat) all the way up to second crack. Once Second Crack
starts the beans go through a chemical breakdown and become EXOTHERMIC
(give off heat) this chemical breakdown is what causes the sugars to
breakdown and causes the beans to release the oils trapped inside.
Knowing that you can and I have had a roast "run away from me" and get
WAY too dark.  
	Here is what I use for my roasting:
	
	My FRESHROASTED Guide
	Just at the end of First Crack = C
	Lighter brown midway between first and second crack = C+/FC
	No oil, but just before the oils start, dark brown beans (few
outlying second crackers just starting up) = FC
	Oily only in spots(into second crack) = FC/FC+
	Oily(nearing the end of second crack) = FC+/Vienna
	
	This is my guide for roasting and YMMV and I am sure the group
will have varying opinions on the levels, but most of us roughly go by
what Tom has on the site
	{I am without internet currently if some one could post the link
to Tom's roasting guide thanks!}
	Personally what I thougth when I read your post the first thing
that stood out in my mind was that you said it took 14 min to cool the
beans.  Personally I like them cool in under 5 min to prevent the
runaways (but if you pull your roast early a slower cooling can allow
the roast to "coast" to where you want it to end.)
	
	Most beans after sitting for a length of time (7+ days at the FC
range) will start to show some oily spots but if you have oil right
after the roast I would say that most on the list would agree that you
are beyond the C+ range.
	
	
	That all being said the most important thing to remember is -
YOU are the roaster and the consumer therefore if you like it you make
it like that! Your cup is what matters the most to you!
	Stephen thank you for sharing with the group, we all enjoy the
excitment when someone goes through the roasting from the start. We are
all there in spirit with you everytime you fire up your roaster! We are
all learning more everyday!
	 
	***If you ever make it down to the Hampton Roads part of VA let
me know I'll gladly set up a demo of my roasting for you!***
	
	
	Dennis
	V/R,
	FC1(SW/AW) Dennis W. True
	
	"Life Liberty and the pursuit of all who threaten it..."
	
	
	 Stephen Carey wrote:
	
	
	It may be a bit premature to say that the roast is a winner for
it is
	only 15 minutes old, but the first crunch test was magnificent.
The
	flavors flooded my tongue, but not all at once, some seemed to
want
	to take their time.
	
	So, I roasted, on my IR2, 171 grams of Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma
with
	the intent on hitting City +.  I think I got there.
	
	I used a suggested setting format to attempt this.  It was, and
many
	of you will recognize it:
	
	340 F for 2 minutes
	
	395 F for 3 minutes
	
	450 F for 4 minutes
	
	Then a cool down cycle of 4 minutes, then the colander and a
wooden
	spoon for another 10 minutes until the beans were room
temperature.
	
	The first crack came at 6 minutes 6 seconds into the roast.
	
	The end result is a beautiful looking bean, a bit oily, I do
have to
	admit.  The smell is wonderful.
	
	There was more chaff than in any of my roasts to date.  Enough
that
	the chaff began to smoke just as it went into the cool cycle.
	
	Big question:  we talk of testing a roast and not waiting 24
hours to
	get a feel for it.  But how soon is that?  4 or 12 hours?  Help
on
	this one is appreciated.
	
	I did NOT use the stethoscope.  I was using two hands to keep
the
	dryer tube which is attached to the fan from vibrating the lid
right
	off.  With our measly fan it doesn't do much anyway, but it does
	some, for the neighbors came over again to try a bean.
	
	They are great, the wife is from South Africa and the husband
from
	Hungary, so we always try out food from them.  It is nice to
have
	something to offer them in return - they love coffee.  They shop
	where I do, either at Jammin Java (in Vienna, VA) or Java House
(in DC).
	
	I will let you know how the roast turns out.  I still get
confused by
	City+ and Full City+, but keep on learning.
	
	Thank you,
	
	Stephen
	
	

4) From: Stephen Carey
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Dennis,
Thank you and I think you are spot on.  I couldn't figure out why the 
patchy oil bothered me so.  The beans smell great, the bite taste was 
fun and good, but something bothered me.  I realized I have so over 
read that I can't remember the basics.  I had indeed, I believe as 
you do, gone more toward a FC+ roast, which is fine for this bean, 
but not what I was shooting for.  This time I let the numbers I had 
received be by guide and chose to ignore color, which I did.
I am looking forward to tasting the roast, for I think it will be 
closer to an espresso roast.  The beans don't taste burned and oil is 
patchy, not covering them.
I am going to keep track of this, as all of them, I will let you know 
the taste, but I am sure you are right.  Kind of a bummer, but they 
aren't ruined.
It is this dialing in part that gets me.  If I used a recommended 
roast and they went past where I want them do I cut temperature first 
or time?  In this case, I think time of the last cycle is in order.
Thank you for your guide below, trust me, I will take it and read 
it.  I am still bummed, I do hope I didn't take them too far.  I have 
a good feeling about that due to the tasting of a bean as I type, no 
burned flavor - but does that mean it isn't burned?  You  would think 
with five roasts I would have gotten this somewhat down, but jumping 
from bean to bean is kind of tough also.  Time to pull out the 1 
pound bags so I can truly work with one bean, get it where I want.
To be more fair to myself, the other beans all are very good, still 
better than any restaurant I have eaten at, just a bit disappointed 
that I needed someone else to point out the obvious, BUT, PLEASE KEEP 
DOING SO - I do want to learn this and have fun doing it, and I did 
on this one.
Later, Dennis.
All the best,
Stephen
At 08:42 AM 7/29/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Dennis,
Thank you and I think you are spot on.  I couldn't figure out why
the patchy oil bothered me so.  The beans smell great, the bite
taste was fun and good, but something bothered me.  I realized I
have so over read that I can't remember the basics.  I had indeed, I
believe as you do, gone more toward a FC+ roast, which is fine for this
bean, but not what I was shooting for.  This time I let the numbers
I had received be by guide and chose to ignore color, which I
did.
I am looking forward to tasting the roast, for I think it will be closer
to an espresso roast.  The beans don't taste burned and oil is
patchy, not covering them.
I am going to keep track of this, as all of them, I will let you know the
taste, but I am sure you are right.  Kind of a bummer, but they
aren't ruined.
It is this dialing in part that gets me.  If I used a recommended
roast and they went past where I want them do I cut temperature first or
time?  In this case, I think time of the last cycle is in
order.
Thank you for your guide below, trust me, I will take it and read
it.  I am still bummed, I do hope I didn't take them too far. 
I have a good feeling about that due to the tasting of a bean as I type,
no burned flavor - but does that mean it isn't burned?  You 
would think with five roasts I would have gotten this somewhat down, but
jumping from bean to bean is kind of tough also.  Time to pull out
the 1 pound bags so I can truly work with one bean, get it where I
want.
To be more fair to myself, the other beans all are very good, still
better than any restaurant I have eaten at, just a bit disappointed that
I needed someone else to point out the obvious, BUT, PLEASE KEEP DOING SO
- I do want to learn this and have fun doing it, and I did on this
one.
Later, Dennis.
All the best,
Stephen
At 08:42 AM 7/29/2007, you wrote:
 
 
Stephen,
    If you were trying for a C+ and the beans are oily
then I think you went to a FC+  IMO.  Try stopping a bit sooner
and remember once you hit second crack the roast will continue until the
cooling brings the temperature down.  The beans go from an
ENDOTHERMIC start (they
adsorb heat) all the way up to second crack. Once Second Crack starts the
beans go through a chemical breakdown and become
EXOTHERMIC (give off heat)
this chemical breakdown is what causes the sugars to breakdown and causes
the beans to release the oils trapped inside.  Knowing that you can
and I have had a roast "run away from me" and get WAY too
dark.  
Here is what I use for my roasting:
My FRESHROASTED Guide
Just at the end of First Crack = C
Lighter brown midway between first and second crack = C+/FC
No oil, but just before the oils start, dark brown beans (few
outlying second crackers just starting up) = FC
Oily only in spots(into second crack) = FC/FC+
Oily(nearing the end of second crack) = FC+/Vienna
This is my guide for roasting and YMMV and I am sure the group will
have varying opinions on the levels, but most of us roughly go by what
Tom has on the site
{I am without internet currently if some one could post the link to
Tom’s roasting guide thanks!}
Personally what I thougth when I read your post the first thing that
stood out in my mind was that you said it took 14 min to cool the
beans.  Personally I like them cool in under 5 min to prevent the
runaways (but if you pull your roast early a slower cooling can allow the
roast to "coast" to where you want it to end.)
Most beans after sitting for a length of time (7+ days at the FC
range) will start to show some oily spots but if you have oil right after
the roast I would say that most on the list would agree that you are
beyond the C+ range.
That all being said the most important thing to remember is - YOU
are the roaster and the consumer therefore if you like it you make it
like that! Your cup is what matters the most to you!
Stephen thank you for sharing with the group, we all enjoy the
excitment when someone goes through the roasting from the start. We are
all there in spirit with you everytime you fire up your roaster! We are
all learning more everyday!
 
***If you ever make it down to the Hampton Roads part of VA let me
know I'll gladly set up a demo of my roasting for you!***
Dennis
V/R,
FC1(SW/AW) Dennis W. True
"Life Liberty and the pursuit of
all who threaten it..."
 Stephen Carey wrote:
It may be a bit premature to say that the roast is a winner for it
is
only 15 minutes old, but the first crunch test was magnificent. 
The
flavors flooded my tongue, but not all at once, some seemed to
want
to take their time.
So, I roasted, on my IR2, 171 grams of Mexico FTO Oaxaca Pluma
with
the intent on hitting City +.  I think I got there.
I used a suggested setting format to attempt this.  It was, and
many
of you will recognize it:
340 F for 2 minutes
395 F for 3 minutes
450 F for 4 minutes
Then a cool down cycle of 4 minutes, then the colander and a
wooden
spoon for another 10 minutes until the beans were room
temperature.
The first crack came at 6 minutes 6 seconds into the roast.
The end result is a beautiful looking bean, a bit oily, I do have
to
admit.  The smell is wonderful.
There was more chaff than in any of my roasts to date.  Enough
that
the chaff began to smoke just as it went into the cool
cycle.
Big question:  we talk of testing a roast and not waiting 24
hours to
get a feel for it.  But how soon is that?  4 or 12
hours?  Help on
this one is appreciated.
I did NOT use the stethoscope.  I was using two hands to keep
the
dryer tube which is attached to the fan from vibrating the lid
right
off.  With our measly fan it doesn't do much anyway, but it
does
some, for the neighbors came over again to try a bean.
They are great, the wife is from South Africa and the husband
from
Hungary, so we always try out food from them.  It is nice to
have
something to offer them in return - they love coffee.  They
shop
where I do, either at Jammin Java (in Vienna, VA) or Java House (in
DC).
I will let you know how the roast turns out.  I still get
confused by
City+ and Full City+, but keep on learning.
Thank you,
Stephen
--=====================_262829015==.ALT--

5) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Don't beat yourself up over it,  I know only that I have so much to
learn and every roast teaches you something.  last years Otaxca was a
wonderful coffee from C+ thru FC+ so don't worry I'm sure you will end
up with a great cup either way
 
Dennis
 
V/R, 
FC1(SW/AW) Dennis W. True 
"Life Liberty and the pursuit of all who threaten it..."

6) From: Stephen Carey
Dennis, your help has been invaluable.  I used your guide on a roast 
of Panama Boquete - Lerida Estate Peaberry.  I really wanted this 
roast to be right at City +.
I made a few adjustments to the controls, actually, just time on the 
last cycle, which seemed long the first time.  But, more, I paid 
attention to the color and the 1st crack.  I killed the roast earlier 
than the final cycle was programmed for and I hit it right on.  The 
beans are beautiful, the crunch test that I do filled my mouth with 
wonderful flavors, from Vanilla to a malty flavor.  I can't wait to 
brew it later today.
So, thank you very much.  I am very much about my senses and you 
helped me to see what I was looking for.  I will certainly let you 
know how the roast tastes for it is partly yours.
All the best,
Stephen
At 10:37 AM 7/29/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>

7) From: True, Dennis W. FC1 (CVN69)
This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
Stephen,
    I have only been at this a year-and-a-half but I can remember being
exactly like you are right now I haven't forgotten my roots and I will
always strive to bring everyone that joins this obsession to a higher
level just remember that no matter what if it is good in the cup you did
something right!
I haven't had a bad cup of coffee from my roasts yet! Please do let me
know how the Panama comes out I still have some of last years Geisha
(only 2#) and I am hoping to pop that in the drum when I get back home!
I am so glad that my experiences have helped but I cannot take all the
credit after my learning curve took a huge leap just by spending one
afternoon with JavaJerry.  Actually having someone that knows what is
going to happen, show you and letting you see smell and hear the roast
with a watchful eye over your shoulder was invaluable to me.  
Are there any roasters around your area?  Maybe someone that could give
you a few hands on pointers during a roast I know that will help your
roasting ability more than you could imagine!
 
After all this, I have only roasted with HG/DB, Z&D and RK Drum.  I have
never even seen an IR2 other than pictures on Tom's site...  I am hoping
that someone with actual experience with an IR2 will chime in with some
other profiles, for you to experiment with I am just taking baby steps
with regards to profiles as I have only done 2 roasts in my drum.  When
I am HG/DB'ing I guess I instinctively do some by moving the HG closer
and farther away but trying to translate that to the drum when your
sight is removed from the equation is a big step as I am learning. 
 
Dennis
V/R, 
FC1(SW/AW) Dennis W. True 
"Life Liberty and the pursuit of all who threaten it..."

8) From: Stephen Carey
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Dennis,  you are very gracious.  I have been discussing the IR2 via 
email with some people I found who don't use this list - don't know why.
Plus, in some of the other posts I have seen and taken in some great 
information on the IR2.  Finally, on Sweet Maria's there is a 
boatload of stuff on the machine, plus when you buy it from here you 
get two pages or tips and tricks on the idiosyncrasies of the 
machine, and there are a number of them.
I do hope to fine someone in the area where we could get together to 
do a roast and where I could absorb the knowledge.  I may put it 
right out there on the list.  I know a few must come from here or 
near here.  I will let you know  how that turns out.
About the Panama, I tried it 19 hours after roasting, a small brew 
for I want to hit the 36 hour mark which I when I was told the favors 
seem to bloom.  Though anytime after 12 it is supposed to be 
good.  It was fantastic.  I could taste the vanilla first, then a 
kind of lemon flavoring (my favorite fruit, which I know its taste in 
anything), followed by the malt flavor it is famous for.  And it was 
truly there.  Sometimes I want to make sure my wishes don't overwhelm 
what is truly in the coffee, but in this roast, wow, it was all there 
and it was extremely, extremely smooth.  My partner doesn't even 
drink coffee but took a sip and said it was very good and kind of had 
a fruit taste to it.  Cool.  The real test will be tomorrow morning 
as my wake-up coffee.  I have nice mornings, even when busy, in which 
to enjoy my coffee, so I am really excited about it.
Thanks again.
Stephen
At 04:23 PM 7/30/2007, you wrote:
<Snip>
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Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii"
Dennis,  you are very gracious.  I have been
discussing the IR2 via email with some people I found who don't use this
list - don't know why.
Plus, in some of the other posts I have seen and taken in some great
information on the IR2.  Finally, on Sweet Maria's there is a
boatload of stuff on the machine, plus when you buy it from here you get
two pages or tips and tricks on the idiosyncrasies of the machine, and
there are a number of them.
I do hope to fine someone in the area where we could get together to do a
roast and where I could absorb the knowledge.  I may put it right
out there on the list.  I know a few must come from here or near
here.  I will let you know  how that turns out.
About the Panama, I tried it 19 hours after roasting, a small brew for I
want to hit the 36 hour mark which I when I was told the favors seem to
bloom.  Though anytime after 12 it is supposed to be good.  It
was fantastic.  I could taste the vanilla first, then a kind of
lemon flavoring (my favorite fruit, which I know its taste in anything),
followed by the malt flavor it is famous for.  And it was truly
there.  Sometimes I want to make sure my wishes don't overwhelm what
is truly in the coffee, but in this roast, wow, it was all there and it
was extremely, extremely smooth.  My partner doesn't even drink
coffee but took a sip and said it was very good and kind of had a fruit
taste to it.  Cool.  The real test will be tomorrow morning as
my wake-up coffee.  I have nice mornings, even when busy, in which
to enjoy my coffee, so I am really excited about it.
Thanks again.
Stephen
At 04:23 PM 7/30/2007, you wrote:
Stephen,<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns =
"urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />
   
I have only been at this a
year-and-a-half but I can remember being exactly like you are right now I
haven't forgotten my roots and I will always strive to bring everyone
that joins this obsession to a higher level just remember that no matter
what if it is good in the cup you did something right!
I haven't had a bad cup of coffee from my roasts yet! Please do let me
know how the Panama comes out I still have some of last years Geisha
(only 2#) and I am hoping to pop that in the drum when I get back
home!
I am so glad that my experiences have helped but I cannot take all the
credit after my learning curve took a huge leap just by spending one
afternoon with JavaJerry.  Actually having someone that knows what
is going to happen, show you and letting you see smell and hear the roast
with a watchful eye over your shoulder was invaluable to me. 
Are there any roasters around your area?  Maybe someone that could
give you a few hands on pointers during a roast I know that will help
your roasting ability more than you could imagine!
 
After all this, I have only roasted with HG/DB, Z&D and RK
Drum.  I have never even seen an IR2 other than pictures on Tom's
site...  I am hoping that someone with actual experience with an IR2
will chime in with some other profiles, for you to experiment with I am
just taking baby steps with regards to profiles as I have only done 2
roasts in my drum.  When I am HG/DB’ing I guess I instinctively do
some by moving the HG closer and farther away but trying to translate
that to the drum when your sight is removed from the equation is a big
step as I am learning. 
 
Dennis
V/R, 
FC1(SW/AW) Dennis W. True 
"Life Liberty and the pursuit of all who threaten
it..." 
-----Original
Message-----
From: homeroast-admin
[
mailto:homeroast-admin] On Behalf Of
Stephen Carey
Sent: Monday, July 30, 2007 10:38 AM
To: homeroast
Subject: RE: +5 Roast - a winner
Dennis, your help has been
invaluable.  I used your guide on a roast of Panama Boquete - Lerida
Estate Peaberry.  I really wanted this roast to be right at City
+.
I made a few adjustments to the controls, actually, just time on the
last cycle, which seemed long the first time.  But, more, I paid
attention to the color and the 1st crack.  I killed the roast
earlier than the final cycle was programmed for and I hit it right
on.  The beans are beautiful, the crunch test that I do filled my
mouth with wonderful flavors, from Vanilla to a malty flavor.  I
can't wait to brew it later today.
So, thank you very much.  I am very much about my senses and you
helped me to see what I was looking for.  I will certainly let you
know how the roast tastes for it is partly yours.
All the best,
Stephen
--=====================_373395046==.ALT--


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